Question about 1999 Chevrolet Blazer

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Changed back calipers. tried to bleed the brakes.nothing came out took the hose off still no brake fluid

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The problem is your vehicle has A.B.S.Anti lock brakes,a pressure bleeder is needed or run 12 volt jumper wire to the anti lock electric plug this will take care of the problem.

Posted on Nov 14, 2009

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1988 Chevy scottsdale front brakes locked up brake fluid full help


If your brake hose collapsed internally that will cause brakes to lock to be sure its the hose and not the calipers open the bleed screw and see if the rotor release. If they stay locked then maybe calipers seized try to pry brake pads apart with caliper mounted and brake bleeder open if they return easy then change your brake hose.

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E2000 mazda tray top .weak fluid pressure from master ,fcylinder to caliper foot pedal does not pump up pressure enough to bleed caliper


Yes it could be a bad master cylinder. But always remember when bleeding brakes. No matter what component on the brake system was changed. You ALWAYS bleed all four wheels and rule #2 ALWAYS bleed from furthest from the master cylinder first and work your way to the master cylinder. This ensures you remove all the air from the break system and not just move the air back and forth inside the lines. Try that. Hope this helps.

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Brakes are stuck


sounds like your caliper is bad. if you can do a brake job the just by a new caliper and replace it nothing special to do just bleed it real well.

Nov 18, 2011 | 1998 Dodge Intrepid

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What are the proper steps to bleeding your brakes on a 1990 vw golf deisel


For left hand drive vehicles: (If the car does not have ABS system you do not need any diagnostic equipment!)

IMPORTANT NOTE: You need using diagnostic equipment connected to the data link connector of the car in order to bleed the ABS block. Follow instructions by scantool equipment for bleeding the ABS block.


1. This bleeding procedure requires two people. Remove the brake system reservoir cap, and fill up with new brake fluid until "MAX" level is reached.
2. Lift the car, or use a channel for access under vehicle.
3. Put the gearbox in "N" - Neutral position, or in "P" - Parking position for automatic transmission.
4. Start the engine and push the brake pedal firmly for 4 - 5 times to the floor, and maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor.
5. Begin with the rear right wheel. Another person remove the dust cap and loose the brake caliper bleeding screw until the brake pedal goes to the floor. At this moment maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling, and tight the brake caliper bleeding screw. Use a plastic hose: one end connected to the brake caliper bleeding screw, and another end inside a recovery bottle for used brake fluid.
6. Repeat steps no.#4 and no.#5 until no air flows through the brake caliper bleeding screw. Tight the brake caliper bleeding screw, and put the dust cap in their place.

IMPORTANT NOTE: All the time check the brake fluid level in the brake system reservoir, and fill up if necessary!

7. Push the brake pedal firmly for 4 - 5 times to the floor, and maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling.
8. Continue with the rear left wheel. Another person remove the dust cap and loose the brake caliper bleeding screw until the brake pedal goes to the floor. At this moment maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling, and tight the brake caliper bleeding screw. Use a plastic hose: one end connected to the brake caliper bleeding screw, and another end inside a recovery bottle for used brake fluid.
9. Repeat steps no.#7 and no.#8 until no air flows through the brake caliper bleeding screw. Tight the brake caliper bleeding screw, and put the dust cap in their place.

IMPORTANT NOTE: All the time check the brake fluid level in the brake system reservoir, and fill up if necessary!

10. Push the brake pedal firmly for 4 - 5 times to the floor, and maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling.
11. Continue with the front right wheel. Another person remove the dust cap and loose the brake caliper bleeding screw until the brake pedal goes to the floor. At this moment maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling, and tight the brake caliper bleeding screw. Use a plastic hose: one end connected to the brake caliper bleeding screw, and another end inside a recovery bottle for used brake fluid.
12. Repeat steps no.#10 and no.#11 until no air flows through the brake caliper bleeding screw. Tight the brake caliper bleeding screw, and put the dust cap in their place.

IMPORTANT NOTE: All the time check the brake fluid level in the brake system reservoir, and fill up if necessary!

13. Push the brake pedal firmly for 4 - 5 times to the floor, and maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling.
14. Continue with the front left wheel. Another person remove the dust cap and loose the brake caliper bleeding screw until the brake pedal goes to the floor. At this moment maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling, and tight the brake caliper bleeding screw. Use a plastic hose: one end connected to the brake caliper bleeding screw, and another end inside a recovery bottle for used brake fluid.
15. Repeat steps no.#13 and no.#14 until no air flows through the brake caliper bleeding screw. Tight the brake caliper bleeding screw, and put the dust cap in their place.
16. Now the brakes are bleeded. Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir. Fill up with new brake fluid until "MAX" level is reached. Put back the brake reservoir cap.
17. Test the car brake system. The brake pedal movement no more than 1/3 of total stroke until the floor, when brake pedal is applied. Maximum admissible is 1/2 of total stroke.

Dec 06, 2010 | Volkswagen Golf Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do you set up new rear calipers on a 1999 mk4 golf


Are the rear calipers already fitted? I will assume not 1) open the hood and locate the brake master cylinder and brake reservoir. Open the filler cap. Put a piece of polythene Supermarket bag will across the opening and tighted the filler cap over it. This will provide a vacuum seal to the reservoir to prevent too much brake fluid loss whilst working on the brakes. 2) Jack up one of the rear wheels and remove it. Loosen by half a turn the flexible brake hose union in the old caliper. Put a piece of towel on the ground beneath the brake assembly to catch any brake fluid. About midway along the hose pinch it closed. It is very important that you use something rounded on both sides to do this to prevent damaging the hose. A self clamping wrench has jaws that are too sharp for the job. If you have a couple of drill bits of about 8mm to 10mm in diameter that you can put one either side of the tube and then set the self clamping wrench to squeeze these on to the hose with moderate force; enough to prevent fluid loss. Slacken now the brake fluid bleed screw in the caliper. Put a broad blade screw driver between the disc and the face of the brake pad and twist to lever the caliper pistons back into the body of the caliper. As you do so brake fluid will be forced out the slackened bleed screw. Remove the brake pads when suitably slackened. Undo the two very large bolts that secure the caliper body to the hub assembly of the car and lift it free. The following process avoids the need of disturbing the top brake pipe union: taking the weight of the caliper in the hand it should be possible to unscrew it from the previously loosened end of the brake hose union end as if it were a massive nut. 3) Fitting the new caliper is matter of again taking its weight in the hand and screwing it on to the brake hose union end. Do it only hand tight initially. Put a light smear of copper ease grease on the back of each pad...do not contaminate the disc or pad face. Copperease between the caliper piston faces and the pad backs prevents brake squeal. Some new pads are supplied with an anti squeal compound to be smeared on the pad backs in which case the Copperease can be omitted. Slip the brake pads into the caliper body and also fit the bleed screw finger tight. Fit the caliper with pads over the disc the disc and insert the mounting bolts. Tighten the large mounting bolts to the specified torque (very very tight). Tighten the hose union end with a spanner and take off the improvised hose clamp. Tighten the bleed screw moderately. 4) Under the hood remove the polythene temporary seal from under the reservoir filler cap. Pump the brake pedal slowly until some resistance is felt. Check the fluid reservoir level and if low top it back up to max. 5)With a 'helper' do the following: have them press on the brake pedal. Undo the caliper bleed screw about a quarter of turn to let the air out and then re- tighten it again. Your helper should only now allow the brake pedal up slowly. Have them press on the pedal again. Again loosen off the bleed screw fractionally to expel air bubbles. Keep repeating this process until brake fluid emerges for some time with absolutely no sign of air bubbles. Your helper should also report that the brake pedal feels hard. Make sure the caliper pitons have extended and that the pads have been pressed hard onto the disc. Tighten the bleed screw securely. 6) Check the reservoir under the hood, the level may have gone down, if so top it up to the max line with brake fluid. 7) repeat steps 1 to 6 on the other side of the car.
As a final check ensure that no polythene has been left beneath the reservoir cap and that the cap is refitted. Check that all clamps have been removed, that brake hose unions, bleed screws and caliper mounting bolts are all tight and that the brake pedal action reaches a point of hard resistance when stood on. Any signs of springy softness in the brakes means that there is still air left in the system that will need further bleeding. Ensure everything is clean and that nothing is leaking. Job done

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2 Answers

When replacing the brake pads on a 2001 oldsmobile alero do you have to bleed the brakes? and how do you do that? One website said all you have to do is take out 2 bolts (we did that and cant get the...


Normally, just a pad replacement would not necessitate brake bleeding. Most calipers are held on by two bolts, so I think the website was right. The reason you could not get the caliper off (and I am guessing here) is that you did not push the piston(s) back into their bores before trying to remove the caliper. Pushing the pistons back is always necessary to give you enough room to get the new pads into place. A C-clamp does this job well. Before pushing on the pistons with the C-clamp, you need to remove the cover of the brake fluid reservoir under the hood and put a towel or something over the top of it. Pushing the pistons in will push brake fluid back through the lines into the reservoir and will often cause it to overflow.

It sounds like the bolt you removed that started the brake fluid dripping was in fact what is called a bleeder valve. Now that the brake lines have been opened, you may in fact have to bleed the brakes after you get the new pads installed.

Oct 22, 2009 | 2001 Oldsmobile Alero

2 Answers

How do I bleed the front brakes on a 2004 audi a4 quattro?


For front brake pads replacement you need only usually wrench set, inclusive 7 mm allen key also. But for rear brake pads replacement you need obligatory a special caliper piston pressing tool, in order to press back rear caliper piston with parking brake automatic adjustment!!! For front brake pads. First you must verify yours front brake disc diameter: 280 mm or 288 mm. (On my car y have 288 mm). After that you can buy the brake pads (with wear sensor). For change front brake pads you must raise vehicle, remove wheels, extract the retaining spring of the caliper, and remove the caliper as follow: 1. Do not disconnect the brake hose from the caliper, and do not allow the caliper to hang by the brake hose! 2. Remove top and bottom caps (on back side of the caliper) for access to guide pins, then unbolt and remove them from the brake carrier. Remove the caliper. 3. Now you must thoroughly clean the brake calipers (free of grease). 4. Remove outer brake pad from brake carrier. 5. Pull inner brake pad out of brake caliper piston. 6. Check up the brake fluid level on the reservor, and emptying if neccessary! 7. Push piston back into brake caliper housing. 8. Install inner brake pad (with expanding spring) in brake caliper piston. (Arrow marked on pad - if exist, must point in direction of brake disc rotation when vehicle is moving forward). 9. Install outer brake pad into brake carrier. 10. Bolt brake caliper housing to brake carrier using two guide pins. Tightening torque is 25 Nm. 11. Install both caps. 12. Insert retaining spring into brake caliper housing. Important: Depress the brake pedal firmly several times while the car is stationary so that the brake pads adjust to their normal operating positions!!! Check brake fluid level and top up if neccessary!!!

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1 Answer

Changing 4 calipers and there is no oil com out when try to bleed


The master cylinder supplies the pressure to the brake fluid that travels between the maste brake cylinder resevoir and the brake caliper pistons (through the brake lines. If the master cylinder fails there will be insufficient compression of the brake fluid to make the calipers operate as designed. Leaks in the brake lines and/or cylinders is a possibility, and unrelated to functionality of the master cylinder. Also, pistons located in the brake calipers can form a corrosion ring on their inside walls if there is breakdown in the brake fluid or moisture that gets into the lines. Operating the vehicle when there is insufficient brake fluid in the master cylinder resevoir can also lead to air getting into the brake lines, causing bad working brakes. Air compresses more than brake fluid, and the master cylinder isn't designed to compress air in the brake lines. Sounds like a bad case of "lack of maintenance", as opposed to bad advice from the mechanics. That said, there's no excuse for bad installation. But, it's tough to improperly install a brake line since they are nothing more than hollow metal tubes. There should be no rubber connectors installed in the brake lines. When bleeding the brake lines one must remove all of the trapped air before you will see any fluid appear. If the valves in the master cylinder are not properly operating the master cylinder will not allow the brake fluid to get into the brake lines.

Hope this helps.

Jun 13, 2009 | 1999 Volkswagen Passat

1 Answer

No brakes after changing brake caliper & bleeding system


Sounds like you still have air in your brake lines. Make sure all your brake lines are tight. Then bleed again. Bleed the trouble side first, meaning right side, then go to front left, back left then back right, make sure that your brake fluid is also full

Feb 11, 2009 | 2004 Toyota Tacoma

1 Answer

Can't seem to bleed brakes


as long as it is foamy it indicates you have air trapped inside that one caliper make sure that the bleeder valve is closing all the way chances are you are sucking air back into the caliper through the bleeder or you have a leaking brake hose or even the caliper ccould be leaking, basicaly look for fluid leaks

Nov 24, 2008 | 1986 Isuzu Pickup

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