Question about 1988 Jeep Comanche

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Worked 1 day, next day no power 4cyl 4 speed, slow starting,-normal.compression 120 all cyls,but cannot get out driveway, slight uphill grade,we have checked timing plus other sensors

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  • cheekytiger May 11, 2010

    did you check the fuel filter for clogs? are you getting air?

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Why did my 1988 jeep comanche lose all power uphill and on flat ground?

Posted on Feb 07, 2010

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Firing order for rocam1.6


A six cylinder in-line engine has a power impulse every 720 degrees/6 i.e. 120 degrees of crankshaft rotation. The crankshaft has six crank-throws placed at 120 degrees out of phase with one another, which can be arranged only in three planes. Therefore, the crankpin phasing is arranged in pairs. For heavy-duty diesel engines, seven journals and bearings are provided, at each end and between adjacent crankpins. For petrol engines only 4 or 5 main journals are provided. The firing order with the crankshaft arrangement shown in the attached figure is considered. With piston 1 at the top of the compression stroke, its opposite piston 6 is at the top of its exhaust stroke. Rotation of crankshaft through 120 degrees brings pistons 2 and 5 to their TDC and either one of these can be arrangement to complete a compression stroke. If piston 5 is arranged to be at the end of compression and at the start of its power stroke, then piston 2 must be on its exhaust stroke. Rotation of crankshaft through second 120 degrees positions pistons 3 and 4 at the TDC, so either one of these can be on the compression stroke. If piston 3 is made to be on compression, piston 4 must be on its exhaust stroke. A third rotation of 120 degrees brings pistons 1 and 6 back again to TDC, where piston 6 is arranged to be on the compression and piston 1, therefore, be on its exhaust stroke. A fourth 120 degrees rotation brings pistons 2 and 5 to their TDC. Piston 2 is now on its compression and piston 5 on its exhaust stroke. Rotation of crankshaft through fifth 120 degrees brings piston 3 and 4 to TDC. Piston 4 is on compression and piston 3 on its exhaust stroke. Final rotation of 120 degrees completes the 720 degrees displacement of crankshaft and brings the pistons into positions for the next cycle. This cycle provides a firing order of 1, 5, 3, 6, 2, 4. If the phasing of paired crank-throws 3 and 4 and 2 and 5 are interchanged, then a second equally suitable firing-order of 1, 4, 2, 6, 3, 5 is achieved. This arrangement provides excellent dynamic balance and evenness of torque, and is preferred for engines larger than 2.5 liters provided length is not a prime consideration.

Sep 28, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Car surging


Is the car equipped with the Automatic Transmission?
If so, read on.
Otherwise skip to the end and answer some questions.

POSSIBLE SCENARIO:
I have observed a condition where my car surges slightly when the torque-converter clutch (TCC) cycles between lock and unlock when driving on an uphill grade.
First some basics and history that will explain why the TCC is used.

Engine, Torque Converter, TCC, and Transmission relationship--
The TCC allows for a solid connection between the engine and transmission which allows the input to the transmission to rotate at the same speed as the engine.
Without a TCC, there is slippage between the engine and automatic transmission. The slippage is greatest at low engine RPM. That is what allows the engine to run with the automatic transmission in gear, like when you first shift into gear or stop at a stop sign. When the throttle pedal is depressed, the engine RPM begins to increase and the torque converter begins to slip less and less the more the engine RPM increases. The car moves. But even at cruising speeds the torque converter slips slightly. Engine RPM is greater than transmission input RPM, which is realized as slight decrease in fuel efficiency.
When acceleration is complete and a constant speed is being maintained, the engine power output is reduced to the point where the TCC can engage and eliminate any slippage between the engine and transmission. If the car has a tachometer the engagement of the TCC can be verified when a slight reduction in engine RPM observed without a corresponding change in vehicle speed.
One method used to test the operation of the TCC is as follows:
Find a flat section of road where it is safe to perform the test.
Reach a steady speed and keep the gas pedal depressed with one foot. While observing the tachometer (or listening for an increase in engine RPM), with the other foot depress the brake pedal enough to activate the break light switch but not enough to engage the brakes. When the brake light switch activates, the TCC receives a signal to disengage. With the gas pedal being held steady, release the brake pedal and the engine RPM should decrease when the TCC engages.
Old cars with Automatic Transmissions did not use a TCC. I believe the TCC was put in use in an attempt to increase fuel economy.

MY EXPERIENCE WITH SIMILAR SYMPTOMS
The condition that causes that issue on my car is this:
- A slight uphill grade increases the load on the engine.
The car tends to gradually slow and it is necessary to depress the gas pedal to maintain speed.
- Depressing the throttle pedal (manually, or automatically with cruise control engaged) signals the torque converter clutch to unlock when the load increases slightly. (A more drastic load increase would signal the Transmission to downshift to a lower gear.) The corresponding increase in engine RPM and output is enough to compensate for the reduction in speed. When the vehicle speed, engine RPM, and throttle position stabilize to the point that the TCC will engage and the engine RPM will reduce in correspondence with TCC engagement. Now, if the road conditions have not changed, power output is not enough to maintain vehicle speed. With the increased load caused by full engagement between engine and transmission, and the cycle (surging) repeats itself until the road conditions change.

Does that help?
If not:

QUESTIONS
Please define the symptoms.
What are the road conditions when the surge occurs? (A slight uphill grade?)
What is the frequency of the surge?
Does the engine power output have a noticeable surge?
Is there a speed change related to the surge?
Does the tachometer move up and down with little or no change in vehicle speed?
Are all instrument indication in the normal range?
What else has changed?

Good luck!

May 24, 2014 | Subaru Impreza WRX STi Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Hillux d4d 2.7 no start


ahhhh a diesel, that , is a horse of a different color.
not GAS but oil burner engine.! there is no spark on diesels...
it uses huge compression rates to combust.
1: glow plugs dead. (or its controls)
2: low compression,
3: bad fuel ,old fuel , water in fuel.
4: weak battery. old or weak for any reasons. cranks too slow.
5: if EFI , other complex reasons. direct injection is it?

Jan 21, 2014 | 2012 Toyota Sienna Base 7-Passenger...

1 Answer

03 hondaCRV won't start


ok more info... good.
ok , compression is #1 , no amount of spark or fuel makes a dead engine good. (the 120 is low x4 but i bet you didnt do it WOT like the
instructions stated. most cars can do 150 easy. , all my 1.6L do 180.
the reason i ask is the cam belt slips after 50miles and all 4 jugs
drop from 180 to 120 or lower. so did you block the throttle open.
my wild guess is compression really is good and the belt never slipped. yet. (interference engine they are) all of them
so backup and read my post, did you check spark yet.

???????????????????

Jan 09, 2014 | 2003 Honda Civic

1 Answer

My crank shaft is rotating twise the crank shaft. HOW MY 1342 FIRING WILL OCCURE?, I can spare only 30 digree for charge and spark plug contact. THERE ARE ONLY 2+2 CYLINDER. 180 DIGREE APPART KINDLY REPLY...


Your crankshaft turns 2x times the camshaft. Put it this way as # 1 cylinder reaches TDC (top dead center) of the firing/compression stroke, and this will be after a (8 degs BTDC) spark to ignite the air/fuel mix, the # 3 cyl. will be at BDC of the intake stroke and as #1 begins its power down stroke, (during explosion of air/fuel mix), #3 begins its compression up stroke, the #4 cyl. will be coming down with #1 cyl. but #4 will be in the beginning of its intake down stroke, and #2 cyl. will be coming up with #3 but #2will be in its BDC of the exhaust stroke. Which has just fired previously to #1. 1342134213421342 etc. Now the cam turns to open / close the valves; In the outline above, #1 cyl. valves will both be closed. #3 cyl. will have the intake starting to close at this point. #4 cyl. will just be starting to open its intake valve, and #2 will be starting to open its exhaust valve. Is all this clear as mud? So as the crank makes one full rotation (in a 4cyl. engine) only the firing of one cylinder has happened.and at every rotation one cyl. will fire. So #1 at TDC then one full rotation, #1 back at TDC, but this TDC is half of its 4 cycles, (1)Intake, (2)compression, (3)power, (4)exhaust. this 1234 refers to the 4 cycles of the rotation not firing order.

Oct 31, 2010 | 2008 Volkswagen Jetta

1 Answer

Oil spec


1995 HONDA ACCORD 2.7L 6-cyl Engine Code C27A4 C27A1

Engine Oil Grade 1......API All TEMPS......5W-30
Manual Transmission,......SJ All TEMPS......10W-30, optional 10W-40
Automatic Transmission,MPZA......AF2

CAPACITIES:
Engine, with filter..........4.4 liters
Automatic Transmission, MPZA Initial Fill..........2.7 liters
Automatic Transmission, Total Fill
4 speed MPZA..........6 liters
Manual Transmission, ..........1.9 liters

1995 HONDA ACCORD 2.2L 4-cyl Engine Code F22B1 VTEC

Engine Oil Grade 1......API All TEMPS......5W-30
Manual Transmission,......SJ All TEMPS......10W-30, optional 10W-40
Automatic Transmission,A0YA......AF2

CAPACITIES:
Engine, with filter..........4.3 liters
Automatic Transmission, A0YA Initial Fill..........2.4 liters
Automatic Transmission, MP0A Initial Fill..........2.4 liters
Automatic Transmission, Total Fill
4 speed A0YA..........6 liters
4 speed MP0A..........6 liters
Manual Transmission, ..........1.9 liters

Jan 07, 2010 | 1995 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Hi, could someone help me with the firing order of a 1990 Chevy Lumina power pack, please. Thanks


You didn't say what size engine you have, 4cyl. or 6 cyl.
The 4 cyl. is--- 1-3-4-2
The 6 cyl 3.1 is---- 1-2-3-4-5-6----- on the coil pack under the exhaust manifold is----- 1-4-6-3-2-5. If neither of these doesn't work, then you have a different engine.

Mar 12, 2009 | 1992 Chevrolet Lumina

2 Answers

I have a 2000 XK8. It starts and runs great most


Sounds like an ignition switch to me...

Mar 03, 2009 | 1998 Jaguar XK8

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