Question about 1999 Subaru Forester

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1999 auto, Subaru Forrester: Noise appears coming from rear centered, associated with speed, like a helicopter ... differential?

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It may be a bad differential but also check to make sure nothing is caught on the drive shaft

Posted on Sep 30, 2009

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1 Answer

97 subaru legacy and 98 subaru forrester is the CV axle the same


all early 90's subaru's had the same front axles
the rear axles on some are different due to the limited slip differentials

Aug 15, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I know where the sensor 2 is but where is the bank 1 for my 1999 subaru forrester code PO 141 O2 sensor heater bank1 sensor 2?


For 1999 Subaru Truck Forester AWD 2.5L MFI 4cyl the Oxygen Sensor is located under hood, center, rear engine area, mounted on catalytic converter.

zjlimited_1032.jpg

Fig. Oxygen sensor location-Forester 1998-2002 2.5L SOHC engine (click over image for zoom).

Generally, Bank 1 is front and Bank 2 is rear.

Hope helps.

Apr 14, 2011 | 1999 Subaru Forester

1 Answer

1999 Subaru Forester has developed a shake when accelerating, esp. between 20-30 mph. Wheel bearings replaced - didn't help. Tires checked, balanced, etc. - didn't help. Front end allignment - didn't help....


Auto or 5-speed?
Subarus have CV axles in front and back. And a drive shaft from the center differential of the transmission to the back differential.

Yes, it could be the drive shaft or axle. If you turn the car hard left or right do you hear any noises - usually a 'clicking' sound? This is likely a CV axle in front.

Check the fluid in the transmission (Automatic) (info is in the Owner's Manual) to make sure it's full and/or gear oil in the front differential.

If it's an Automatic transmission, the fluid may need changed - NOT FLUSHED - if it has more than 30K miles since last changed.
GL,
TD

Sep 10, 2010 | 1999 Subaru Forester

3 Answers

Rear cluch not working


Depends on what model and components you have:

{ ...
ENGINE TORQUE DISTRIBUTION – DIRECTING THE FLOW OF POWER
In an all-wheel-drive vehicle, engine power can be directed to all four wheels. Subaru Symmetrical AWD differs slightly from model to model in how it directs power to the wheels, depending on its transmission.

MODELS WITH FIVE-SPEED MANUAL TRANSMISSION – CONTINUOUS ALL-WHEEL DRIVE: A viscous-type locking center differential and limited-slip rear differential help distribute torque – normally configured at a 50/50 split front to rear. If wheel speed differs between front and rear axles, the center and/or rear differentials lock up to help distribute power to the wheels with the most traction.

MODELS WITH FOUR-SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS – ACTIVE ALL-WHEEL DRIVE: An electronically controlled variable transfer clutch and limited-slip rear differential distribute power to where traction is needed. Sensors monitor parameters such as wheel slippage, throttle position, and braking to help determine torque distribution and direct it to the wheels with optimum traction.

MODELS WITH FIVE-SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION – VARIABLE TORQUE DISTRIBUTION ALL-WHEEL DRIVE: As with Active All-Wheel Drive, an electronically controlled variable transfer clutch distributes power, but through a planetary-type center differential and a viscous-type limited-slip rear differential. Torque distribution is normally configured at a performance-oriented rear-wheel-biased 45/55 split front to rear. Sensors monitor the same parameters as for Active All-Wheel Drive.

WRX STI, WITH SIX-SPEED MANUAL TRANSMISSION – DRIVER CONTROLLED CENTER DIFFERENTIAL (DCCD) ALL-WHEEL DRIVE: The STI uses an electronically managed multi-plate transfer clutch and a mechanical limited-slip differential in conjunction with a planetary-gear-type center differential to control power distribution between the front and rear wheels. Featuring manual and three automatic modes, DCCD is normally configured at a 41/59 split front to rear. Sensors monitor parameters such as wheel slippage, steering angle, throttle position, and braking to help determine torque distribution and direct it to the wheels with optimum traction. DCCD also features a limited-slip helical front and Torsen® rear differential. ... }

And what are the symptoms? How do you know the coupling to the rear is not working?

Jun 05, 2010 | 1995 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

For 2001 Forrester Subaru - Front Windshield Washer fuse


If it makes noise, it's not the fuse. Most likely the discharge nozzles are stopped up. Try blowing compressed air into them from the outside.

Dec 19, 2009 | 2001 Subaru Forester

1 Answer

Turbo 2ooo i think it might be some sort off bushes


juddering is UK english for shuddering in US english. The center bearing shouldn't move, i/e/ the shaft should rotate w/o side play in the bearing, but the rubber mounts for the bearing should be flexible. The needle bearings in the universal joints in the front to rear drive shaft can go bad, causing noise when accelerating and they're not changeable w/o special tools. Your problem also sounds like differential, which would mean that you need to change the gear oil in the rear differential. As the oil ages it stops working properly in the limited slip differential even if visually OK. Do the front differential at the same time, engine heat ages it even faster. The center diff is in the AT, so you would change the AT filter and fluid.
How to tell which problem you have... in a parking lot with dry pavement, stop the vehicle, turn the wheel hard right, accelerate a moment, and repeat hard left and centered. If its worse turning, than straight suspect the differential fluids first. If its the same turning or not and especially if its the same on wet or dry pavement and at slow and high speed then look into the propeller shaft first.

Apr 03, 2009 | 1991 Subaru Legacy

2 Answers

2002 honda cr-v awd makes clicking noise when turning


Take it to a different shop, and ask them to check the wheel bearings and the cv joints for the clicking noise.

Jan 30, 2009 | 1999 Subaru Forester

1 Answer

Center differential


What you are discribing sure sounds like CV (constant volocity) joint noise from the axle(s), diff's don't make crunching noises, they whine and howl when they go bad, I will say this about your problem, you did not have it before the work was done, so it's a fair guess it has something to do with the work done, make them fix it, do you agree?

Oct 21, 2008 | 1999 Subaru Forester

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