Question about 1999 Isuzu Rodeo

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Isuzu 4jb1 turbo Timing belt replacement proceedure, where does the crankshaft keyway sit.the cam pully.and the fuel pully..thanks in advance

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 3 Answers

SOURCE: 1994 isuzu holden rodeo injection timing adjustment

try u-pull our patrs

Posted on Sep 12, 2008

  • 36 Answers

SOURCE: 1997 Honda Passport 4wd auto timing belt

if it help let me know

Posted on Sep 14, 2008

  • 28 Answers

SOURCE: 4jb1 engine

I can tell about a couple of odors from oils that are quite indicative of the places where they oil is leaking into the exhaust though.

You've got a few internal places where oil can get into the engine and even some can get into the combustion chambers. They have distinctive odors and can really help diagnose the cause or reason for the oil consumption.

First let's start with the "sweet-smells".

This means that the oil have gone through the combustion process along with the engine's fuel (gasoline or diesels too!). It is about the same smell you get whiffing the exhaust on a 2-cycle engine with gas-oil premix.

Places where this CAN happen:

1) Cylinder walls ie; piston rings, worn or broken.
2) PCV system where the oil is sucked into the manifold under vacuum and is entrained into the combustion chamber in the normal air-flow to the engine for combustion.
3) Intake runner-to-head surface gasket(s) where the intake can actually **** oil from the cam tray area or the inner valley between the heads and the intake manifold.
4) Occasionally from changing spark plugs in "well" type plug chambers that let the plug get very close to the head through the head casting. Taking a plug out and letting the collected oil fall into the cylinder is usually a temporary situation, but can scare you when it happens.
5) Cracked head or blown head gasket: this usually has to happen where the head has a high pressure passageway for the oil to travel through the head to get to a cam tower on top of the head.
6) Now - here's something that's gonna get debated, fer sure! ONLY the intake valves can leak past their stem seals and allow oil to travel down the stem onto the combustion process. Remember that I am speaking or "sweet" oil smell here.


Now some of the "not sweet" or bitter oil smell:

1) Exhaust guides or stem seals on the EXHAUST valves ONLY can cause a very acrid smell of nasty, eye watering and cough-inducing stink.
2) CVCC or pre-combustion chambers can also cause this problem. The Honda CVCC engines were notorious for this! The auxiliary valve can leak oil into the pre-chamber and then it opens the valve and dumps the burning mess into the main cylinder head area and the results are a bad BAD stink and lots of white/blue smoke.
3) RARELY...very rarely the exhaust port AFTER the exhaust valve seat can become perforated and allow oil to get into the exhaust stream. It does NOT burn here - rather it just cooks-off with a very bad smell.

So-o-o-o

Acrid oil smell
- the oil has NOT gone through the combustion process in the cylinder head but is rather "cooked" into a stinky odor. It may or may not smoke too much too.

Sweet oil-burning smell - oil that has been burned as part of the combustion process in the combustion chamber on one or more or even all cylinders.

Posted on Mar 20, 2009

stevenhurc
  • 450 Answers

SOURCE: 1999 isuzu trooper 3.5 broken timing belt while driving on freeway

these free wheel when belt breaks they dont bend valves
but you need to remove both rocker covers to align cam gear mark and have cam lobes in these positions
cb47a33.jpg

Posted on Jul 28, 2009

  • 31 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 isuzu rodeo v6 3.2

Go to parts store get manual that will tell you a lot better then it can be explained

Posted on Nov 02, 2009

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1 Answer

Need diagram for timing marks gear driven for isuzu 2000 4jb1


no year, no car stated.
cam or fuel pump timing, HARK?
so we must look that up and find answers lacking the first 2 questions?
and we are uSA forum and have no such engine.
so you be timing the cam... ever google that.
but, but.... wait... i can google stuff....

wiki shows:
the 4JB1 is a 2.8 L (2,771 cc) 93 mm bore, 102 mm stroke direct injection diesel engine. It was used in the Isuzu Bighorn (Trooper), Mu (Rodeo), Wizard (LWB Rodeo), Rodeo Pickup and Holden Jackaroo sold in most world markets aside from North America until the early 1990s. Stock power was 87 PS (64 kW) in the 1989 Isuzu Trooper.[7] Industrial versions of this motor were also sold in Isuzu light trucks.

OMG. 800 hits at:

4JB1 site:http://forum.planetisuzoo.com/

its there and the book pages, pdf
1st link.... amazing huh?

Sep 09, 2015 | Isuzu Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How does the metal plate on crank attach to the crankshaft sensor?


They are called a reluctor wheel and some are heated and pressed on, others are bolted on or held in place with dowel pins and then some fit on keyways. They attach to the crankshaft and rotate were as the sensor is attached to the housing and is stationary.

Jun 25, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Replacing the waterpump on a 1992 Isuzu pickup with carbureted, timing BELT 2.3 litre four cylinder engine. Do i need to remove the crankshaft-pulley center bolt to be able to pull the timing belt cover...


pretty safe on this old engine ,put socket and bar on the bottom pulley bolt and crank engine so starter motor cracks the bolt for you ,these older engines have a keyway on the pulley so no problem do not do this on new cars as pulley has no keyway and once the pressure is released the cambelt doesnt move and the valves go clonk

May 02, 2011 | 1992 Isuzu Pickup

2 Answers

Timing belt


TIMING BELT & SPROCKETS R & I
NOTE: Some procedures may differ slightly due to engine
construction.
Removal
1) Remove all necessary air ducts. Position No. 4 piston at
TDC of compression stroke. Align timing marks. See Fig. 2. Remove fan
and fan shroud. Remove belts. If necessary, remove radiator and
splashguard.
2) Prevent engine from rotating and remove crankshaft timing
pulley retaining bolt. Remove upper and lower timing belt covers.
Remove spring from tension pulley. Loosen adjusting bolt and move
pulley toward water pump. Remove timing belt.
CAUTION: Ensure pistons are at TDC when rotating camshaft or damage
may result.
Inspection
1) Handle timing belt carefully. Avoid twisting or kinking
belt. Do not allow belt to become contaminated by water, oil, dirt or
other contaminates. Inspect belt for cracks or damage. If necessary,
replace.
2) Measure tension pulley spring length and force. Spring
length should not exceed 2.76" (70.2 mm) and spring force should not
be less than 197-347 lbs. (27-48 kg).
3) Replace tension pulley spring if not within specification.
Installation
1) Pull tensioner fully toward water pump side and
temporarily tighten retaining bolt. Ensure No. 4 cylinder is at TDC on
compression stroke by rotating crankshaft until keyway aligns with
mark on front crankshaft seal housing (12 o'clock). Rotate camshaft
until timing mark on cam gear (arrow) aligns with mark on upper
camshaft cover (notch). See Fig. 2.
NOTE: When timing marks are aligned as stated above, No. 4 piston
is at TDC on compression stroke.
2) Position timing belt over crankshaft sprocket, oil pump
sprocket, camshaft sprocket and tensioner in that order. Ensure belt
is positioned in sequence given and without slack between sprockets.
Loosen tension sprocket adjusting bolt allowing spring tension to
tighten belt. Tighten adjusting bolt temporarily.
3) Temporarily install crankshaft pulley bolt and rotate
crankshaft 2 complete revolutions in opposite direction of engine
rotation, until marks on crankshaft and front oil seal retainer are
aligned again. See Fig. 2. Loosen tensioner lock bolt, allowing
tesioner spring to fully adjust tension. Tighten tensioner lock bolt.
4) Install timing belt covers. To complete installation,
reverse removal procedures. Tighten all bolts to specification. See
TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS table at end of this article.
Fig. 2: 2.3L & 2.6L Timing Alignment Marks
Courtesy of Isuzu Motor Co

Dec 13, 2010 | 1989 Isuzu Pickup 2WD

1 Answer

Problem with my car 09/21/2010. A Battery is good, cable are good, inspected fuses on the driver's side ( Fuse panel all good). Radio, window e.c.t. work. I'm tried jump hear click, click, and click but I...


Hi! This most likely the problem when you try to crank and no start.
missfire- low power sparkplug
selonoid- not enough power going to the starter or Starter it self.
Bad Sensor- Into Intake Manifold, Oil Pressure, EGR, Carburator. Exshaust.
Belt- on to Camshaft, Cam gear, or Gear chain.
Fuel- gas line, fuel filter, fuel pump, low flow into fuel line or No fuel,
Bad Timing Belt on to camshaft or crankshaft.
My best bet is your AC Compressor Camshaft pully and your Crankshaft pully. Try this if I was right. Try to move the tension on the main motor belt, if it's tight, try moving the pully by hand, and if the compressor and crankshaft pully move or wable just a little. This means the berring of the pully are worn out and this cause the lost timing starter. but lets make sure, let someone look at the cam pully or the crankshaft pully while trying to start, if the pully moves, This mean that your pully need to be replace. this will cause to lack the Ignition,.To my last bet also check your Catalitic Converter mostt likely they get burned out when you keep trying to crank the car with no start, also check your ignition switch, hope this will solve the problem
P.S. some cars have a Intel switch also know the Fuel switch is located on the pasenger or driver seat. this will cause the fuel flowing into the gas intel line. press it in to reset.

Glad to help.
Ginskie,



Sep 22, 2010 | 1994 Mazda MPV

1 Answer

When replacing the timing belt on a 1994 ford escort, on the crankshaft pully. do i line up the arrow @ 12 o'clock or the keyway


Check out my Tips and Tricks on my profile page, There is one there that explains the entire timing alignment procedure. Hope this helps, let me know.

Aug 22, 2010 | 1994 Ford Escort

3 Answers

Having changed the timing belt on my 307 2.0L petrol 2003 how do I re-align the valve timing. I have cam lock tools in place but there is no timing alignment on the crank pully - the pully and crank end...


hi i have a 307 2.0 petrol on a 05 plate how do i time up the bottom end of the engine it has no timming maksand its a free wheeling crank many thanks kev

Aug 21, 2009 | 2005 Peugeot 405

2 Answers

How to line up no1 cylinder on TDC on 1998 Daewoo Lanos SOHC. Have got the cam sprocket on its correct marking, but the crankshaft pulley has only pick up coil on it no timing mark Thanks John Gold Coast...


Ibring piston to compression stroke. Apiece of tissue in the plug hole will blow out and then turn crank by hand until the piston is at the top. There should be timing mstks on the crankshaft pully.no timing marks? Then ease the crank around untill the piston starts to go done you can feel the piston with a straw. Note, the crank pully keyway more than like be at the 12 oclock position. good luck

Jun 09, 2009 | 1999 Daewoo Lanos

2 Answers

1989 Isuzu pickup how to align timing marks on cam and crank?


The Isuzu is a strange animal-when you do the timing belt you set it with #1 TDC "BUT" the distributor is timed with TDC #4 I found this the hard way and finally had to buy a cd with the procedures on it. Send me an e-mail address and I will forward the associated pictures &
info to you.
Jim Young
jmysr@hotmail.com

TIMING BELT & SPROCKETS R & I
NOTE: Some procedures may differ slightly due to engine
construction.
Removal
1) Remove all necessary air ducts. Position No. 4 piston at
TDC of compression stroke. Align timing marks. See Fig. 2. Remove fan
and fan shroud. Remove belts. If necessary, remove radiator and
splashguard.
2) Prevent engine from rotating and remove crankshaft timing
pulley retaining bolt. Remove upper and lower timing belt covers.
Remove spring from tension pulley. Loosen adjusting bolt and move
pulley toward water pump. Remove timing belt.
CAUTION: Ensure pistons are at TDC when rotating camshaft or damage
may result.
Inspection
1) Handle timing belt carefully. Avoid twisting or kinking
belt. Do not allow belt to become contaminated by water, oil, dirt or
other contaminates. Inspect belt for cracks or damage. If necessary,
replace.
2) Measure tension pulley spring length and force. Spring
length should not exceed 2.76" (70.2 mm) and spring force should not
be less than 197-347 lbs. (27-48 kg).
3) Replace tension pulley spring if not within specification.
Installation
1) Pull tensioner fully toward water pump side and
temporarily tighten retaining bolt. Ensure No. 4 cylinder is at TDC on
compression stroke by rotating crankshaft until keyway aligns with
mark on front crankshaft seal housing (12 o’clock). Rotate camshaft
until timing mark on cam gear (arrow) aligns with mark on upper
camshaft cover (notch). See Fig. 2.
NOTE: When timing marks are aligned as stated above, No. 4 piston
is at TDC on compression stroke.
2) Position timing belt over crankshaft sprocket, oil pump
sprocket, camshaft sprocket and tensioner in that order. Ensure belt
is positioned in sequence given and without slack between sprockets.
Loosen tension sprocket adjusting bolt allowing spring tension to
tighten belt. Tighten adjusting bolt temporarily.
3) Temporarily install crankshaft pulley bolt and rotate
crankshaft 2 complete revolutions in opposite direction of engine
rotation, until marks on crankshaft and front oil seal retainer are
aligned again. See Fig. 2. Loosen tensioner lock bolt, allowing
tesioner spring to fully adjust tension. Tighten tensioner lock bolt.
4) Install timing belt covers. To complete installation,
reverse removal procedures. Tighten all bolts to specification. See
TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS table at end of this article.
Fig. 2: 2.3L & 2.6L Timing Alignment Marks
Courtesy of Isuzu Motor Co.

Jun 05, 2009 | 1989 Isuzu Pickup 2WD

4 Answers

HELP!!!!need timing marks for pajero 94 2.8 auto *** import


there is a little mark on the crankshaft which you line up with the 'o' mark on the casing ..
remove the cam cover and look at the cam you should see a nob on the cam about 3 th lob and that should be facing just left of the engine ..
if you have a turbo there is two notchs on the injection pump pully ..if turbo there is a 't' mark on the rear of the cover the notch on the pully should mark up with the 't'..
the timing is set..

Feb 05, 2009 | 1994 Mitsubishi Montero

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