Question about 1989 Ford Ranger

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When replacing the battery I inadvertently reversed the positive & negative terminals. The 50A alternator fuse is burned out I suspect because of my mistake. I tried putting a 40A fuse in its place but the engine wouldn't turn over. Question is do all fuses have to be in place or is there other problems pending.

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You need to check all the fuses in both panels.you might have damaged the alt and other componets(computer and other electronic componets) which could get costly

Posted on Oct 07, 2009

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Yeah, all fuses need to be according to mfg specs, you can go the next size bigger (not really reccommended) but never go smaller. You should have several different places for fuses and you probably need to go through them all. My car has 3 different places for fuses (engine and inside car) so check your owners manual for the locations and sizes of all. There really shouldn't be any other pending problems, thats why you have fuses, to protect the electrical components from such a mistake. Good luck.

Posted on Oct 07, 2009

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1 Answer

I can hear the fuel pump running, lights are on, but won't start the car.


First make sure you have good battery connections. A poor connection will give enough power to turn on head lights but not turn on starter motor. Clean the connections and ensure they are tightened.

If connections are good, check voltage of battery. It should be at least 12 volts.

If battery voltage is low, either charge the battery, or attempt to jump start the car (red to positive terminals, black to negative terminals; attached positive first, prefer to attach negative terminal to a good metal location other than the negative terminal on the battery).

If the starter motor is visible, try tapping lightly with a mallet to free it up. This may or may not work depending on the problem. If the car starts, replace the starter motor anyway or it will strand you again.

Most cars have a starter relay and a fuse for the ignition. Do a Google search on the internet for your model of car, or look in your owners manual to find the location of the solenoid and/or fuse. Replace the fuse if it's burned out. Note that a shorted starter motor could cause the fuse to burn out, so replacing the fuse may not fix the problem. Suspect a shorted starter motor or wire if the fuse burns out again. You may need some professional assistance at this point to check the solenoid.

If the solenoid is bad, it is usually replaced along with the starter. Remove starter motor/solenoid and take to an Autozone or Oreilly or equivalent and have them check its functionality. Be sure to disconnect the battery's negative terminal before removing the starter motor.

If the starter is good, then your problem is likely either your car's security system (check if security light is flashing if you have such) or check the ignition switch. If you have a mechanic friend, see if he can bypass the ignition switch and get the starter motor to turn over.

Poor electrical connections or a bad battery or a bad starter motor/solenoid are the most likely culprits.

Mar 31, 2014 | 1996 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

Write the differences between alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC).


I will try, but understand, though we can harness electricity for power, there are still mysteries surrounding the existence and interaction of electric charge.
Alternating current is an electric current that reverses direction at regular intervals. All household current is alternating current. That is how it is generated through power lines, our electric grid, from the source like hydroelectric dams through power lines and into our homes.
Direct current is electric current going only one way in a wire or circuit. Automobiles run on direct current. Science says the flow of electrons in direct current only travels one way. Alternators in cars start out producing alternating current, but with an electric device called a diode, the current is changed to direct current. A diode will only let current pass through it in one direction, but stops current flow in a reverse direction. Before the invention or discovery of alternators, cars used a belt driven generator to produce direct current. Alternators proved superior in generating electricity, however, so were adopted by auto makers.
Now purists will add something more: by convention we say that current flows from the positive battery terminal, through the wire circuits, through an electric motor, and then to ground and thus back to the negative terminal of the battery. So from positive to negative, right? Well, electricity is a negative charged electron flow through a wire, so purists say the current flow is actually from the negative battery terminal through the wire circuits and back to the positive battery terminal. It is confusing, so by convention we say (DC) current flow is from positive to ground, or negative.
Well, there you go. Is it crystal clear, or whut??? Lol.

Nov 08, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Have a delcotron alternator ,what to know where no.1 terminal and no.2terminal wire goes it is on my 1946 cj2a jeep my amp hand does not show a charge had alternator checked out and is ok


  • Use a wrench to remove the negative and positive battery cables: They are clearly labeled "+" and "-." Always remove the negative cable first, as this isolates the power to the metal parts of your car. Tuck the cables away from the battery as you don't want them to accidentally touch a battery terminal when you're wiring your alternator.

  • 3

    Locate the alternator terminals. There are two: one marked "live," "pos" or "+" and the other marked "neg," "field" or "-."

  • 4

    Locate the two cables. The positive (red) cable goes to your battery via a wire loom or harness. The negative (black) cable attaches to a metal part of your car.

  • 5

    Check how the cables attach to the alternator terminals. Some connect using eyelets that hook over the terminal and tighten with a bolt; others connect by inserting the wire under the terminal and tightening a bolt.

  • 6

    Loosen the two bolts using a suitable-sized wrench or, if the cables connect using eyelets, remove the bolts.

  • 7

    Insert the exposed end of the negative (black) cable under the loosened bolt on the negative terminal of the alternator, then tighten the bolt. If the cable has an eyelet, hook it over the terminal and screw the bolt back in place and tighten using a wrench.

  • 8

    Insert the exposed end of the positive (red) cable under the loosened bolt on the positive terminal of the alternator, then tighten the bolt. If the cable has an eyelet, hook it over the terminal and screw the bolt back in place and tighten using a wrench.

  • 9

    Replace the positive battery cable on the positive battery terminal using a wrench. Replace the negative battery cable on the negative battery terminal.

  • May 17, 2011 | Jeep CJ Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    1994 Toyota 4 runner: I changed battery just fine; but can't get the fastener back in place.


    I would make sure the fastener fits your battery and vice versa. Make sure it is not upside down or something like that. Is the replacement battery the same size as the old one? Battery REMOVAL & INSTALLATION NOTE: Refer to Section 1 for details on battery maintenance.
    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable from the terminal, then disconnect the positive cable. Special pliers and pullers are available to remove the clamps. Be careful of the many wires and fittings on and around the positive terminal. NOTE: To avoid sparks, always disconnect the negative cable first and reconnect it last.
    2. Unscrew and remove the battery hold down clamp.
    3. Remove the battery, being careful not to spill any of the acid. NOTE: Spilled acid can be neutralized with a baking soda and water solution. If you somehow get acid into your eyes, flush it out with lots of clean water and get to a doctor as quickly as possible.
    4. Clean the battery posts thoroughly before reinstalling or when installing a new one. A light coating of petroleum jelly or battery terminal spray protectant will help fight corrosion.
    5. Clean the cable clamps using the special tools or a wire brush, both inside and out.
    6. Install the battery, and the hold down clamp. Connect the positive and then the negative cable. Do not hammer them into place. The terminals should be coated with grease to prevent corrosion. CAUTION
      Make absolutely sure that the battery is connected properly before you turn on the ignition switch. Reversed polarity can burn out an alternator in a matter of seconds.
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    Jul 04, 2010 | 1993 Toyota 4Runner

    1 Answer

    Starter, battery, or alter Promblems.


    There seems to be a no charge state in this case. I recommend checking the charging system. use the procedure below to isolate this issue.

    Wear protective eye wear and clothing and remove all jewelry when checking your battery and charging system. Jewelry is a good conductor of electricity and is not recommended. Most batteries wear out every 3 to 5 years and need to be replaced. Always replace your battery with an equal replacement battery to assure proper operation. Automotive batteries have a +positive terminal (red), - negative terminal (black). Electricity is stored in the battery and then supplied to the vehicle when the engine is not running. While the engine is running the vehicles alternator charges the battery for future use. (Note: never disconnect the battery while the engine is running. If the battery cable is disconnected from the battery a spark can be generated which can cause the battery to explode or a major electrical malfunction to occur.)

    To check a battery surface voltage, remove the positive terminal protective cover. Connect the +positive side meter lead (red) to the positive side battery terminal. Connect the - negative (black) side meter lead to the negative battery terminal. With the vehicle not running and the car sitting over night the battery voltage should be between 12.5 and 12.8 volts.(You will need to use a voltmeter for this testing procedure)

    The alternator is rotated by a drive belt driven by the vehicles engine while it is running. Electrical voltage and amperage are generated to recharge the battery and supply voltage to the electrical system of the car. The alternator is held in place with mounting bolts. There is a main electrical wire on the rear of the alternator that supplies voltage to a main voltage junction box. If your alternator is not charging properly, your battery will slowly drain down from operating all the electrical systems in your car and stop the car from running.(most non charge states will be the cause of a loose belt or a low tension rate, due to a mis-adjusted alternator. make sure you have enough tension in the belt for full rotation of the alt pulley)

    Next, you will need to check the alternators output with the Amp meter.

    Testing the amperage output of the alternator is good for measuring the amount (not the level) of voltage the alternator can produce. This test can be tricky because if the alternator is weak it can still show it as producing amperage. Which is good, but if the voltage is low, it will still allow the battery to go dead. To check the amperage output of an alternator an amp meter is needed. Once the meter is connected start the engine. Next turn on all electrical accessories and raise the engine idle to about 1200 RPM. The alternator should output the max amperage it was designed to produce. Example: a 90 amp alternator should output about 88 amps. Note: An alternator cannot sustain maximum output for long periods of time. If the alternator is forced to operate at maximum output it will overheat and fail. An alternator is designed to operate at max amperage output only for a reasonable amount of time.

    ((Connect the voltage meter lead the same way you would in a battery static voltage check, Start engine (do not drive) at engine idle the voltage should be between 13.6 to 14.3 volts. If not the alternator may need replacing.)))


    Additionally, If the above inspections prove that the charging system, and battery are ok, This will lead to a battery drain issue.

    Here is a procedure I use to isolate a battery drain. Remove the negative battery cable from the battery. Using a 12-volt test light, hook one end to the negative battery post the other end to the negative battery cable you just disconnected. The test light will glow or "light" if there is a drain. If the "light or glow" is faint, that is probably normal draw for the clock or computer. If the "light or glow" is bright, this will indicate a large drain is present. That should be corrected,asap. Now start removing and replacing the fuses one by one until the light goes out; The one fuse that causes the light to shut off, will be the circuit with the drain. Remember to close the car doors, when testing. If not, the interior doom light will interfere with the results of the test.

    Dec 15, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Wrangler

    2 Answers

    My car battery was dead when went to start. I jumped it them went to town in other car and came back and would not start again. Lights come on but will not turn over does not sound like it is trying to...


    HI. It is possible that the battery has reached its life span, and may need to be replaced. If this is a new battery, the charging system may be malfunctioning. Use the procedure below to inspect the entire charging assembly for faults.

    Wear protective eye wear and clothing and remove all jewelry when checking your battery and charging system. Jewelry is a good conductor of electricity and is not recommended. Most batteries wear out every 3 to 5 years and need to be replaced. Always replace your battery with an equal replacement battery to assure proper operation. Automotive batteries have a +positive terminal (red), - negative terminal (black). Electricity is stored in the battery and then supplied to the vehicle when the engine is not running. While the engine is running the vehicles alternator charges the battery for future use. (Note: never disconnect the battery while the engine is running. If the battery cable is disconnected from the battery a spark can be generated which can cause the battery to explode or a major electrical malfunction to occur.)

    To check a battery surface voltage, remove the positive terminal protective cover. Connect the +positive side meter lead (red) to the positive side battery terminal. Connect the - negative (black) side meter lead to the negative battery terminal. With the vehicle not running and the car sitting over night the battery voltage should be between 12.5 and 12.8 volts.(You will need to use a voltmeter for this testing procedure)

    The alternator is rotated by a drive belt driven by the vehicles engine while it is running. Electrical voltage and amperage are generated to recharge the battery and supply voltage to the electrical system of the car. The alternator is held in place with mounting bolts. There is a main electrical wire on the rear of the alternator that supplies voltage to a main voltage junction box. If your alternator is not charging properly, your battery will slowly drain down from operating all the electrical systems in your car and stop the car from running.(most non charge states will be the cause of a loose belt or a low tension rate, due to a mis-adjusted alternator. make sure you have enough tension in the belt for full rotation of the alt pulley)

    Next, you will need to check the alternators output with the Amp meter.

    Testing the amperage output of the alternator is good for measuring the amount (not the level) of voltage the alternator can produce. This test can be tricky because if the alternator is weak it can still show it as producing amperage. Which is good, but if the voltage is low, it will still allow the battery to go dead. To check the amperage output of an alternator an amp meter is needed. Once the meter is connected start the engine. Next turn on all electrical accessories and raise the engine idle to about 1200 RPM. The alternator should output the max amperage it was designed to produce. Example: a 90 amp alternator should output about 88 amps. Note: An alternator cannot sustain maximum output for long periods of time. If the alternator is forced to operate at maximum output it will overheat and fail. An alternator is designed to operate at max amperage output only for a reasonable amount of time.

    ((Connect the voltage meter lead the same way you would in a battery static voltage check, Start engine (do not drive) at engine idle the voltage should be between 13.6 to 14.3 volts. If not the alternator may need replacing.)))

    Now, if the charging system is ok, move on to the starter, and ignition switch. Use this procedure to inspect these additional areas.

    Step 1
    Check for 12 volts on the large wire attached to the top terminal on the starter relay. It should have battery voltage. If not, the battery, terminals or wire is bad.


    Step 2
    Check the small wire on the solenoid for power when the key is in the start position. Remove the small wire on the solenoid and have a helper hold the key in the start position. Check the wire for battery voltage. If there is voltage, the starter is bad. If there is no voltage, replace the wire.


    Step 3
    Check the fuse in the fuse box under the hood on the left fender well. If it is good, check the relay by pulling it out and checking for power at one terminal with the key off. If there is no power, the problem is in the fuse box between the fuse and the relay. If there is power, have the helper hold the key in the start position once again and check for power at another terminal from the ignition key. If there is power, the relay is bad. If there is no power, the starter circuit is suspect.


    Step 4
    Check to see if there is power to the neutral safety switch if there is no power at the relay. Use the voltmeter to check for power with the key in start. If there is power going in, check for power going out. If there is no power going in, the security system or ignition switch is suspect. If there is power going in and none coming out, the switch is bad. If there is power coming out, the problem is between the neutral switch and the relay.


    Step 5
    Remove the cover on the bottom of the steering column. Check the solid yellow wire for power when the key is in the start position. If there is no power, the ignition switch is bad.



    Dec 11, 2009 | 2007 Hyundai Elantra Limited Sedan

    2 Answers

    My truck wont start the autnadior works butits as if batterty wont stay chargeed please help


    Is the alternator putting out 13-14 volts when running, if it's below, then it won't be putting out enough to charge your battery, if it's above, then it's overcharging and killing your battery... you should also check the battery and if it's over 5 years old, it's recommended to be replaced...

    Aug 11, 2009 | GMC S-15 Cars & Trucks

    2 Answers

    Wire burning in half when ignition is turned and wont start


    A seriously shorted alternator can do this too.
    Try this:
    - Disconnect the negative terminal of the battery - Replace the fried wire - Remove the lead that runs from either the positive battery terminal or from the starter terminal to the alternator; the idea is to get the alternator out of the circuit temporarily. - Reattach the positive battery terminal (if it had been removed) - Reattach the negative terminal - Try starting the engine
    If the engine will now start and the wire you replaced doesn't fry again, the alternator is badly shorted and will have to be replaced.

    Aug 09, 2009 | 1987 Dodge Dakota

    2 Answers

    I replaced the alternator on my 1991 Toyota pickup and it still is not charging.


    Make sure you have 12 volts going to the ALT. If not you have a popped fuse or open wire.

    Aug 05, 2009 | 1991 Toyota Pickup

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