Question about 2005 Mercury Mountaineer

1 Answer

I have an electrical problem. When unhook my negative clamp form battery i can get 12 volts from my negative post to a body ground. So I have a short somewhere. Where would it be.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 582 Answers

IF YOU UNHOOK THE NEGATIVE CLAMP FROM THE BATTERY AND YOU STILL GET A READING FROM NEGATIVE POST ON THE BATTERY TO THE FRAME YOUR METER IS COMPLETING THE 12 VOLT CIRCUIT AND THAT IS WHY YOUR READING 12 VOLTS ON YOUR METER. SOME BATTERY CABLES HAVE A SECOND GROUND FROM THE CABLE TO THE FRAME BUT IS CONNECTED AT THE BATTERY POST SUCH AS A FUSEABLE LINK WHEN YOU DISCONNECT THE CABLE YOU DISCONNECT THE GROUND. IF YOU HAD A SHORT AND READ 12 VOLTS THRU THE GROUND YOU WOULD DEFINETLY SEE SMOKE

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My 2000 tracker ocasionally stops charging the bat. and has a relay under the dash that clicks repetitively after the key is turned off, the alt , bat. & relay have been replaced but the prob cont.


Sounds like you have a bad or lose ground , lose connection . Did you check the connections at the alternator ?
Two minute Voltage drop test everybody should learn> and use on every car> they work> on..
1. measure from the positive battery POST to the negative battery post.. 14.1 to 14.8 volts is expected. engine running !
2. measure from the Negative battery post to the engine block... 0.04 volts is expected..
3. measure from the negative battery post to the body........................ 0.02 volts is expected.
4. measure from the ENGINE BLOCK to the BODY ............................... 0.02 volts is expected..

If you get more than the 0.04 or 0.02 volts... you have a bad ground between those parts.. a little over can be do to an undersized ground wire.. this test takes about 2 minutes to do.. including the time it takes to get the volt meter out. It will find all the gremlins... save> your hours of work chasing ghosts. Good luck an hope this helps !

Apr 14, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to find a short in your car that drains your battery


first; purchase a 12 volt test light from an autoparts store; these look like a screwdriver with a lamp in the handle and, a spike where the screwdriver tip would be; The lamp is attached to a cord that exits the rear of the test light and, terminates in a alligator clip. When the tip of the test light is attached to a 12 volt source; like a positive post of a battery and, the cord of the test light is grounded; like on the negative post of a battery the test light lamp will light, Letting you know that electricity is moving: (doing work) Sometimes electricity will move when it should not, this makes your battery run down, over time. This problem usually can not be found unless you do this: remove the negative battery clamp from the negative battery post then: connect the test light alligator clip to the negative clamp you just removed, and the test light spike to the negative battery post. The lamp should light. This indicates that you have a short to ground: a "leak" that is draining your battery as, if there is no light from the test light you have no problems unless you have a domelight on or, the ignition in the on position for in a "good" car nothing should be lighting the test light bulb.
If you see a bright light you have a big short. If you see a dim light check your alternator for a short through the diodes. With the front door open and, the door button held closed, key off; Look at the lit test light and, start pulling fuses one at a time until the test light goes off; this is the "bad" circuit. Then: replace the "bad" fuse and, just check everything in that circuit one part at a time until the test light goes off again...you have found the problem that causes your battery to run down.

on Apr 06, 2010 | Ford F Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Does a 12 volt test light need a battery


No, it doesn't take a battery. Just a bulb and a ground lead with a clip on the end-to clamp to a ground source. You can check the bulb and the test light operation by touching the ground lead to negative battery post, then touch the probe end to the positive post-tester should light up brightly.

Jun 16, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I need to jump a Toyota with another toyota. I need to know if my old 2005 4 cylinder Toyota has a 12 volt battery ?


Yes it does-positive to positive first, negative to negative and you should try to hook the negative clamps to metal body parts instead of the battery to avoid sparks-like a bolt on the engines of each vehicle.

Dec 24, 2010 | 2005 Toyota Camry Solara

2 Answers

Battery going dead


Hi. What an annoyance for you. Hello. Drive to any auto parts store and have them check your battery and charging system.
Your battery may need to be replaced. IF they can not find a problem, drive to an autoelectric repair shop where they will have the diagnostic tools to locate the drain on your battery and repair it. J.

Jul 31, 2010 | 1992 Buick LeSabre

2 Answers

My 1997 jeep grand cherokee tsi with a 5.2 seems to have a charging problem. the alternator is a year old and was tested twice in the last week at 2 different locations and was shown to be good. same thing...


How is the pigtail ground strap from engine block to body? Have you had engine diagnostic test done? Voltage rVOLTAGE DROP TEST
A voltage drop test is the only effective way to find excessive resistance in high amperage circuits. It's a quick and easy test that doesn't require any disassembly and will quickly show you whether or not you've got a good connection or a bad one.
To do a voltage drop test, you create a load in the circuit that's being tested. Then you use a digital volt meter (DVM) to measure the voltage drop across the live connection while it is under the load. Voltage always follows the path of least resistance, so if the circuit or connection being tested has too much resistance some of the voltage will flow through the DVM and create a voltage reading.
voltage_drop.jpg

If a connection is good, you should find little or no voltage drop and see less than 0.4 volts for most connections, and ideally less than 0.1 volts. But if you find more than a few tenths of a voltage drop across a connection, it indicates excessive resistance and a need for cleaning or repair.
CHECKING THE STARTER CIRCUIT
To check the starter circuit for excessive resistance, you need to measure the voltage drop at the battery, battery cable connections and starter while the engine is being cranked.
The first check is "available battery voltage." For the starter to crank at normal speed, the battery must be at least 75% charged (12.4 volts or higher). Low battery voltage can not only affect the starter but every other electrical system in the vehicle.
A. Set your DVM to the 20 volt scale, then connect meter positive (+) lead to battery positive (+) post (not the clamp or cable), and the meter negative (-) lead to battery negative (-) post.
B. Disable the engine so it will not start when it is cranked. (Ground the ignition coil wire, or disable the ignition circuit or fuel pump relay.) Limit cranking time to 15 seconds or less.
C. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading on the DVM. D. Next, connect your meter positive (+) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter, and the meter negative (-) lead to the starter housing.
E. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading.
F. Compare the two voltage readings. If both are the same, there are no excessive voltage drops on the positive feed side.
G. If available voltage at the starter is not within one (1) volt of battery voltage, there is excessive voltage drop in the circuit.
The next test is for voltage drop on the positive side of the starter circuit.
A. Make sure the battery is fully charged.
B. Disable ignition.
C. Set DVM on 2 volt scale.
D. Connect meter positive (+) lead to positive (+) battery post, and the meter negative (-) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter. While cranking the engine, record the voltage reading.
The maximum allowable voltage drop including the solenoid or external relay in the starter circuit should be 0.6 volts or less.
If you find more than a 0.6 volt drop in the starter circuit, you can isolate the bad connection by using the following voltage drop tests.
* Check the positive battery post and cable connection by measuring the voltage drop between the two while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the battery post and the meter negative lead to the cable clamp. A good post/cable connection should have zero voltage drop.
* Check the positive battery cable by measuring the voltage drop end to end while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the clamp on the positive battery cable, and the meter negative lead to the end of the cable at the starter. Crank the engine and note the voltage reading. A good cable should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
* To check the starter solenoid or relay connections, connect the meter positive lead to positive battery terminal on the solenoid or relay, and the meter negative lead to the starter motor terminal. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
Next, you need to check the negative side of the starter circuit. To check the entire circuit, connect the meter positive lead to a clean spot on the starter motor case and the meter negative lead to the negative battery post. Crank the engine and note the reading. The voltage drop on the negative side should be 0.3 volts or less.
If the voltage drop is too high, set your DVM to the 2 volt scale and start checking each connection on the negative side to find the bad connection or cable. Use the DVM leads to check across each connection while cranking the engine as before.
Check the negative battery post/ground cable connection (should be zero voltage drop).
Check the negative ground cable from the battery to the engine (should be 0.2 volts or less).
Check between the negative battery post and starter housing (should be 0.3 volts or less).
Check between the engine block and starter housing (should be 0.10 volts or less).
CHECKING THE CHARGING CIRCUIT
To check the alternator connections on the positive side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect the meter positive lead to the alternator output stud (B+ terminal).
C. Connect the meter negative lead to the positive (+) battery post.
D. With the engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except the rear electric defroster), check the voltage drop reading. It should be 0.5 volts or less. If higher, the connections between the alternator output stud and battery need to be cleaned. Also, look for loose connections or undersized cables.
To check the alternator connections on the negative side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect meter negative lead to alternator case.
C. Connect meter positive lead to battery negative (-) post.
D. With engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except rear defogger), check the voltage drop reading. On the negative side, it should be 0.2 volts or less. If excessive, the connections need cleaning or the negative cable needs to be replaced. Some alternators are mounted in rubber bushings and have a separate ground strap. If so equipped, be sure to check the voltage drop across this strap, too.

egulator checked with voltmeter?

Nov 15, 2009 | 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Trying to install narva driving lamps unit has


In 12 volt DC automotive electrical systems black is always the ground wire or negative. Make sure you disconnect the battery before doing any electrical work (unhook the negative cable first). Don't splice into any wires under the dash, use a piggyback fuse connector on one of the accessory fuses eg; cigarette lighter.

Sep 20, 2009 | 2008 Toyota RAV4

1 Answer

Electricl problem.


Clean the battery posts and cable ends real good with some course sandpaper or a real terminal brush. If you have those clamp on replacement cable ends take them apart, clean everything good, Clean any corrosion off the cable, clamp it all back together good and tight. Or better yet replace both battery cables with new battery cables with made on ends. Check where the other end of both cables go. Clean that connection good. Check negative post to ground for ohms, should be near zero. Check positive post to ground for volts, should be 12-1/2 to 13. Maybe the battery has a dead cell.

Mar 19, 2009 | 1986 Chevrolet Chevy

1 Answer

Voltage drop test


First, check battery post to cable connection: positive meter lead on battery positive post, negaitve lead on battery's positive cable clamp. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have zero voltage drop. Second, check the positive cable: positve meter lead on positive battery clamp, negative lead on starter terminal connector. A good cable will show a voltage drop of .2 volts or less while cranking. Third, check the starter connection: positive meter lead on positive battery terminal on the solenoid, negative meter lead on actual starter stud. A good connection will have a voltage drop of near zero volts. Now to check the negative side of the circuit. Total drop on the ground side should be .3 volts or less and can be checked by placing positive meter lead on starter housing and negative meter lead on battery ground post. Take your reading while cranking the engine, and be sure your connection at the starter is solid and clean. If total voltage drop on this side of the circuit is excessive, complete testing at all connections in the same fashion as the positive side of the circuit. Check the following: between battery post and clamp (zero voltage drop), cable end at battery to cable end at engine. (.2 volts or less), cable end at engine to engine itself (near zero voltage drop), and finally between starter housing and engine block (.1 volts or less).

To read the entire procedure for all automotive systems read this artile:
http://www.engine-light-help.com/voltage-drop.html

Aug 31, 2008 | 1997 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

Clicking noise


"Battery has juice" but maybe not enough.
It takes 125-200 amps to start the typical engine.
You need to have any kind of multimeter and have someone measure *on the posts* (not the clamps) to see if the voltage drops significantly while trying to start the engine.

If (for example) the voltage drops from (typically) 12.6 volts DC to ~ 10, then the starter should turn the engine over.
If it drops well below 10 volts, your battery is probably nearing the end of its service life.
(Checking the battery voltage without heavily loading it is useless; because of the change in the chemistry of lead-acid batteries, I have often seen a 12 volt battery apparently charge to as much as 19 volts and not be able to supply enough current to operate the headlights.)

If it drops only a few tenths of a volt, the battery clamps or the cable connected to the starter are not conducting enough to supply the needed current; you would need to remove and clean at least the battery clamps and terminals.
If this doesn't help, then it's time to get really dirty, remove the negative cable (you should be able to see if it is grounded to the block or chassis) and then remove and clean the heavy cable attached to the starter itself.
Don't service ANY electrical items without removing the ground cable from the battery or suffer a nasty surprise if you short a healthy battery.

May 21, 2008 | 1993 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

Not finding what you are looking for?
2005 Mercury Mountaineer Logo

Related Topics:

137 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Mercury Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

75077 Answers

fordexpert

Level 3 Expert

5471 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22095 Answers

Are you a Mercury Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...