Question about 1996 Honda Civic

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Rpm drop when open a/c

Rpm drop when open air cond and steering jerking. been changed the ignition cable, spark plug, engine mounting and engine tuning

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First of all, a drop in power when AC turned on, is not uncommon due to the fact that it puts quite a noticeable load on a 4 cyl engine, but in saying that your IAC (idle air control motor) should be compensating for the extra load and adjusting idle to normal when this occurs. Try pulling the IAC off & clean it & port it comes out of real good with throttle body spray cleaner, and re-installl it and see if that helps. As far as steering jerking, take a close look at belt condition as well as tension on belt, as it may need adjustment or belt and/or tensioner replaced.

Posted on Oct 03, 2009

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My car engine stop running suddenly without any warning in neutral gear position, although I've check using OBD 2 reader there's no error detected. What usually causing this problem?


Hi

have you considered the ignition module that the coil pack sits on because that will cause your motor to randomly stop with out warning.

25718641-extj4arg1t42xbh3l3byl5v2-3-0.jpg
also the crank and cam angle sensor smay need to be considered depending on the vehicle

25718641-extj4arg1t42xbh3l3byl5v2-3-1.jpg


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Enging code came up on my 2004 dodge ram 1500 5.7 Hemi. Said ignition coil E was bad and that I had a misfire in cylinder 3. Replaced coil at cylinder 3 but it's still running rough. Is coil E somewhere...


Have you checked the spark plug itself? --- 5.7L Engine To Remove:
NOTE: Note spark plug cable original positions before removing.
dod_ram15_57_ign_coil.gif

dod_ram15_57_ign_coil_loc.gif

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Clean the area around the coil with compressed air.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Battery negative cable
    • Throttle body air intake tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Coil electrical connector by moving slide lock and pressing on release lock
    • Secondary high-voltage cable from coil
    • Mounting bolts
    • Coil from cylinder head opening by twisting
To Install:
  1. Clean area around spark plugs with compressed air.
  2. Apply dielectric grease to inside of boots.
  3. Install or connect the following:
    • Ignition coil to cylinder head opening
    • 2 mounting bolts
      1. Torque to: 106 inch lbs. (12 Nm)
    • Coil electrical connector
    • Cable to coil
    • Throttle body air tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Battery negative cable
---
Distributorless Ignition System General Information This vehicle uses two different types of ignition systems. The 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines do not use a conventional distributor. The 5.9L engine uses a conventional distributor. The ignition system is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) on all engines. Procedures in this section are for the 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines; please see the section on Distributor Ignition Systems for procedures for the 5.9L engine.
Distributorless ignition systems (EI) are used on many current engines. This system uses the waste spark method for distributing secondary voltage. In a waste spark system, an individual coil is used to fire one pair of engine cylinders simultaneously. These cylinders are known as companions, since each of their pistons is at TDC at the same time. On a typical V6 engine for example, cylinder 1 is at TDC compression while cylinder 4 is at TDC exhaust. This is also true of cylinders 2 and 5 as well as cylinder 3 and 6.
The cylinder on the compression stroke is known as the event cylinder, while the cylinder on the exhaust stroke is called the waste cylinder. Since secondary resistance is very low in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke, little voltage is required to fire the plug. For this reason, the majority of available voltage is consumed by the cylinder on the compression stroke.
One spark plug is attached to each end of the secondary coil winding via the spark plug wires. This series circuit arrangement causes one of the plugs to fire in a forward direction (center electrode to outer electrode), and the other spark plug to fire in a reverse direction (outer electrode to center electrode). The firing voltage requirements on the waste spark ignition are significantly greater than a traditional ignition system primarily because it takes 30% more energy to fire a plug reverse polarity. When a spark plug is fired backwards, it fires from the outer electrode to the center electrode. This is a high resistance path since the electrons do not flow as easily from a cold, dull surface such as the outer electrode to a hot, sharp surface like the center electrode.
Since the coil and plugs are arranged in a series circuit, a typical plug gap of .050" results in a total gap of .100" for the whole circuit that includes two spark plugs for the companion cylinders. The waste spark can overcome this added resistance by producing high secondary output voltages due to low resistance in the primary winding. Another reason higher secondary ignition voltage is required is cylinder pressure; specifically, the lack of it. Generally, event cylinders require 10 to 12-kV to initiate current flow across the spark plug gap, while only 2 - 3-kV is needed to fire the waste cylinder. Therefore, the air gap in the waste cylinder creates no more resistance than the rotor gap does in a conventional ignition system.
There are two different methods used for coil trigger. One method sends the crankshaft sensor signal directly to the ignition module to activate the coils, while the other sends the crankshaft sensor signal to the PCM and the PCM controls ignition operation either directly or through a separate ignition module.
Waste spark ignition advantages
  • It has fewer components than conventional distributor-type ignition systems.
  • No mechanical adjustments to set ignition timing.
  • No mechanical load (turning the distributor shaft).
  • No unwanted timing variations caused by gear lash or other worn distributor components.
Another advantage of waste spark is longer coil life. To illustrate this point, consider a six-cylinder engine with conventional ignition. At 3000 RPM, the coil must fire 9000 times per minute. This is calculated by dividing the engine speed by 2, since the cam turns at half crank speed, and then multiplying the distributor RPM by the total number of engine cylinders.
In contrast, the coils on a six-cylinder engine with waste spark only work a third as hard. This is because there's a coil for every two cylinders and each coil fires every crankshaft revolution. This means that at 3000 RPM, the coils only fire 3000 times per minute. This allows each coil to operate with less dwell (time that the coil is energized), resulting in less heat buildup and longer life.
Coil Over Plug System The coil over plug system was developed so that spark and spark timing could be better controlled on an individual cylinder basis. Each cylinder has an ignition coil mounted directly above the spark plug on the cylinder head cover. A short suppresser/connector replaces the spark plug wire and links the coil to the plug. There are different methods used for primary triggering. Some manufacturers use a combination coil/module, which means each coil has its own control circuit that is activated by the PCM. Others use remote mounted modules to trigger the coils.
Each individual coil is allowed to saturate while all other cylinders fire. For a V-8 engine, this allows a period of seven firing events for coil saturation, compared to three events for the same V-8 engine with a waste spark system. The coil over plug system also benefits from a minimum amount of energy lost, due to the resistance of spark plug wires.
Coil Near Plug System The coil near plug system also features multiple ignition coils. An ignition coil/module is mounted in proximity of each cylinder. There is a short length of spark plug wire between the coil and the spark plug.
Each ignition coil/module has its own control circuit and is activated sequentially by the PCM. All timing decisions are made by the PCM. This includes both ignition timing and duration of the spark.

Nov 03, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

1 Answer

Where would the pvc value be on a 300 chrysler 2006? also where would the spark plugs be located?


Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PVC) Valve Removal & Installation 5.7L Engine To Remove:
    1.The PCV valve is mounted into the top/right side of the intake manifold.

    2.The PCV valve is sealed to the intake manifold with two O-rings.

    3.Free the PCV valve by rotating counter-clockwise 90 degrees until the locating tabs align with the openings on the manifold.

    4.Remove the PCV valve by pulling straight up from intake manifold and clearing the tabs.

    5.Check the condition of two valve O-rings.
To Install:
  1. Clean the PCV valve opening on the intake manifold.
  2. Inspect the PCV valve O-rings. Replace if suspect.
  3. Apply engine oil to the two O-rings.
  4. Place the PCV valve into intake manifold.
  5. Rotate the valve 90 degrees clockwise for installation.
6.1L Engine To Remove:
  1. The PCV valve is threaded into the right-front corner of the intake manifold.
  2. Remove the rubber hose from the PCV valve.
  3. Unscrew the PCV valve from the intake manifold.
To Install:
  1. Clean the PCV valve opening on the intake manifold.
  2. Check the condition of the PCV valve O-ring. Replace if suspect.
  3. Check the condition of the PCV valve threads and clean if necessary.
  4. Apply engine oil to the O-ring.
  5. Install the PCV valve into intake manifold.
  6. Install the rubber hose to the PCV valve.
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The spark plugs should lead to the coil pack via a spark plug wire but may be hidden by a plastic cover.

The following details the ignition coil changing on the Chrysler 300:

2.7L Engine To Remove:
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the intake manifold.
  3. Use compressed air to clear the area around the ignition coil and spark plug.
  4. Disconnect the electrical connector from the ignition coil.
  5. Remove the two fasteners securing the ignition coil.
  6. Remove the ignition coil.
To Install:
  1. Install the ignition coil.
  2. Tighten the fasteners to 55 in-lb (6.2 Nm).
  3. Connect the electrical connector to the ignition coil.
  4. Install the intake manifold.
  5. Connect the negative battery cable.
3.5L Engine To Remove:
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the intake manifold.
  3. Use compressed air to clear the area around the ignition coil and spark plug.
  4. Disconnect the electrical connector from the ignition coil. NOTE: Loosen the ignition coil fasteners by alternating back and forth. Do not lose the spacers under the coil when loosening the fasteners.
  5. Remove the two fasteners securing the ignition coil.
  6. Remove the ignition coil.
To Install:
NOTE: Tighten the ignition coil fasteners by alternating back and forth. Do not lose the spacers under the coil when installing the coil.
  1. Install the ignition coil.
  2. Tighten the fasteners to 60 in-lb (6.7 Nm).
  3. Connect the electrical connector to the ignition coil.
  4. Install the intake manifold.
  5. Connect the negative battery cable.
5.7L Engine (2005) To Remove:
NOTE: Carefully note the position of each spark plug cable before disconnecting them so they can be installed in their original positions to prevent misfire.
NOTE: The throttle body intake air duct or intake air box may need to be removed to gain access to certain ignition coils.
  1. Disconnect the electrical connector from the ignition coil.
  2. Remove the secondary ignition cable from the coil.
  3. Use compressed air to clear the area around the ignition coil.
  4. Remove the two fasteners securing the ignition coil. Bolts are retained to coil.
  5. Remove the ignition coil. Pull with a slight twisting motion to help release the boot seal with the spark plugs.
To Install:
NOTE: Apply a light film of dielectric grease to the inside of the coil boots before installation.
  1. Clean area around spark plug and coil mounting area with compressed air.
  2. Install the ignition coil.
  3. Tighten the fasteners to 105 in-lb (12 Nm).
  4. Connect the electrical connector to the ignition coil.
  5. Connect the secondary ignition cable to the coil.
  6. Install the air duct or air box if removed.
Ignition coil mounting bolts (5.7L & 6.1L engines) chry-02-57-263.gif

5.7L (2006) & 6.1L Engine To Remove:
NOTE: Each ignition coil, mounted on the valve cover, fires two spark plugs at each cylinder.
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Use compressed air to clear the area around the ignition coil and spark plug.
  3. Disconnect the electrical connector from the ignition coil.
  4. Remove the two fasteners securing the ignition coil.
  5. Remove the ignition coil. Pull with a slight twisting motion to help release the boot seal with the spark plugs.
To Install:
NOTE: Apply a light film of dielectric grease to the inside of the coil boots before installation.
  1. Install the ignition coil.
  2. Tighten the fasteners to 105 in-lb (12 Nm).
  3. Connect the electrical connector to the ignition coil.
  4. Connect the negative battery cable.
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Sep 24, 2010 | 2005 Chrysler 300

2 Answers

Idle fluxuates up and down consistantly


Check the Idle Control System

Idle speed is controlled by the Idle Air Control Valve (IACV). The IACV changes the amount of air being bypassed to the intake manifold, in response to electric current controlled by the ECM. When the IACV is activated, the valve opens to maintain proper idle speed.

Symptom and Subsystems to Check:

1. Difficult to start engine, when cold--check Fast Idle Thermo Valve.

2. Fast idle out of spec, when cold:
a. Check Fast Idle Thermo Valve.
b. Check IACV.
c. Check idle adjusting screw (see Section C).

3. Rough idle:
a. Check hoses and connections.
b. Check IACV.

4. RPM too high, when warm:
a. Check IACV.
b. Check Fast Idle Thermo Valve.
c. Check hoses and connections, check Power Steering Pressure Switch Signal, and check idle adjusting screw.

5. RPM too low, when warm:
a. Idle speed is below specified rpm, with no load--check IACV and idle adjusting screw.
b. Idle speed doesn't increase after initial start up--check IACV.
c. Idle speed drops in gear (automatic transmission)--check automatic transaxle gear position switch signal.
d. Idle speed drops when AC is on--check air conditioning signal and IACV.
e. Idle speed drops when steering wheel is turned--check power steering pressure switch signal and IACV.
f. Idle speed fluctuates with electrical load--check hoses and connections, IACV, and Alternator FR Signal.

6. Frequent stalling, while warming up--check IACV and idle adjusting screw.

7. Frequent stalling, after warming up--check idle adjusting screw and IACV.

Additional Steps:

. Check Alternator FR Signal. Have alternator inspected, if idle speed fluctuates with electrical load. The FR signal communicates to the ECM how "hard" the alternator is working to meet the electrical demands of the car, including the battery and any loads which aren't monitored by the ELD. This square-wave signal varies in pulse width, according to the load on the alternator. The ECM places, approximately, 5 reference volts on the wire. The voltage regulator will drop this signal to approximately 1.2 volts, in proportion to alternator load. The ECM compares the electrical load (ELD) signal with the FR (Charging Rate) signal from the alternator and uses that information to set the idle speed and turn the alternator on and off. This helps fuel economy.

. Clean main ECM ground on thermostat housing.

. Reset ECM, by removing the 7.5 amp Back Up Fuse, in the under-hood fuse box, for 10 seconds.

. Replace PCV Valve, cleaning hose with brake cleaner spray.

. Substitute a known-good ECM. If symptom goes away, replace original ECM.

Check the ICM (Erratic RPM and PGM-FI System)

When the engine is cold, the air conditioner compressor is on, the transmission is in gear (automatic transmission only) or the alternator is charging, the ECM controls current to the Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve to maintain correct idle speed. Here's an overview of how the PGM-FI System works.

Background:

Various inputs to the ECM are TDC/CKP/CYP Sensor, MAP Sensor, ECT Sensor, IAT Sensor, TP Sensor, HO2S, VSS, BARO Sensor, EGR Valve Lift Sensor, Starter Signal, Alternator FR Signal, Air Conditioning Signal, Automatic Transmission Shift Position Signal, Battery Voltage (Ignition 1) Brake Switch Signal, PSP Switch Signal, ELD, and VTEC Pressure Switch.

Inputs are received and processed by the ECM's Fuel Injector Timing and Duration, Electronic Idle Control, Other Control Functions, Ignition Timing Control, and ECM Back-up Functions. These are the primary functional areas within the ECM.

Outputs from the ECM control Fuel Injectors, PGM-FI Main Relay (Fuel Pump), MIL (Check Engine Light), Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve, A/C Compressor Clutch Relay, Ignition Control Module (ICM), EVAP Purge Control Solenoid Valve, HO2S Heater, EGR Control Solenoid Valve, Alternator, Lock-up Solenoid Valve A/B (A/T), VTEC Solenoid Valve, and Interlock Control Unit.

Idle RPM:

Once you understand how the PGM-FI system is configured, it's easy to see how the ECM, Idle Air Control Valve, and the Ignition Control Module affect idle rpm. If the ECM's Electronic Idle Control function is not working properly, then it cannot properly control the IAC Valve. Likewise, if the ECM's Ignition Timing Control function is not operating properly, it cannot properly control the ICM (igniter). Obviously, idle rpm will also be affected if there's a problem with the IAC Valve or the ICM. As stated above, the ECM controls current to the Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve to maintain correct idle speed. This cannot happen if the IAC Valve is failing. The same situation exists if the ICM is failing. The ECM will tell the ICM to open and close the primary voltage circuit going to the coil and it won't respond properly. The result will be erratic spark plug firing and erratic rpm.

Conclusion:

If you are experiencing erratic idle rpm, try and isolate whether the problem is caused by the ICM (ignitor), IAC Valve, or the ECM. My experience has been that a failing ICM is usually responsible for the problem. Keep in mind that tachometers are connected directly to the ICM. Therefore, a fluctuating tachometer needle is often a dead giveaway. Heat and poor preventive maintenance (causing high secondary voltage to be discharge on internal distributor components) frequently causes the ICM (and coil) to fail. Besides performance, this is another reason why it's important to regularly replace spark plugs, spark plug wires, rotors, and distributor caps. Electricity will always follow the path of least resistance, even if it isn't the intended one. Our job is to ensure the intended path is the path of least resistance.

Ignitor (ICM) and Coil Replacement:

1. Disconnect negative battery cable.
2. Remove hex head machine screws, securing distributor cap to housing, using an 8 mm nut driver.
3. Move distributor cap and wires off to the side.
4. Remove machine screw securing rotor to shaft, using a #2 Phillips head screwdriver. It may be necessary to "hit" the starter once or twice, in order to rotate rotor for access to mounting screw.
5. Remove rotor and leak cover.
6. Unfasten ignitor wires, remove coil mounting screws, and set coil aside. Note: Removing coil first improves access to igniter.
7. Unfasten screws securing igniter to housing.
8. Remove ignitor from distributor and unfasten screws mounting ignitor to heat sink.
9. Coat back of new ignitor (or old igniter, if reusing) and male connectors with silicone grease. Silicone grease increases heat transfer to heat sink. Failure to apply silicone grease will cause the ignitor to quickly fail.
10. Mount ignitor to heat sink and reinstall ignitor, igniter terminal wires, coil, coil wires, leak cover, rotor, and distributor cap. Ensure female ignitor terminals fit snugly--crimp with pliers, if necessary.

AutoZone can test ICMs and coils for free. If you plan to keep the car, I would replace the ICM due the age of your Civic.

Sep 15, 2010 | 1991 Honda Civic

1 Answer

How to change spark plugs on a 4cyl 2005 kia sportage


Inspection
Inspect the spark plug tip for wear and damage. If the tip is covered with carbon, replace the plug. Do not drop or shock the spark plug. If the ceramic body is broken replace the plug.


7ce3b2b.jpg
Fig. Spark plug inspection points


Removal & Installation
WARNING Do not attempt to remove spark plugs when the engine is hot.
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the air intake hose assembly.
  3. Remove the accelerator cable bracket.
  4. Remove the six bolts and coil cover from cylinder head cover.
  5. Remove the four bolts and the two coils from the cover.
  6. Disconnect the high tension leads from the spark plugs by twisting the boot and removing.
  7. Use compressed air to remove any dirt from around the spark plug hole.
  8. Make sure the spark plug socket fits squarely on the spark plug, and then remove.
To install:
  1. Be sure the spark plug gap is set to 0.039-0.043 in. (0.98-1.09mm).
  2. Apply anti-seize compound to the spark plug threads.
  3. Carefully install the spark plug into the cylinder head and torque to 11-17 ft. lbs. (23 Nm).
  4. Reconnect high tension leads.
  5. Install the two ignition coils and torque four mounting bolts to 14-19 ft. lbs. (26 Nm).
  6. Install the coil cover and secure with six bolts
  7. Install the accelerator cable bracket.
  8. Reconnect the air intake hose assembly.
  9. Reconnect the negative battery cable.

Have a nice day. Good luck (remember rated this help)

Mar 05, 2010 | 2001 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

My car is jerking while accelerating and reaching certain RPM


I would look for a fault in the ignition system such as a cracked spark plug. Might need a scope check to put your finger on the problem

Apr 06, 2009 | 2002 Buick Century

3 Answers

Hyundai Sonata jerks/loss of power


Has your car ever had a tune up those little 4 cylinder cars will do that even if 1 cylinder isn't firing properly, so in conclusion what you can do is make sure all your spark plug wires are pushed on all the way since the motor mount is broke they might be coming loose but what i would do is change the spark plugs and wires and fuel filter.. just give it a little tune up if your at all handy you can do it yourself and the parts are cheap you might have 60 bucks into it... if you need anymore help or need me to help you with doing the work just let me know and ill answer all of your questions... Please give me a rating if this helped you
thanks Steve

Dec 28, 2008 | 2000 Hyundai Sonata

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