Question about 1989 Volvo 240

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Front calipers need to be bled, but bleeder screws are snaped off and the bolts on the lines are rounded off

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Two choiches buy some re-con callipers or get the old ones drilled out and fit new nippels as for the pipes use mole grips to undo then fit new pipes .for yours and other peoples safety brakes need to be spot on so check for any leaks after doing job

Posted on Dec 11, 2009

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1995 crown victoria brakes will not bleed


anual Bleeding
The primary and secondary (front and rear) hydraulic brake systems are individual systems and are bled separately. Bleed the longest line first on the individual system being serviced. During the complete bleeding operation, DO NOT allow the brake master cylinder reservoir (2K478) to run dry. Keep the master cylinder reservoirs filled with High Performance DOT-3 Brake Fluid C6AZ-19542-AA or DOT-3 equivalent meeting Ford specification ESA-M6C25-A. Never reuse brake fluid that has been drained from the hydraulic system or has been allowed to stand in an open container for an extended period of time.
NOTE: Non-ABS vehicles have the brake master cylinder (2140) mounted at an angle to the horizontal, bleeding may be better performed if the vehicle is positioned so that the brake master cylinder is horizontal.
  1. To bleed the brake system, position a suitable box wrench on the bleeder fitting on the brake wheel cylinder. Attach a rubber drain tube to the bleeder fitting. The end of the tube should fit snugly around the bleeder fitting.
  1. Submerge the free end of the tube in a container partially filled with clean brake fluid, and loosen the bleeder fitting approximately three-quarters of a turn.
  1. Have an assistant push the brake pedal (2455) down slowly through its full travel. Close the bleeder fitting, then return the brake pedal to full-release position. Repeat this operation until air bubbles cease to appear at the submerged end of the bleeder tube.
  1. When the fluid is completely free of air bubbles, secure the bleeder fitting and remove the bleeder tube.
  1. Repeat this procedure at the brake wheel cylinder on the opposite side. Refill the brake master cylinder reservoir after each wheel cylinder is bled, and install the master cylinder cap and gasket. Ensure the diaphragm-type gasket is properly positioned in the master cylinder cap. When the bleeding operation is completed, the fluid level should be at the MAX line to 4.0 mm (0.16 inch) below.
  1. If the primary (front brake) system is to be bled, repeat Steps 2 through 5 at the right front brake caliper and ending at the left front brake caliper. Bleed the brake master cylinder at the bleed screw after all calipers are bled.
  1. After disc brake service, ensure that the disc brake pistons are returned to their normal positions and the shoe and lining assemblies are properly seated. This is accomplished by depressing the brake pedal several times until normal pedal travel is established.
  1. Check pedal feel. If brake pedal feels "spongy" repeat bleed procedure, or use the Vacuum method as outlined in Section 06-09, but bleed both rear calipers first.

You can also pressure bleed it. If the abs module needs to be bleed, that requires a special tool. If you have already tried the procedure posted and it didn't work, I'm not sure what next?

Jan 30, 2018 | Ford Crown Victoria Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I replaced both front calipers and rotors on my 08 Escape. I then bled the brakes, but the pedal goes to the floor. What is going on ?


It has ABS so you have to bleed the brakes from the brake caliper up to the reservoir using a positive pressure brake bleeder. The unit holds the fluid and pushes clean fluid and the air up to the reservoir under pressure.

Sep 23, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Rear caliper on 2005 Ford F150 not releasing, replaced both rear calipers, now pedal goes to the floor - no brakes at all. What can/should i do?


Sounds like it still has some air in the system or a bad master cylinder. First try bleeding all air, there is definitely some air left in the lines and this is most probably causing the problem. Bled the lines at the bleeder screws on the calipers. ---------- There is air left in the brake line.Any time the brake system is opened to replace brake lines, caliper, pads etc etc.Mostly the air enters the system, and that air has to be completely bleed.Otherwise the same symptoms , what you are getting will be noticed.-------- Brakes can be bled manually, with a power bleeder, injector tool or vacuum bleeder.IIt does not make any difference which method you use as long as all the lines and components are flushed with enough fluid to remove any trapped air bubbles or air pockets.----
The most common bleeding procedure is to bleed the brake furthest from the master cylinder first, then bleed the other brake that shares the same hydraulic circuit (which may be the other rear brake on a rear-wheel drive car or truck, or the opposite front brake on a front-wheel drive car or minivan). After these have been bled, you then bleed the other brake circuit starting with the furthest brake from the master cylinder.--------- When the complete air is bleed from the line, the brake should be firm when car is on.In your case brake brake pedal is loose and goes almost to the floor when car is ON.This is due to Air in the line.Get the complete air bleed from brake line.------- This will help.Thanks.Helpmech

Sep 07, 2011 | 1998 Ford F150 Regular Cab

1 Answer

Need to know procedure for bleeding brakes on1987 gmc s15 2.8 litre 4x4 front disc w/abs


MANUAL BLEEDING

For those of us who are not fortunate enough to have access to a power bleeding tool, the manual brake bleeding procedure will quite adequately remove air from the hydraulic system. The major difference between the pressure and manual bleeding procedures is that the manual method takes more time and will require help from an assistant. One person must depress the brake pedal, while another opens and closes the bleeder screws.

In addition to a length of clear neoprene bleeder hose, bleeder wrenches and a clear bleeder bottle (old plastic jar or drink bottle will suffice), bleeding late-model ABS systems may also require the use of one or more relatively inexpensive combination valve pressure bleeding tools (which are used to depress one or more valves in order to allow component/system bleeding). To fully bleed the late model ABS systems, a scan tool should also be used to run the system through functional tests.
  1. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover and fill the reservoirs with clean fluid. To prevent squirting fluid, and possibly damaging painted surfaces, install the cover during the procedure, but be sure to frequently check and top off the reservoirs with fresh fluid.
CAUTION Never reuse brake fluid which has been bled from the system.
  1. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected to contain air. If the master cylinder was removed and bench bled before installation it must still be bled, but it should take less time and effort. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
    1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle's finish as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.
    1. Loosen the front brake line at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.
    2. Have a friend depress the brake pedal slowly and hold (air and/or fluid should be expelled from the loose fitting). Tighten the line, then release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Loosen the fitting and repeat until all air is removed from the master cylinder bore.
    3. When finished, tighten the line fitting to 20 ft. lbs. (5 Nm).
    4. Repeat the sequence at the master cylinder rear pipe fitting.
During the bleeding procedure, make sure your assistant does NOT release the brake pedal while a fitting is loosened or while a bleeder screw is opening. Air will be drawn back into the system.
  1. Check and refill the master cylinder reservoir.
Remember, if the reservoir is allowed to empty of fluid during the procedure, air will be drawn into the system and the bleeding procedure must be restarted at the master cylinder assembly.
  1. On late model ABS equipped vehicles, perform the special ABS procedures as described later in this section. On 4 wheel ABS systems the Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV) must be bled (if it has been replaced or if it is suspected to contain air) and on most Rear Wheel Anti-Lock (RWAL) systems the combination valve must be held open. In both cases, special combination valve depressor tools should be used during bleeding and a scan tool must be used for ABS function tests.
  1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
    1. Right rear
    2. Left rear
    3. Right front
    4. Left front
  2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
    1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end. Be sure the hose is seated snugly on the screw or you may be squirted with brake fluid.
Be very careful when bleeding wheel cylinders and brake calipers. The bleeder screws often rust in position and may easily break off if forced. Installing a new bleeder screw will often require removal of the component and may include overhaul or replacement of the wheel cylinder/caliper. To help prevent the possibility of breaking a bleeder screw, spray it with some penetrating oil before attempting to loosen it.
    1. Submerge the other end of the tube in a transparent container of clean brake fluid.
    2. Loosen the bleed screw, then have a friend apply the brake pedal slowly and hold. Tighten the bleed screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm), release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Repeat the sequence (including the 15 second pause) until all air is expelled from the caliper or cylinder.
    3. Tighten the bleeder screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm) when finished.
  1. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
  2. If the brake warning light is on, depress the brake pedal firmly. If there is no air in the system, the light will go out.
  3. After bleeding, make sure that a firm pedal is achieved before attempting to move the vehicle.

Hope helps (remember to rate this answer).

Apr 13, 2011 | 1987 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

I replaced the whole back break line,as i try to bleed them i get fluid out of the front passenger side and the back driver side,but nothing out of the other two.whats the problem?


Hi, your proportioning valve is stuck. Take the caps off and recenter the one stuck valve. Then rebleed the system using the procedure below. Thanks for using fixya.

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For those of us who are not fortunate enough to have access to a power bleeding tool, the manual brake bleeding procedure will quite adequately remove air from the hydraulic system. The major difference between the pressure and manual bleeding procedures is that the manual method takes more time and will require help from an assistant. One person must depress the brake pedal, while another opens and closes the bleeder screws.
  1. Deplete the vacuum reserve by applying the brakes several times with the ignition OFF .
  2. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover and fill the reservoirs with clean fluid.
  3. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected to contain air. If the master cylinder was removed and bench bled before installation it must still be bled, but it should take less time and effort. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
    1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
    2. Loosen the front brake line(s) at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.




WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle's finish as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.

  1. Tighten the line connection(s).
  2. Have an assistant depress and hold the brake pedal.
  3. Loosen the line connection(s) again, allowing air to escape from the master cylinder.
  4. Tighten the line(s), then have the assistant release the brake pedal and wait for 15 seconds.
  5. Repeat steps D through F until the line(s) are free of air.
  6. When finished bleeding the air from the master cylinder, tighten the line connections to 20 ft. lbs. (27 Nm).
  7. Repeat steps B through H, only with the master cylinder rear pipe fitting(s).

  1. Refill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid.



WARNING Never reuse brake fluid that has been bled from the system.

  1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
    1. Right rear
    2. Left rear
    3. Right front
    4. Left front

  2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
    1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end. Be sure the hose is seated snugly on the screw or you may be squirted with brake fluid.
    2. Submerge the other end of the tube in a transparent container of clean brake fluid.
    3. With the help of an assistant, apply the brake pedal slowly and hold.


During the bleeding procedure, make sure your assistant does NOT release the brake pedal while a fitting is loosened or while a bleeder screw is opening. Air will be drawn back into the system.
  1. While the assistant continues to apply pressure to the brake pedal, loosen the bleeder screw, and watch for air bubbles in the container.

Be very careful when loosening the wheel cylinder and brake caliper bleeding screws. The bleeder screws often rust in position and may easily break off if forced. To help prevent the possibility of breaking a bleeder screw, spray it with some penetrating oil before attempting to loosen it. Installing a new bleeder screw will often require removal of the component and may include overhaul or replacement of the wheel cylinder/caliper.
  1. Tighten the bleeder screw.
  2. Instruct the assistant to release the brake pedal.
  3. Wait approximately 15 seconds, and instruct the assistant to depress the brake pedal again.

Remember, if the reservoir is allowed to empty of fluid during the procedure, air will be drawn into the system and the bleeding procedure must be restarted at the master cylinder assembly.
  1. Repeat steps C through F until there are no air bubbles present in the container.

  1. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
  2. If the brake warning light is on, depress the brake pedal firmly. If there is no air in the system, the light will go out.
  3. Once all the air is bled from the system, install the bleeder screw caps.
  4. After bleeding, make sure that a firm pedal is achieved before attempting to move the vehicle.

Feb 14, 2011 | 1994 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

Will I need a caliper reset tool kit to change the brakes on my 2007 toyota sienna or will a standard c-clamp do the job? And since it is an ABS system, I assume that brakes must be bled, correct?


Brake Pads Removal & Installation Front To Remove:
  1. Remove the front wheels. Front brake caliper (exploded view) toyota-09-00-5838.gif

  2. Loosen the caliper bleeder.
  3. Hold the slide pin; remove the 2 mounting bolts and remove the brake caliper from the support.
  4. Support the caliper.
  5. Open the brake bleeder. Press the caliper piston into the bore.
  6. Close the bleeder after the piston has reached the bottom of the caliper bore.
  7. Remove the brake pads, support plates, wear indicators and anti squeal shims.
  8. Remove the slide pins and bushings from the caliper support.
To Install:
  1. Lubricate the slide pins and bushings with brake grease.
  2. Install the bushing on the slide pin.
  3. Install the slide pin on the caliper support.
  4. Install the brake pad support plates on the caliper supports.
  5. Lubricate the anti squeal shims with brake grease.
  6. Install the anti squeal shims on the brake pads.
  7. Install the pad wear indicator facing upward and install the pads on the caliper support.
  8. Install the caliper on the support.
  9. Install the 2 mounting bolts, hold the slide pins and tighten 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  10. Fill the reservoir and bleed the brakes.
  11. Install the front wheels.
Rear To Remove:
  1. Remove the rear wheels.
  2. Loosen the caliper bleeder. Rear brake caliper (exploded view) toyota-09-00-5842.gif

  3. Hold the slide pin; remove the 2 mounting bolts and rear brake caliper assembly from the support.
  4. Support the caliper.
  5. Open the brake bleeder. Press the caliper piston into the bore.
  6. Close the bleeder after the piston has reached the bottom of the caliper bore.
  7. Remove the brake pads, support plates, and anti squeal shims.
  8. Remove the slide pins from the caliper support.
To Install:
  1. Lubricate the slide pins with brake grease.
  2. Install the slide pin on the caliper support.
  3. Install the brake pad support plates on the caliper supports.
  4. Lubricate the anti squeal shims with brake grease.
  5. Install the anti squeal shims on the brake pads.
  6. Install the rear pads on the caliper support.
  7. Install the rear caliper on the support.
  8. Install the 2 mounting bolts, hold the slide pins and tighten 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  9. Fill the reservoir and bleed the brakes.
  10. Install the front wheels.
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Sep 18, 2010 | 2007 Toyota Sienna

1 Answer

Pistons in both front calipers stay out, both calipers replaced


You may have a leak in the booster or master cylinder. You can put a pressure tester on the system to test for leaks. It does sound like you have an air leak.
You can try to bleed the master cylinder, then slave cylinder, then brake lines.

Aug 24, 2009 | 1993 Oldsmobile Achieva

3 Answers

Bleed brakes but no pedal


Good! You bled the master cyl. before installation! The proper order of bleeding the lines, is to start with the wheel the greatest distance from the master cylinder. Then work your way to the next greatest distance, and last, the closest wheel. Make sure all air is removed from the lines before you proceed to the next wheel, and frequently check the master cyl. level, because, as I'm sure you know, if you **** in air at the master, you have to start all over again. I'm assuming you don't have a power bleeder, so with a helper do this with car running (make sure it's on safety stands and not going to fall on you!) Pump pedal 3 times, no need to mash the pedal into the floor, just 3 pumps 1/2 way down, hold 3rd pump at half way down level while bleeder is opened, when flow is about to stop at bleeder, close bleeder and repeat til no evidence of any air. Let me know how it goes and if you need any help.

Apr 21, 2009 | 2003 Pontiac Montana

2 Answers

Brake problems


Have you bled the brakes since you put it all back together?

Apr 06, 2009 | 2002 Kia Sportage

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