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Vacuum hose diagram for a 1986 subaru brat

I need a vacuum hose diagram for a 1986 subaru brat 1.8 liter. 4 speed tranny and no air conditioning. i replaced the egr and they got all messed up in the procses

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Hesitation while accelerating


The automatic tranny relies on vacuum pressure from intake manifold to signal when to shift. As the engine RPM increases, there's a proportional increase in intake manifold vacuum pressure. When vacuum pressure reaches a certain point, that signals the tranny to shift up to the next gear. When this vacuum hose has a crack or loose connection, it sends the wrong signal as to when to shift because vacuum pressure is dropping as air enters through the leak source, which the tranny interprets as a need to shift down to a lower gear. Replace all the vacuum hoses and see if this solves the problem. Look at the tranny and identify any air hose connected to it. These are vacuum hoses that you should replace, which usually there's only 1 or two connected to the air intake manifold.

Nov 29, 2013 | Subaru Impreza Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Need to find and replace the DPFE-15 sensor. Dealership diagnosed when service engine light came on and saaid this is what needed replacing. Problem is I do not know where to find it on the engine.


Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) System The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system is designed to:
  • reintroduce exhaust gas into the combustion cycle.
  • lower combustion temperatures.
  • reduce the formation of oxides or nitrogen (NOX).
The amount of exhaust gas reintroduced and the timing of the cycle varies by calibration. Timing and volume are controlled by the following:
  • engine rpm
  • engine vacuum
  • exhaust system back pressure
  • engine coolant temperature
  • air charge temperature
  • throttle position
The EGR valve (EGR valve) (9D475) is vacuum-actuated. The vacuum hose routing diagram is shown on the Vehicle Emission Control Information (VECI) decal. The EGR system is a differential pressure feedback EGR Sensor system. Differential pressure feedback EGR Sensor is a subsonic closed loop EGR system. The differential pressure feedback EGR system:
  • monitors EGR flow rate by the pressure drop across the metering orifice located in the EGR tube.
  • uses a differential pressure feedback EGR sensor as the feedback device.
  • uses the EGR valve only as a pressure regulator, rather than a flow metering device.
  • controlled pressure is varied by the valve movement using vacuum output of the EGR vacuum regulator solenoid (9J459).
  • allows for a more accurate assessment of EGR flow requirements.


Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Flow Diagram


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Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor Removal
  1. Disconnect engine control sensor wiring (12A581) from Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor.
  1. Disconnect Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor hoses from EGR valve to exhaust manifold tube (9D477).
  1. Remove retaining nuts or bolts (depending upon application) and EGR Differential Pressure Feedback transducer.
Installation
  1. Follow removal procedure in reverse order.
  1. Tighten retaining nuts or bolts (depending upon application) to 5-7 Nm (45-61 lb-in).


    Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor, 3.0L (2V) Engine


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    Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor, 3.0L (4V) Engine


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    Item Part Number Description 1 6049 RH Cylinder Head 2 - Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor 3 - Nut (2 Req'd) 4 - Stud Bolt 5 - Bolt (2 Req'd) 6 - Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor Bracket A - Tighten to 5-7 Nm (45-61 Lb-In) B - Tighten to 8-12 Nm (71-106 Lb-In)

    Engine Emission Control Component Location-3.4L SHO Engine


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    Item Part Number Description 1 95607-05200 Nut 2 - EGR Sensor Hose 3 - EGR Sensor Hose 4 95027-08016 Bolt 5 - Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor 6 9J433 Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor Mounting Bracket 7 9D474 EGR Solenoid Vacuum Valve (2 Req'd) 8 A4670 Vacuum Tube Assembly 9 9424 Intake Manifold 10 9J459 EGR Vacuum Regulator Solenoid A - Tighten to 5-7 Nm (45-61 Lb-In)
Hope this helps

Aug 14, 2011 | 1999 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Hi, what engine oil should i use in a 1986 subaru brat?


10w40 is a good oil to use in this 1986 brat.

Jun 25, 2011 | 1984 Subaru Brat

1 Answer

I need to find location of egr solenoid in 1986 subaru wagon


find the EGR valve, then follow the vacuum hose to the solenoid.

Dec 12, 2010 | 1986 Subaru Brat

1 Answer

Have good fire on 1-3 cyl. very little fire on 2-4 cyl


sounds liuke the valves are burnt out ,1986 ?? probaly had its day and it would be cheaper to buy another car than repair this one

Oct 12, 2010 | 1986 Subaru Brat

3 Answers

EGR flow in our 2000 Ford Expedition is insufficient. What does this mean?


Exhaust gas recirculation flow reduced. Could be caused by valve or gunk in the flow path. I'll paste a little bit about troubleshooting below. If you need specific instructions for repairing your system, please reply with your engine size/type.

The Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system is designed to reintroduce exhaust gas into the combustion chambers, thereby lowering combustion temperatures and reducing the formation of Oxides of Nitrogen (NO x ).
The amount of exhaust gas that is reintroduced into the combustion cycle is determined by several factors, such as: engine speed, engine vacuum, exhaust system backpressure, coolant temperature, throttle position. All EGR valves are vacuum operated. The EGR vacuum diagram for your particular vehicle is displayed on the Vehicle Emission Control Information (VECI) label.
The EGR system is Differential Pressure Feedback EGR (DPFE) system, controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) and composed of the following components: DPFE sensor (also referred to as the backpressure transducer), EGR Vacuum Regulator (EVR) solenoid, EGR valve, and assorted hoses.


COMPONENT TESTING

DPFE Sensor

  1. Disconnect the pressure hoses at the DPFE sensor.
  2. Connect a hand vacuum pump to the downstream pickup marked REF on the sensor.
  3. Using a multimeter, backprobe the SIG RTN circuit at the DPFE connector.
  4. With the ignition ON , signal voltage should be 0.20-0.70 volts.
  5. Apply 8-9 in. Hg of vacuum to the sensor. Voltage should be greater than 4 volts.
  6. Quickly release the vacuum from the sensor. Voltage should drop to less than 1 volt in 3 seconds.
  7. If the sensor does not respond as specified, check the power and ground circuits.
  8. If power and ground circuits are functional, the sensor is faulty.

EGR Valve Control Solenoid
  1. Remove the EVR solenoid.
  2. Attempt to lightly blow air into the EVR solenoid.
    1. If air blows through the solenoid, replace the solenoid with a new one.
    2. If air does not pass freely through the solenoid, continue with the test.

  3. Apply battery voltage (approximately 12 volts) and a ground to the EVR solenoid electrical terminals. Attempt to lightly blow air, once again, through the solenoid.
    1. If air does not pass through the solenoid, replace the solenoid with a new one.
    2. If air does not flow through the solenoid, the solenoid is OK.

  4. If the solenoid is functional but the problem still exists, check the power and ground circuits.

EGR Valve
  1. Install a tachometer on the engine, following the manufacturer's instructions.
  2. Detach the engine wiring harness connector from the Idle Air Control (IAC) solenoid.
  3. Disconnect and plug the vacuum supply hose from the EGR valve.
  4. Start the engine, then apply the parking brake, block the rear wheels and position the transmission in Neutral.
  5. Observe and note the idle speed.

If the engine will not idle with the IAC solenoid disconnected, provide an air bypass to the engine by slightly opening the throttle plate or by creating an intake vacuum leak. Do not allow the idle speed to exceed typical idle rpm.
  1. Using a hand-held vacuum pump, slowly apply 5-10 in. Hg (17-34 kPa) of vacuum to the EGR valve nipple.
    1. If the idle speed drops more than 100 rpm with the vacuum applied and returns to normal after the vacuum is removed, the EGR valve is OK.
    2. If the idle speed does not drop more than 100 rpm with the vacuum applied and return to normal after the vacuum is removed, inspect the EGR valve for a blockage; clean it if a blockage is found. Replace the EGR valve if no blockage is found, or if cleaning the valve does not remedy the malfunction.

Sep 27, 2010 | 2000 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

1995 mercury villager check engine code p1200 injector open


P0400 = EGR Flow
P0325 = knock sensor (Do not ever change a knock sensor, they don't affect anything and cost $600 to replace for absolutely no gain)
P1200 = I can't find this one. I think it's injector flow
report back on what you find.
Egr flow may be plugged egr passages or a bad solenoid.
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1996 PCED OBDII-Villager SECTION 1B: Description and Operation
Exhaust Gas Recirculation System
Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) System Operation The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system (Figure 1 below) recirculates a portion of the exhaust gases into the intake manifold under average vehicle driving conditions to reduce combustion temperatures and exhaust gas NOx content. The amount of exhaust gas recirculated varies according to operating conditions and will be cut completely under:
  • Engine starting condition
  • Low engine coolant temperature condition
  • Excessively high engine coolant temperature condition
  • Engine idling condition
  • High engine speed condition
  • Mass air flow sensor failure
The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system on the Villager uses the exhaust gas recirculation/evaporative emission (EGR/EVAP) control solenoid valve to provide vacuum to both the EGR valve and the EVAP canister when commanded by the PCM. If the exhaust backpressure is sufficient to close the EGR backpressure transducer valve, vacuum is sent to the EGR valve and allows EGR gas to flow into the intake manifold. If the exhaust backpressure is not sufficient, the EGR backpressure transducer will remain open and allow vacuum from the EGR/EVAP control solenoid to vent to the atmosphere.
The EGR system monitor, for OBD II regulations, uses an EGR temperature sensor to monitor the EGR system. The EGR temperature sensor is a thermister located in the EGR passageway. When hot exhaust gas is recirculated into the engine, the temperature at the EGR passageway increases. This increase is sensed by the EGR temperature sensor and a signal is sent to the PCM to indicate EGR flow. If the EGR temperature sensor does not detect EGR flow when commanded by the PCM after two consecutive drive cycles, the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) will be illuminated and a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) will be stored. The MIL will be turned off after three consecutive drive cycles are completed with no malfunctions detected. The DTC will remain stored in the PCM memory until 80 drive cycles have been completed without the same malfunction detected in the system.
Figure 1: Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) System Diagram Item Number Description 1 — EGR/EVAP Control Solenoid 2 — Air Cleaner Housing 3 — Throttle Valve 4 — EGR Temperature Sensor 5 — EGR Valve 6 — EGR Backpressure Transducer 7 — EVAP Canister
Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Backpressure Transducer Valve The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) backpressure transducer valve is used to control EGR. The EGR valve is operated by ported vacuum, but the ported vacuum will normally be vented off at the EGR backpressure transducer valve. As rpm increases, exhaust pressure increases and pushes on the diaphragm in the EGR backpressure transducer valve and closes the vacuum vent.
Figure 2: EGR Backpressure Transducer Value
Item Number Description 1 — Throttle Valve 2 — Vacuum Port 3 9D475 EGR Valve 4 9F452 EGR Backpressure Transducer Valve 5 — EVAP Canister 6 — EGR/EVAP Control Solenoid 7 — Vent
EGR/EVAP Control Solenoid The exhaust gas recirculation/evaporative emission (EGR/EVAP) control solenoid (Figure 3) is controlled by the powertrain control module (PCM). The EGR/EVAP control solenoid controls vacuum to both the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve and to the evaporative (EVAP) emission canister. When the EGR/EVAP control solenoid is off (12 V signal from the PCM) vacuum is supplied to both the EGR valve and to the EVAP canister. When the EGR/EVAP control solenoid is on (ground supplied by PCM) vacuum is vented to the atmosphere keeping the EGR valve closed and no vacuum to the EVAP canister. The PCM will command the EGR/EVAP control solenoid on at:
  • Engine starting condition
  • Low engine coolant temperature condition
  • Excessively high engine coolant temperature condition
  • Engine idling condition
  • High engine speed condition
  • Mass air flow sensor failure
Figure 3: Exhaust Gas Recirculation/Evaporative Emission (EGR/EVAP) Control Solenoid
Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Temperature Sensor
The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) temperature sensor (Figure 4) is a thermister type sensor that monitors the temperature of the exhaust in the EGR passageway. As the EGR flow increases, the temperature increases. This process creates a change in the resistance of the sensor, which decreases as the temperature increases. The signal is sent to the powertrain control module (PCM) to indicate that the EGR system is working properly. If the EGR temperature sensor does not change resistance as the PCM expects on two consecutive drives, the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) will be illuminated and a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) will be stored.
Figure 4: EGR Temperature Sensor Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Valve
The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve (Figure 5) recirculates portions of the exhaust gas back into the intake manifold to reduce the amount of the NOx released during combustion and to reduce combustion temperature. The amount of exhaust gases that are released into the engine is proportional to the load on the engine.
Figure 5: EGR Valve

Mar 20, 2009 | 1995 Mercury Villager

2 Answers

Installation of Subaru EA8 alternator


why would you need a diagram all there is a plug and a wire or two that has a washer look. that goes on the stud at the back of the alternator that uses either a 6 8 or 10 mm nut to tighten the wires up.thats it i hope this helps thanks jeff

Oct 20, 2008 | 1984 Subaru Brat

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