Question about 1993 Mercury Capri

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Equal amounts of water present in all 4 cylinders when looking through spark plug holes. what could have caused this?

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First, there may be confusion among us regarding what you mean by "spark plug holes" Are you talking about: 1) With the plugs out, looking into the actual cylinders or, 2) You're talking about removing the plug WIRES and looking down into the plug "tunnels" (which are the holes between the cams where the wires run down to the plugs). If you mean (1) - blown head gasket/cracked head, etc, but if you mean (2) (and I'm taking a wild guess thinking that's what you mean) most likely your plug wires, which snap into the top holes of the "tunnels" are probably cracked or not seating properly. I had this problem when my Capri was parked outside for several months, at one point getting buried by a blizzard. The next spring it wouldn't start and barely even fired at all. I replaced plugs and wires (while also drying out the "tunnels" using paper towels to simply absorb the water little by little...uh, BEFORE removing the plugs too by the way) and bingo, she fired right up and ran like a raped ape. The new wires eliminated the water problem and the tunnels have remained dry ever since.

Posted on Aug 22, 2010

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2 reasons:

If water has entered your fuel tank, it will fill up bottom first water has higher density than petrol/gas tank and the fuel pump, whose inlet from the fuel tank is near the bottom of the tank, will be drawn first by the fuel pump when the engine has been cranked the first time, when anyone tried to start the ignition, the fuel is to be delivered in equal quantity to each cylinder.

Check the fuel tank first by removing the joint of the outlet of the tank to check what pours out?

This cannot happen by accident, but somebody has deliberately poured water into the fuel tank!! Its just not practical, unless there were any flood and the vehicle was stranded with the water level high enough to be over the engine block.

However whatever the case may be, there's water in your fuel tank, and has to be drained entirely, dried ot plus removing the outlet from the tank to remove water from the pipeline &/or some amount of fuel forced into the intake to remove the accumulated water ............sodeep

Posted on Nov 12, 2009

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You have either a blown head gasket, a cracked block or a cracked head. The head has to be removed to fix the cheapest problem, the head gasket so, make sure the block & head get checked too.

Posted on Nov 12, 2009

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Have a spark plug not firing.


Are you sure it's actually a plug?
Are you getting oil on the plug?
The plug may be firing but you may be losing compression which gives the symptoms of a misfire. As you've changed the plug, lead and coil this points to to a problem elsewhere.

Your first course of action should be to get a mobile mechanic carry out a diagnostic check for you.

To put your mind at rest, do a 2nd compression test using a light oil squirted into the bores:

Doing a Compression Test
Warm the engine. Remove all the spark plugs.
Get a pencil and piece of paper to note down the readings.
Put the compression tester into the No1 cylinder and crank the engine for 10 seconds.
Note down the compression reading.
Repeat process for all cylinders.

Here's an illustration of what you may expect on a 4 cylinder engine:
Cylinder 1 2 3 4
psi 125 122 120 124

125 is the uppermost figure for that engine. Here, this engine is fine. There's a slight variation in psi figures, but that's perfectly normal.

Here's the same engine:
Cylinder 1 2 3 4
psi 110 112 114 112

The psi reading is down. However, as all the figures are pretty much equal it doesn't indicate head /gasket problems. It may point towards worn pistons or burnt valves.

Now consider these psi readings:
Cylinder 1 2 3 4
psi 125 84 86 124

There's more than a 10% drop - a difference - between cylinder 1 and 2, and cylinders 3 and 4.
The compression readings for cylinders 2 and 3 is down; low. There's something clearly wrong.

It suggests that there is a defective head gasket between cylinders 2 and 3 or a crack in the cylinder head. The rising piston compresses the gases which escape into the adjoining cylinder via the defective gasket or cracked head.

However, it could also mean that there is a problem with the valves (burnt/not seating properly) or perhaps piston / ring problems.

A burnt valve - it's usually the exhaust valve as they bear the brunt of the combustion - can cause a reduction in engine power simply because the combustion process isn't occurring properly. Compressed air/fuel gets squeezed out of that cylinder because of the damaged valve . There even may be a misfire - a surge as the car runs.

Worn or broken piston rings allow compressed gases to leak past into the crankcase. A compressed crankcase can force oil out of the dipstick tube. The pressure in the crankcase will leak to atmosphere anywhere it can find an outlet.

The 2nd Compression Test
The second compression test is known as a 'wet test'. The first compression test was the dry test because no oil was added to the bores. The second 'wet' test can give an indication of whether it is the rings or valves at fault (though bear in mind rings and valves do not cause overheating or water in the coolant symptoms).

Spray a liberal amount of light penetrating oil into each cylinder - aim for the cylinder walls, not the centre of the piston. You want the oil to run down the cylinder wall and around the piston to form a seal.

Place a rag over each spark plug hole and spin the engine to eject the surplus oil.

Then carry out a full compression test noting down the results.

Here's the previous results with the 2nd compression readings added:
Cylinder 1 2 3 4
psi 125 84 86 124
Wet 128 112 110 126

The readings have increased. This because the oil sprayed into the bores has formed a temporary seal around the piston, thereby enabling the compression to be raised. It also indicates that the bores/rings are worn on cylinder 2 and 3 - the 'oil seal' has increased the readings but is still low in comparison with cylinders 1 and 2.

This could also indicate that in addition to worn rings there is also burnt valves. Oil cannot form a seal around a valve. A worn or split valve will cause a low compression reading and misfiring symptoms.
Compressions readings should be taken in conjunction with other symptoms. It will help you identify the problem:

Low compression readings between two adjoining cylinders point towards a head gasket/head fault if your vehicle has shown signs of coolant loss, coolant in the oil system - mayonnaise, overheating, rough running and lack of power.

If those symptoms are not present it points towards burnt valves/piston rings. A worn engine may be difficult to start and pressurise the crankcase, but it doesn't cause overheating problems.

Feb 09, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where are the Spark Plugs located in a 2004 Lincoln Navigator?


Hello, first how many miles do you have on this Lincoln? On that 4.6 L V8 engine they do have spark plugs but each plug has it's own spark coil located on a long rubber plug. You will see four little coils on each side of the engine. There will wires going in to the individual coils. There will be a bracket the holds the coils in place with a small 9 or 10 mm nut. Remove the nut, and gently pull on eac coil. There Hello, first how many miles do you have on this Lincoln? If you have over 120 thousand miles on this engine then it might need new spark plugs. On that 4.6 L V8 engine they do have spark plugs but each plug has it's own spark plug coil. You will see four little coils on each side of the engine. There will wires going in to the individual coils. There will be a bracket the holds the coils in place with a small 9 or 10 mm nut. Remove the nut, and gently pull on each coil. There a long rubber plug that fit in each spark hole. These rubber plugs are about 4 1/2 to 5 inches long.


Before removing the plug use an air hose with 50 to 60 lbs of pressure to blow each spark plug hole out which might have foreign object in the hole. Why, if you remove the spark plugs, and there is foreign material in that plug hole. Guess what, that stuff will fall into the combustion camber.



Then you will really have some problem. How fix if stuff fall into the combustion camber.

Squirt small amount of oil in the combustion camber, unplug all the coils and clear out there plug hole. Now remove all the spark plugs. Now, you can crank the engine and will the little amount in that cylinder that has the junk in it. The oil will wet the foreign debrie, and blow it out the spark plug hole. Then use a clean rag with with some oil it with a long screw driver to clean that spark plug hole Be careful that don't push the foreign material back into the combustion camber. Do this several time with little amount of oil.



Now, you can install the new spark plugs. On the spark plugs threads use some anti-shiz grease. Why squirt oil into the combustion camber? The oil is used to seal the rings on the piston to increase the cylinder compression. Just a small amount goes a long ways. GB...stewbison
a long rubber plug that fit in each spark hole. There rubber plug are about 4 1/2 to 5 inchs long.

Before removing the plug use an air hose with 50 to 60 lbs of pressure to blow each spark plug hole out which might foreign object in the hole. Why, if you remove the spark plugs, and there is foreign material in that plug hole. Guess what, that suff will fall into the combustion camber.
Then you will really have some problem. How fix if stuff fall into the combustion camber.
Squirk small of oil in the combustion camber, unplug all the coils and clear out there plug hole. Now remove all the spartk plugs. Now, you can crank the engine and will the little amount in that cylinder that has the junk in it. The oil will wet the foreign debrie and blow it out the spark plug hole. Do this serveral time with little amount of oil.

Now, you install the new spark plugs. On the spark plugs threads use some anti-shiz grease.
Just a small amount goes a long ways. GB...stewbison

Sep 12, 2011 | 2004 Lincoln Navigator

3 Answers

I have a 1984 Ranger 2.0 engine. It belonged to my girlfriend who let it sit up a while. I got it to crank and run and started driving it. Everyonce in a while it would loose power and one time backfired....


check the oxygen intake system. I'm not sure but your car is eighter the caburator or fuel injected.

in anycase the white smoke and cuting off, backfiring and loosing power is cause of the caburator or oxygen sensor (in fuel injected cars).


get your oxygen intake system serviced. it fits your problems perfectly. seeing the age of your car I'm betting its caburator, have that serviced or replaced.

Apr 04, 2011 | Ford Ranger Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Error code reads #4 cylinder misfire??? possible probs & fixes


I'm assuming your trouble code is P0304 and you have the 5 cylinder engine.
take out the spark plug, does it look normal? No foreign materials on it, like coolant or oil? If it has coolant on it, you have a blown head gasket.

If plug looks ok, put the wire back on the end of it, pull the wires off the other plugs, hold the #4 plug with wire up against the engine to ground the plug threads. Have someone crank the engine while you look for a spark. If no spark, try putting the plug into another wire. If still no spark, plug is bad. If it sparks in another wire, wire #4 or coil #4 is bad. In this last case, you can swap wires with another coil to determine if it's the wire or the coil that is bad.

If #4 plug sparked in wire #4, ignition is working and problem is with the cylinder. Run a compression test on all cylinders. You can borrow or rent the tester. Take all plugs out and screw the tester into each plug hole one at a time. Crank the engine a few revolutions and read the gage. Write down the pressure, release it from the gage and go on to the next cylinder. If #4 comes up short, you have a burned exhaust valve or blown head gasket.

Please let me know if you have any questions or need more instructions.

Nov 01, 2010 | 2006 Hummer H3

1 Answer

What does code p0304 mean for a dodge 2002 intrepid?


P0304 means there is/was a misfire on cylinder #4. Depending on whether it was stored or if it is active, the cause of the misfire may or may not be present at this moment. You should check the condition of the spark plugs (especially cylinder #4) and if everything looks okay, it could be a problem with the fuel injectors, carbon buildup in the cylinder, a sticking valve, or something more serious (cylinder head, gasket, block).

Hope this helps!

Oct 17, 2010 | Dodge Intrepid Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The freeze plug came out and water drained.Now when I fill truck back up with water .It runs out of spark plugs holes.


what exactly caused the freeze plug to come out if it froze hard enough to push out freeze plug then it most likely has caused other damage the only way water is coming out of plug holes is the water is entering the cylinders i suspect you either have a cracked cylinder head or a cracked cylinder wall i have seen this on one other engine were it froze and bursted the cylinder wall i reccomend removing cylinder head for further inspection

Sep 13, 2010 | 2001 Chevrolet S-10

2 Answers

Mis fire cylinder


Cylinder misfires come in many different flavors. Sometimes only 1 cylinder will fail, sometimes more, and sometimes it will jump around. The lesser amount of cylinders you have, the more noticeable the misfire will be. In all cases it depends on the condition of the electronics, and hardware (i.e.; spark plugs, spark plug wires, coil/coil pack(s), etc.) In my experience, the lesser amount of electronics you have, the easier solving the problem will be. This answer applies only to gas powered internal combustion engines. Not diesel powered engines. First you want to make sure that ALL hoses and electrical connectors/wires are located in their correct place, and connected properly. Next to identify the problem. When does it miss? At idle or throughout the driving range (while at idle and in motion). Is it intermittent (does the miss occur randomly)? Does the vehicle seem to have 1 miss? Or more than one miss (This is more easily noted on vehicles equipped with motors that contain a smaller amount of cylinders)? Now to explore each question, I will use a hypothetical situation. I have a small car with a 4 cylinder motor. I drove it home last night, and when I started it this morning, it had a definite miss. To identify which of the cylinder(s) are misfiring, no actual tools are required. To find which cylinder(s) are having the problem, simply open the hood with the key "off," and check to see if anything is loose (i.e. a spark plug wire). If everything is snug, try removing one of the plug wires (NOTE: Only remove 1 plug wire at a time!). Then reach inside the car and try to start it. If you have a 4 cylinder motor any difference will become immediately apparent. In fact, most times the car will fail to start and stay running. If the plug wire you removed made no difference in the way the car runs, that means that cylinder is not firing. Replace the wire to its original location, and make sure that it is snug. Try another wire. Continue this process until you find the cylinder(s) that are causing the problem. (NOTE: Keep notes on which cylinder(s) are having the problem, and how the car behaves.) Once you have identified which cylinders are having the problem, it is now time to determine the source of the problem. On newer cars (approx. 1985-present, depending on make and model) the problem can be more complex to try and solve. In this scenario, I am using an older car. Now it is time to see if the spark plug is getting any spark. To test this, remove the spark plug wire from the bad cylinder's spark plug, and set it against something metal on the motor, for best results, place the metal tip of the wire slighty away from the metal object (like the valve cover), but close enough for the spark to arc across (approx. 1/4 inch is best). Start the car. If you look at the tip of the wire and there is a spark arcing across the wire to the motor, that wire is transmitting spark. If it does not, skip down to the next paragraph. Since the wire is transmitting spark, the next thing to check would be the spark plug. (At this point you will need tools) Remove the sparkplug from the misfiring cylinder, and check for detonation of the tip of the plug (plug tip is destroyed), corrosion(white chalky residue), and foulage (if the plug is wet, and it smells like gas, that means that there is fuel getting to the plug, but the plug is not igniting it. If the residue is oily, then there is oil seeping in through to the combustion chamber. If it is not oily or wet, but is black, that means that the plug is carbon fouled, either from too much fuel (a rich fuel mixture), or that the spark plugs have not been cleaned/ replaced in a long time. To test the spark plug, plug it back into its wire, and set it again against something metal (NOTE: Make sure the location yout choose, has the least chance of falling over and into other moving parts). Start the car, and check for spark at the end of the plug, if there is no spark, the plug is dead, and needs to be replaced. If it does spark, that means that there is either a fuel delivery problem, sensor malfunction, or vacuum/vacuum hose leak, and not a spark issue

Nov 06, 2009 | 1996 Ford Taurus

3 Answers

Need help with diagnostic codes


P0300 Multiple/Random Misfire detected.
P0301 Misfire detected - Cyls. 1-4.
P0302 Misfire detected - Cyls. 1-4.

Jul 25, 2009 | 2006 Kia Rio

2 Answers

2004 S40 Light Smoke


Most likely it is oil smoke, if the smoke is black, and the check engine warning light is on, it could be over fueling for numerous reasons.How many miles on the engine?

Nov 13, 2008 | 2004 Volvo S40

2 Answers

Loss compression


How to Test Engine CompressionAn engine depends on an equal compression reading in each cylinder to run smoothly. If poor compression exits in one or more cylinders it can cause a rough idle condition and low power. A compression test can be performed to check wear or internal damage. To start a engine compression test gauge is needed. There are two types of gauge styles, one threads into the spark plug hole which is more accurate. The other style of gauge is constructed with a rubber plug that is meant to be pressed against the spark plug hole, this style of gauge is difficult to use. To perform a engine cylinder compression test follow the steps below.
  • Remove ignition coil connector or ignition system fuse to disable power to the ignition system
  • Test ignition system to ensure that the power to the system has been disabled
  • Remove #1 cylinder spark plug and insert compression gauge, most gauges have a hose attachment that is installed into the spark plug hole with the gauge connecting to the gauge hose.
compression_gauge.jpg
Engine Cylinder Compression Gauge
  • After the compression gauge has been inserted, use the starter to crank the engine over for about five seconds. Use about the same five seconds to test the remaining cylinders.
  • Record the compression reading as each cylinder is tested
  • Remove the compression gauge and reinsert the spark plug
  • Follow this procedure until all cylinders have been tested
  • Compare cylinders compression reading, all readings should be within about 5% of each other
If low compression exists a cylinder malfunction exits and further inspection is required. Possible causes for a low compression condition are: burned intake or exhaust valve, broken piston or piston ring, broken valve spring or a blown head gasket.

May 31, 2008 | 2000 Hyundai Tucson

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