Question about 2003 Audi S8

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THE TIMING BELT HYDRAULIC TENSIONER IS LEAKING DOWN INTERMITTANTY CAUSING TOP HALF OF BELT LOOP TO BE LOOSE. THIS IS THE THIRD NEW OEM PART WEVE TRIED, NORMAL? OR PART ISSUES.

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Is the belt a fairly new one? if streched it can have the tensioner over extending causing it to leak or check oil preasure if to high will cause seals to leak, if all that is ok, then you may have a part problem

Posted on Oct 08, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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2 Answers

2000 3.2 CONCORDE CHANGED WATER PUMP TIMING MOVED HOW TO FIX


I know on some dodge products the timing belt drives the water pump and has a hydraulic pin tensioner. Generally you will half to press the pin back in bleeding it with a press then lock it in place with a pin and keep it upright up to the reinstall. If this is the case your gonna half to retime your engine aligning all timing marks carefully to avoid bending any valves or damaging pistons and various other internal engine parts. Once they are aligned properly then reinstall the belt and then the hydraulic tensioner and release the pressure on the tensioner by removing the pin holding it down. If this is the kind of system you have genrally dodge recomends changing your belt along with the new water pump.

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Sep 30, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

2004 Pilot timing belt replacement



(for the 105,000 mile timing belt service)

Part List :
-Timing belt: 14400-P8A-A02
-Adjuster automatic (hydraulic tensioner): 14520-P8E-A01
-Adjuster - timing belt: 14510-PGE-A01
-Idler pulley - timing belt: 14550-P8A-A01 (OR) 14550-PGE-A01 (there are 2 numbers listed)
-Alternator/Compressor belt: 38920-P8F-A02
-Power steering belt: 56992-P8A-A01
-O-RING (8.8X1.9): 91302-GE0-000
-Fender trip clips (X7): 91501-S04-003

Special Tools Needed:
Honda Crankshaft Pulley Removal Tool
3/4" breaker bar

Procedure:
-Remove tire and place the Pilot on a jack stand.

-Remove the clips holding the fender liner and lower splash shield in place (x7) and fold them out of the way.

-Make sure the #1 piston is on top dead center using the marks on the crank pulley and lower timing belt cover (19mm in the crank pulley).

-Remove the Alternator-Compressor belt (14mm boxend) & Power Steering belt. (2-12mm and 1-12mm tensioner bolt)

-Loosen the crank pulley. If you have an impact wrench or a long breaker bar it makes it easier to remove the bolt. You will also need a special tool crankshaft pulley holder (50mm) (19mm and special tool).

-Remove the side engine mount bracket (5-14mm bolts).

-Remove the crankshaft pulley.

-Remove the oil dipstick & tube (10mm).

-Remove the front & rear 'upper covers' of the timing belt housing, moving the wire harness out of the way first (5-10mm bolts for each cover).

-Remove the lower cover (7-10mm bolts).

-Remove the engine mount bracket that is bolted to the block (3-14mm bolts).

-Remove the hydraulic tensioner (2-10mm bolts).

-Remove the tensioner pulley (you will reuse the inner sleave) (14mm bolt).

-Remove the idler pulley bolt (14mm bolt with thread locker on it) (I used Loctite 242 during the reinstall because I had it on the shelf).

-Remove the timing belt.

-Before installing a new timing belt, make sure the pulleys, belt guide plate, upper & lower covers are clean and check to see if the crank and cams have rotated (mine did not move).

-The install is the reverse order of removal (make sure you torque everything correctly!)

-The removal of the lock pin in the hydraulic tensioner gave me a little trouble so I used pliers.

-Once the crank pulley is back on, check the lower timing mark (and the cam marks) before the top covers are installed.

on Oct 13, 2014 | 2004 Honda Pilot

1 Answer

How can I tighten chain drive belt?


Chain belt? Don't think so. There is a timing chain and a timing belt. Timing chains on automobiles are generally non adjustable and are tensioned by a hydraulic tensioner and require no attention. Some timing belts are also tensioned by a hydraulic tensioner requiring no service. Some timing belts are also tensioned by a cam tensioner that can be adjusted but are rarely in need of servive unless the timing belt is being replaced

Feb 13, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Timing belt needs tighten can it be done?


the tensioner for the timing belt is a hydraulic tensioner and automatically keeps the belt under tension. Because it is hydraulic it can leak oil which gets on the belt and will destroy it.. For this engine to get maximum life out of the belt, it is recommended to replace the crank shaft seal and the cam shaft seals and the hydraulic tensioner. All idler pulleys should be replaced as well as the bearings do a lot of work . If you want a good long lasting job I suggest an accredited shop that does a lot of your make of engine and spend the money now as it will save in the long run.. The noise is more than likely a idler bearing on the way out.

Apr 26, 2014 | 2002 Mitsubishi Eclipse

2 Answers

Leaking


il can leak at the timing belt from cam shaft seal ,crank shaft seal and hydraulic belt tensioner. Have them all replaced as well as the belt as oil is the main destroyer of rubber timing belts.

Apr 01, 2013 | Mazda 626 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1998 Isuzu 3.5L trooper engine (in 1998 Acura SLX). Old engine had noise. New engine has same noise. Every mechanic with an opinion says that something is not right, but nobody has a tried & true...


What has happened on some of them is the hydraulic tensioner on the timing belt goes out, when the engine is running the belt bounces nicely to the rhythm of the engine causing a knock. Take a peek in the timing cover and make sure the timing belt is tight on the tensioner side.
Hope this helps.

Sam

Nov 03, 2017 | Acura SLX Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Replace timing belt


1993–96 2.3L and 2.6L Engines
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Loosen and remove the engine accessory drive belts.
  3. Remove the cooling fan assembly and the water pump pulley.
  4. Drain the fluid from the power steering reservoir.
  5. Unbolt and remove the power steering pump. Unbolt the hydraulic line brackets from the upper timing cover and move the pump out of the work area without disconnecting the hydraulic lines.
  6. Disconnect and remove the starter motor if a flywheel holder (part No. J–38674) is to be used.
  7. Remove the upper timing belt cover.
  8. Rotate the crankshaft to set the engine at TDC/compression for the No. 1 cylinder. The arrow mark on camshaft sprocket aligns with mark on the rear timing cover.
  9. Remove the crankshaft pulley.
  10. Remove the lower timing belt cover.
  11. Verify that the engine is set at TDC/compression for the No. 1 cylinder. The notch on the crankshaft sprocket aligns with the pointer on the oil seal retainer.
  12. Release and remove the tensioner spring to release the timing belt's tension.
  13. Remove the timing belt.
  14. Unbolt the tensioner pulley bracket from the engine's front cover.
  15. If necessary, unbolt and remove the camshaft sprockets. Use a puller to remove the crankshaft pulley if necessary. Don't loose the crankshaft sprocket key. To install:
  16. Install the camshaft and crankshaft sprockets if they were removed. Align the timing marks and be sure to install any keys. Tighten the camshaft sprocket bolt to 43 ft. lbs. (59 Nm).
  17. Install the tensioner assembly. Tighten the tensioner mounting bolt to 14 ft. lbs. (19 Nm). Tighten the cap bolt to 9 ft. lbs. (13 Nm).
  18. Make sure the crankshaft and the camshaft sprockets are aligned with their timing marks. Install the timing belt onto the sprockets using the following sequence: first, crankshaft sprocket; second, oil pump sprocket; third, camshaft sprocket.
  19. Loosen the tensioner mounting bolt. This will allow the tensioner spring to apply pressure to the timing belt.
  20. After the spring has pulled the timing belt as far as possible, temporarily tighten the tensioner mounting bolt to 14 ft. lbs. (19 Nm). NOTE: Remove the flywheel holder before rotating the crankshaft. Reinstall the holder to torque the crankshaft pulley bolt.
  21. Rotate the crankshaft counterclockwise two complete revolutions to check the rotation of the belt and the alignment of the timing marks. Listen for any rubbing noises which may mean the belt is binding.
  22. Loosen the tensioner pulley bolt to allow the spring to adjust the correct tension. Then, retighten the tensioner pulley bolt to 14 ft. lbs (19 Nm).
  23. Install the lower timing cover and the crankshaft pulley.
  24. Tighten the crankshaft pulley bolt to 87 ft. lbs. (118 Nm). Tighten the small pulley bolts to 6 ft. lbs. (8 Nm).
  25. Install the upper timing cover.
  26. Install the starter if it was removed. Tighten the bolts to 30 ft. lbs. (40 Nm).
  27. Install the power steering pump. If the hydraulic lines were disconnected, refill and bleed the power steering system.
  28. Install the water pump pulley and tighten its nut to 20 ft. lbs. (26 Nm).
  29. Install the cooling fan assembly.
  30. Install and adjust the accessory drive belts.
  31. Connect the negative battery cable.

Jun 26, 2009 | 1995 Isuzu Trooper

1 Answer

Hondai sonota


Which engine? 4 cylinder (2.4 lit) or V6 (2.7 lit)? Two different procedures as well as different belts. The 4 cylinder also has a balance belt. See next image:
42e8a57.jpg
Here's the 2.7 V6 belt:

44efb27.jpg
The replacement procedure is nearly the same at the start (removing, accy drive belts, pullys, support engine & remove front engine mount, remove T.B covers, disconnect Cam Position Sensor & Crank Position Sensor connectors, etc.). When you get to this point on the V6, you also have to remove the front engine mounting bracket from the front of the engine (4 14mm bolts, also a 12mm bolt which bolts the dipstick tube to the side of it) Put crank shaft at TDC (top dead center w/ALL timing marks aligned) remove hydraulic tensioner (2 12 mm bolts), then remove the belt. You'll need to recompress the hydraulic (auto) tensioner in a vise and insert a retaining pin through the pin-holes at the top (through the tensioner piston) to keep it compressed when you reinstall it. Otherwise, you won't be able to install it. Assembly is reverse order of dissassembly. Inspect your pullys while you're in there (check for pully bearing noise, leaking grease, smooth rotation, also the water pump pully, etc.) Replace components as needed. Careful not to damage Crankshaft Position Sensor wire harness.

The 4 Cylinder is quite different. You not only change the timing belt, but also the countershaft (balance) belt, which is behind the crank position sensor blade. IMPORTANT: ALL TIMING MARKS ALIGNED BEFORE REMOVING ANYTHING) There are two (2) counter-shafts (balance shafts). one driven by the timing belt, the other by the crankshaft sprocket behind the timing belt sprocket at the front of the crankshaft.
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Jun 02, 2009 | 2001 Hyundai Sonata

2 Answers

Should hydraulic tensinor be replaced with timing belt - 99 outbk


timing belts do no use a hydraulic tensioner, that is only used on engines with internal oil lubricated timing chains.

Apr 11, 2009 | 1999 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

How to get the timing belt off a 97 Honda Passport?


Ok this is pretty simple first of all this vehicle has a hydraulic tensioner so will nee to loose the two bolts that holds the hyraulic tenisor and remove tensioner completely and belt will become loose and can be removed. Its recommended that you change this tensioner when you do a timing belt job at about 60,00 miles. However if you choose to re-use tension it can be compressed(pushed back in with a bench vise and can be held in place for installion by a very skinny allen key of a wire type brake clip or something of that sort. Here is a diagram of your timing marks, conatct if you need more help Good Luck and thanks for using
FIX YA
http://www.2carpros.com/car_repair_information/tec_info/1997/honda/passport/1997_honda_passport_timing_belt_diagram_marks.htm

Jan 14, 2009 | 1997 Honda Passport

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