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I have a 1998 ford expeditionthat fron driveshaft fell off due to univeral failure. The transfer case leaked oil on ground. What does this mean. awroby

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: front driveshaft fell off due to universal

Get some help. Put it in gear. One of you look under it see if the drive line is turning. if it is. The splin in the rear end -Where the big nut is. may be broke. mine did. If it don't turn. It broke the back tail pace in the trans.

Ken

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

Testimonial: "I was impressed with the response from FixYa. Thank you for your help. awroby"

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2001 chevy blazer transfer case removal


How to Remove a Chevy Blazer Rear Transfer Case The transfer case on a Chevrolet Blazer is underneath the vehicle, mounted to the rear of the transmission. On four-wheel drive vehicles, the transfer case takes power generated by the engine and channeled through the transmission and directs it to the front and rear drive axles. Over time, the gears and bearings inside the transfer case can wear and the transfer case must be rebuilt. The transfer case on this vehicle must be removed before it can be serviced.
Things You'll Need
  • Wrench set
  • Floor jack
  • Jack stands
  • Socket set
  • Masking tape
  • Marker
  • Needle-nose pliers
Hide Instructions
  1. Removing the Driveshafts
    • 1 Disconnect the ground cable from the negative battery terminal, by using a wrench to loosen the retaining bolt and pulling the clamp off the terminal.
  • 2 Raise the vehicle and support with jack stands placed underneath the frame.
  • 3 Drain the transfer case. Locate the drain plug near the bottom of the transfer case. Place a waste oil collection pan underneath the plug and use a socket to remove it. Once all the fluid has drained out, reinstall the plug.
  • 4 Remove the bolts that connect the rear driveshaft to the rear axle yoke using a socket. Lower the driveshaft, and slide it backward underneath the rear axle to disengage it from the transfer case. Remove it from the vehicle.
  • 5 Remove the bolts that connect the front driveshaft to the front axle yoke using a socket. Lower the driveshaft, and slide it forward underneath the front axle to disengage it from the transfer case. Remove the driveshaft from the vehicle.
  • Removing the Transfer Case
    • 6 Label and disconnect the electrical wires and vacuum lines connected to the transfer case. Use masking tape and a marker.
    • 7 Remove the transfer case shifter rod. Using needle-nose pliers, remove the clip that connects the shifter rod to the transfer case. Slide the rod away from the transfer case.
    • 8 Position a floor jack underneath the transfer case. Raise it enough to take the weight of the transfer case off the transmission.
    • 9 Remove the bolts that connect the transfer case to the transmission using a socket or wrench.
    • 10 Slide the transfer case rearward to disengage it from the transfer case. Lower the floor jack, and remove the transfer case from the vehicle

    Jul 27, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    How to remove transfer case from 2002 tahoe


    • Disconnect the ground cable from the negative battery terminal, by using a wrench to loosen the retaining bolt and pulling the clamp off the terminal.

    • 2

      Raise the vehicle and support with jack stands placed underneath the frame.

    • 3

      Drain the transfer case. Locate the drain plug near the bottom of the transfer case. Place a waste oil collection pan underneath the plug and use a socket to remove it. Once all the fluid has drained out, reinstall the plug.

    • 4

      Remove the bolts that connect the rear driveshaft to the rear axle yoke using a socket. Lower the driveshaft, and slide it backward underneath the rear axle to disengage it from the transfer case. Remove it from the vehicle.

    • 5

      Remove the bolts that connect the front driveshaft to the front axle yoke using a socket. Lower the driveshaft, and slide it forward underneath the front axle to disengage it from the transfer case. Remove the driveshaft from the vehicle.

    Removing the Transfer Case
    • 1

      Label and disconnect the electrical wires and vacuum lines connected to the transfer case. Use masking tape and a marker.

    • 2

      Remove the transfer case shifter rod. Using needle-nose pliers, remove the clip that connects the shifter rod to the transfer case. Slide the rod away from the transfer case.

    • 3

      Position a floor jack underneath the transfer case. Raise it enough to take the weight of the transfer case off the transmission.

    • 4

      Remove the bolts that connect the transfer case to the transmission using a socket or wrench.

    • 5

      Slide the transfer case rearward to disengage it from the transfer case. Lower the floor jack, and remove the transfer case from the vehicle.


    Jan 20, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    Can a faulty transmission case blow the transmission


    if the case is damaged and allowing the loss of oil then it will cause damage to the geabox commonly known as ford exploder due to comon problem with the gearbox /transfere case failure of internal components

    Apr 06, 2011 | 1996 Ford Explorer

    1 Answer

    Transfer case on 2006 F150 will engage but no power to front wheels?


    SOUNDS LIKE A BAD HUB TRY THIS TO DIAGNOSE THE PROBLEM

    Put the transmission in park, set the parking brake and raise the chassis so one of the front wheels is off the ground while the other is still on the ground. When the transfer case is in two-wheel drive, the hubs should be released allowing the wheels to turn freely when spun by hand. If the axle shaft turns when you spin the wheel, it means the hub has not disengaged.
    To check engagement, rotate the axle shaft backwards. This should lock the hub. Try turning the wheel by hand again. The axle shaft should now turn with the wheel if the hub is locked. If the hub fails to lock, the hub will have to be disassembled and inspected or replaced.
    To check release, hold the axle shaft steady and rotate the wheel backwards. You should hear a click as the locking mechanism slides back out and disengages the hub. Rotate the wheel forward again and it should turn freely.
    Another way to check the hubs is to raise the vehicle on a frame contact lift so all four wheels are off the ground. Then start the engine and place the transfer case in four-wheel drive and the transmission in drive. If the front wheels don't turn, look at the front axle shafts. If both shafts are turning, but one wheel is not, the problem is a bad hub on the wheel that isn't turning. If the front driveshafts are not turning when the transfer case is in four-wheel drive, the problem is inside the differential (broken side gears) or the transfer case (broken chain, shift linkage, etc.). If the driveshaft between the transfer case and differential is turning, the problem is in the differential. If the driveshaft is not turning, the vehicle is going to need repairs to the transfer case.
    Hope this helps.

    Dec 28, 2010 | 2006 Ford F-150

    3 Answers

    4wheel drive wont engage


    First, start checking the fuses an there is also an electrial activaced switch at the transmission or transfer case that may be bad.

    95-96
    Your control knob should say 2wd, 4auto, 4low.

    First, we need to narrow it down to a transfer case issue, or a front axle issue.
    Step 1) Jack up the front end and place it securely on jack stands.
    Step 2) Verify that the front driveshaft turns by hand. When turning the front driveshaft by hand, the front wheels may or may not turn. Do not be alarmed if they don't turn. This is normal for your vehicle.
    Step 3) Start the vehicle and let it idle. Place your foot firmly on the brakes, place the transmission in NEUTRAL, engage 4low, then place the vehicle back in park. DO NOT ENGAGE ANY GEAR!! The lurch as the transmission engages could cause the vehicle to lurch and potentially fall off the jack stands.**If you can turn the front driveshaft, the transfer case is not locking. This could be due to a mechanical issue with the transfer case itself, or an electrical gremlin with the control system. Start a new thread with the results of your checks, and we'll go from there.
    **If the front driveshaft does not turn, the transfer case is locking properly and we need to continue searching.
    Step 4) With the front wheels in the air, engine idling in PARK, spin one front wheel. The other wheel should spin the opposite direction. If both wheels spin in opposite directions, then the front axle *should* be properly engaged. Take it for a test drive (after safely lowering it to the ground, of course). If the front wheels do not spin in opposite directions, there is a problem with the front axle. This could be due to a mechanical problem with the diff, or a failure of the center axle disconnect to engage the passenger side axle shaft. Start a new thread with the results of your checks, and we'll go from there.

    Troubleshooting the CAD on a 95-96 is a bit more involved than I want to get into here, and the problems can vary widely. This'll get you started.


    97-01 4-door and 96-00 Sports
    Your control knob should say 4auto, 4high, 4low.
    First, we need to narrow it down to a transfer case issue, or a front axle issue.

    Step 1) Jack up the front end and place it securely on jack stands.

    Step 2) Verify that the front driveshaft turns by hand. When turning the front driveshaft by hand, the front wheels should turn. (If only one turns, don't be alarmed. One wheel sometimes has more resistance in the brakes, bearings, or CV joints. This is normal)
    Step 3) Start the vehicle and let it idle in PARK. Engage 4high. DO NOT PUT THE VEHICLE IN GEAR!!! Crawl underneath and see if you can turn the front driveshaft.
    **If you can turn the front driveshaft, the transfer case is not locking. This could be due to a mechanical issue with the transfer case itself, or an electrical gremlin with the control system. Start a new thread with the results of your checks, and we'll go from there.
    **If the front driveshaft does not turn, the transfer case is locking properly and we need to continue searching.
    Step 4) With the front wheels in the air, engine idling in PARK, spin one front wheel. The other wheel should spin the opposite direction. If both wheels spin in opposite directions, then the front axle *should* be properly engaged. Take it for a test drive (after safely lowering it to the ground, of course). If the front wheels do not spin in opposite directions, there is a problem with the front axle. Start a new thread with the results of your checks, and we'll go from there.


    '01-'03 Sport and '01-'05 Sport Trac
    Your control knob should say 2wd, 4high, 4low

    The transfer case in these trucks functions essentially like the 1st-gens' 13-54 t-case. (i.e. it uses a lockup collar engaged by the transfer case shift motor) The troubleshooting procedure is very similar, but you don't need to worry about hubs or center-axle disconnects engaging.

    Step 1) Jack up the front end and place it securely on jack stands.
    Step 2) Verify that the front driveshaft turns by hand. When turning the front driveshaft by hand, the front wheels should turn. (If only one turns, don't be alarmed. One wheel sometimes has more resistance in the brakes, bearings, or CV joints. This is normal)
    Step 3) Start the vehicle and let it idle in PARK. Engage 4high. DO NOT PUT THE VEHICLE IN GEAR!!! Crawl underneath and see if you can turn the front driveshaft.
    **If you can turn the front driveshaft, the transfer case is not locking. The shift motor could be falsely reading an incorrect t-case position, or it could be a mechanical issue with the case itself. Start a new thread with the results of your checks, and we'll go from there.
    **If the front driveshaft does not turn, the transfer case is locking properly and we need to continue searching.
    Step 4) With the front wheels in the air, engine idling in PARK, spin one front wheel. The other wheel should spin the opposite direction. If it does, the system should be properly engaged. Safely lower the vehicle to the ground and take it for a test drive. If the wheels do NOT spin in opposite directions, there is a problem with the front differential or axle. Start a new thread with the results of your checks, and we'll go from there.


    Keep us updated.

    Dec 16, 2010 | 1996 Ford Explorer

    1 Answer

    1998 blazer 4x4. Not sure if shift solenoid issue or transmission control module. Truck died no engagement in any gear no fluid pumped. Thought old 4l60e pump quit (had a pump or converter whine when I...


    Even if all the electronics were dead you still should have movement in some gear, usually reverse and 2nd. If you put the transmission in park [and have both back tires off of the ground a bit] can you turn the rear driveshaft by hand? If so then the transfer case isn't connecting the driveshaft to the transmission. If the driveshaft won't turn then you know it''s connected internally and can look elsewhere. Only other thing I can think of is possibly the front pump in this 4L60E may be damaged and not capable of pumping any oil. You could disconnect one of the cooler lines and see if it pumps any oil out with the engine running. No oil means no pump action. Hope this helps a bit and good luck!

    Jun 30, 2010 | Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    Transfer case removal


    Suzuki Samurai/Sidekick/Tracker 1986-1998 Repair Guide
    Transfer Case Assembly - REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

    Samurai Models
    Even the 2WD Samurai uses a transfer case. Rather than use a straight line driveshaft from the transmission to the differential, the Samurai leaves the transfer case in place and replaces its internal working with a simple offset gear mechanism, thus keeping 2 of the 3 driveshafts used in the 4WD vehicle.
    1. On 4WD vehicles, remove the transfer case shift lever.
    2. Raise and support the vehicle safely.
    3. Drain the oil from the transfer case.
    4. Matchmark and remove the driveshafts from the transfer case assembly. Not all of the driveshafts need to be completely removed from the vehicle, just unbolted from the case flanges. In most cases, the shaft or shafts on one side of the transfer case can be repositioned and supported out of the way.
    5. Support the transfer case using a suitable transmission jack.
    6. Disconnect the speedometer cable from the transfer case.
    7. On 4WD vehicles, disconnect the 4WD switch lead wire at the coupler.
    8. Remove the three mounting bolts and/or nuts securing the transfer case to the chassis, as applicable.
    9. Carefully lower the transfer case from the vehicle.
    To install:
    1. Position and install the transfer case. Tighten the mounting bolts to 159-248 inch lbs. (18-28 Nm) and/or the mounting nuts to 19-25 ft. lbs. (25-34 Nm).
    2. On 4WD vehicles, connect the 4WD switch lead wire at the coupler.
    3. Connect the speedometer cable to the transfer case.
    4. Properly refill the transfer case with an approved type of gear oil.
    5. Align and install the driveshafts to the transfer case.
    6. On 4WD vehicles, install the transfer case shift lever.
    7. Remove the jackstands and carefully lower the vehicle.
    Sidekick, Tracker, Sidekick Sport and X-90 Models
    On these models the transfer case is bolted to the transmission and takes the place of the 2WD transmission's extension housing. Therefore, transfer case is removed or installed as part of the transmission assembly.

    Hope this help (remember rated this and comment).

    Mar 21, 2010 | 1993 Geo Tracker

    1 Answer

    The oil is leaking from my car i think that the oil pump is damaged because oil is leaking very bad


    Unless you've run it out of engine oil because of the bad leaks , oil leaks are are not a sign of a bad oil pump , what is a sign of a bad oil pump is low or no oil pressure either due to lack of oil for the pump to pick up in the oil sump or either a mechanical failure of the oil pump, in which case you would have some internal damage to your engine. In either case if you plan to keep the car then by all means have the oil leaks investigated and repaired so the the oil stays inside the motor instead of the outside and on the ground making your driveway look horrible...

    Oct 05, 2009 | 1991 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

    1 Answer

    Front driveshaft fell off due to universal failure. It is a 1998 expedition. It won't move forward or back.


    Get some help. Put it in gear. One of you look under it see if the drive line is turning. if it is. The splin in the rear end -Where the big nut is. may be broke. mine did. If it don't turn. It broke the back tail pace in the trans.

    Ken

    Sep 25, 2009 | Ford Expedition Cars & Trucks

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