Question about 1997 Subaru Legacy

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Bubbles in overflow tank and no heat

I was told I have a exhuast leak into my cooling system(bubbles in overflow tank) and I get cool air from the vents when I turn on the heat. Are these problems related and any suggestions on how to fix them

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If you have exhaust in your radiator that means that the head gasket or one of the cylinder heads has a blown gasket or warped or cracked head or heads,you need to get the heads removed to see whats the cause as for the coolair it could be the heater isnt turning in as the vents should still blow hot air when you turn the heat on,fix the heads first then sort the heater when the big problem is fixed

Posted on Nov 13, 2009

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Is the car also overheating. This could be a possible head gasket problem. Easyly detected by doing a block test.

Posted on Nov 13, 2009

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1 Answer

Car keeps over heating and sputters installed new thermostat flushed coolant what else could it be,sensor?


You need to check coolant circulation and coolant temperature. Also check for active bubbles in coolant even cold. Its possible there is poor coolant flow, poor cooling of the coolant, or the head or gasket have been damaged and are allowing compression to escape into the cooling system and superheat it. This will be seen as greay steaming bubbles floating up in the radiator or overflow tank and popping despite the fact the tank or radiator is full and not that hot, the bubbles will be steam pockets escaping as air and extremely scalding! (Danger!).

The tools Id use are a IR temo gun to check actual coolant temp and possibly temp across the hoses and the radiator itself. Then you want to verify all cooling components (fans, shrouds, thermostat, water pump(s)) are all doing their jobs. If all that checks out and system is full and holds pressure, youll wanna check internal engine leaks making temperature go high.

May 04, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to burp your cooling system after replacing parts (works for ALL cars)


There's a common misconception that if part of a car's cooling system fails, the failing part can be replaced, the system closed up, fluid topped off, and the car will be ready to go. Many people have overheating problems, replace the offending component (thermostat, radiator, etc), top off the fluid, and then wonder why they still overheat.

This is because when the cooling system (which operates as a sealed system) is opened up and new components are installed, air bubbles become trapped in the system when it's reassembled. Coolant is added, but the bubbles displace some of the system's volume and become trapped in the cooling system.

The way to alleviate the problem is to burp the cooling system. It's easy to do, and only takes half an hour to an hour. It can be done at home very easily.

The first step is to reassemble the system after you replace whatever components are failing. Tighten all clamps, connect all hoses, and then fill the radiator or coolant holding tank, and fill the overflow reservoir to the indicated level (there's a small hose that typically runs from the radiator flange where the cap is positioned, over to the overflow container). Find the thermostat (trace the lower radiator hose back to the engine from the radiator - where it attaches to the engine is either exactly where, or very near, the location of the thermostat). Jack up the car so that the thermostat is pointed upward (the hose would be attaching at a downward angle). Now start the car.

You jack it up in this way so that the thermostat points upward. The thermostat will open downward in this position. Watch your temperature gauge as it rises to, and then beyond, the normal operating temperature. If it is rising very slowly, you can rev the engine, or hold it at 2000 RPM or so, to help build the heat. Eventually the engine will begin to heat up beyond normal and the gauge will climb. This is what you want. Allow it to climb to somewhere between 2/3 and 3/4 of the way to a full overheat, and then shut the engine off. Allow it to cool, and then CAREFULLY open the radiator cap. You'll hear a purge of pressure, and will probably see bubbling in the overflow container. Check the level of the coolant in the overflow and the radiator, top them off as needed, and repeat this procedure. Keep doing so until the car no longer overheats. Now, take it for a drive around the block a few times, and see if it overheats then (sometimes putting the engine under load will cause it to overheat even when it won't while sitting in the driveway). If it does not overheat, you are done. If it does, pull over, turn off the engine, and turn on the heat full blast (this will extract heat from the engine). Get the car home and burp it again.

Why are you doing this? Here's why. Those air bubbles in the system that I mentioned are the root of your evil. When you start the engine, the water pump spins and circulates the coolant (and air bubbles) throughout the engine. At some point, those bubbles come to the thermostat, which stays closed until the car gets to a certain temperature, at which point it opens and allows the coolant to go to the radiator to cool off. When the air bubbles get to the closed thermostat, they get stuck. In turn, having the bubbles pinned against the back side of the thermostat keeps it from opening since the system is pressurized and the thermostat can't open against the pressure of the bubbles. This is why the car begins to overheat. By waiting until you are most of the way to a full overheat, you get as many bubbles stuck there as possible.

Once you allow the car to cool enough that the coolant won't explode out of the radiator when you open the cap, you can open it. This relieves the pressure in the cooling system and allows the thermostat to open. The bubbles travel through the thermostat and hose to the radiator, burble their way to the top, and "burp" out of the cap's opening. With the bubbles out, the coolant level drops some (which is why the coolant as to be topped off), and you repeat the process since the coolant doesn't always follow the same pathway. You want to be sure that all the bubbles are removed from the system, so you do this a few times.

Hopefully this will help you with overheating problems and with diagnosing future issues. I know this is listed under Chevy cars, but that is only because I had to select something, and those are commonly owned cars. This process is important on ANY car, regardless of manufacturer or engine.

on Dec 03, 2009 | Chevrolet Blazer Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The heat is not working on my 2000 Malibu what might be the problem


This solution is for the 3100/3400 engine.
Air in your cooling system. There is a vertical black pipe with a bleader screw on the top. This pipe feeds directly into your water pump. It feeds your heater core and circulates coolant to your throttle body. Start the car, loosen the bleader screw. Air should come out. Rev the engine occasionally to push more bubbles out of the system. Keep an eye on the coolant level in your overflow tank. Once you get the air blead out check your heater.
Air in the system is systematic of a faulty head gasket or leaking hose.

Nov 19, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 2000 chrysler voyager radiator fluid bubbles in radiator overflow tank evn when cold nd when turning over. I just had head gasket replaced whats going on


I suspect a crack in the head or block. The cooling system is suppose to be closed so any air has to be coming from somewhere - if the head gasket is good then the air is likely to be coming from a crack. A pressure test will confirm if your system is not air tight. That is if you are seeing bubbles in the radiator water if you just mean you are losing water through the overflow then it might just be the radiator cap needs replacing as it is not sealing the system when it gets hot.

Jan 23, 2013 | 2000 Chrysler Grand Voyager

1 Answer

Air bubbles in the coolant system causing the car to run hot


If you are seeing air bubbles, then the cooling system still has air pockets in it. Loosen the overflow cap and leave it that way for a few days while you drive.Keep the heater turned on at the max heat level. Roll a window down if necessary. Check and top up the overflow bucket daily and top up as necessary. The bubbles should disappear after a few days, then you can tighten the cap. This should also solve your no heat problem. Once the bubbles are gone you can tighten the cap.

If the problem doesn't fix itself in a week, you should have the car looked at for a possible bad head gasket, which would force air into the cooling system. Hope this helps.

Feb 20, 2012 | 1999 Cadillac DeVille

4 Answers

Just replaced my water pump but my car is overheating. could the water pump be defective?


I would say that is possible, but unlikely, if you just put on new one, this could be most likely your thermostat is stuck or just plain bad. If it is over heating instantly, and your sure your water pump is operating correctly, then it could be the thermostat.

Jun 13, 2011 | BMW 323 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do you get at yor cabin filter on a 2001 ford taruse car. if it is pluged will that stop the heat from comeing full blast i have heat but not as hot as it should be.in the coolent pot there is little...


hi from uk the problem your symptoms describe esecially the bubbles that are appearing in the coolant header tank would suggest that the poor heat in car is due to air locking in the heater and this is most probaby the air bubbles you see in head tank are also finding their way into heater matrix via heater hoses may i suggest that asap you visit garage for a cooling system pressure test because theseair bubbles should not be appearing and is a sgn that you may have a cylinder head gasket in early stage of failure and what these bubbles are is compression in cylinder/s is leaking via gasket into the coolant system and emmiting in the head tank however i do say early sign so a compression test on cooling system will confirm whether or not ? considering cars age? it is not uncommon especially if high milage or any history in past of overheating ? hope this helps

Dec 23, 2009 | 2001 Ford Taurus

4 Answers

Still Over heating after many trys!!!


I would flush out the whole system. sounds like something is building back-pressure. If you do re-chande the thermostat, get a 'fail-safe' one that remains open if it fails. If this does not solve the problem, it may be a blown head gasket...this would also cause back pressure in the cooling system by allowing the the fireing pressure to escape through to the cooling system.

Jun 21, 2009 | 1989 Jeep Cherokee

1 Answer

Stalling problems


Remove the raidator cap while running or watch the overflow tank for bubbles. If you see bubbles either way, most likely your cause of the overheating is a leaking head gasket. If you have a cooling system pressure tester, pump up the cooling system and see if it looses pressure, if it doesn't hold pressure, again bad head gasket.

Jun 23, 2008 | 1989 Ford Crown Victoria

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