Question about 1998 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Testing the fuel system - 1998 Ford Taurus

Posted by on

  • 1 more comment 
  • jwilson12115 Sep 21, 2009

    Just bought a 98 ford taurus for $300. its been sitting for some time at least a couple of years. I had the battery checked. It was bad, so I got it replaced (long story but it was a free one).

    But the engine still would not turn over. So pulled out the starter and had it checked. It was bad so I bought a new starter for $140 and installed it.

    So now it turns over just fine but still wont start.

    So I disconnected the breather hose a sprayed in some starting fluid. As long as we kept spraying starting fluid it ran. As soon as the starting fluid stopped the engine stopped.

    We repeated this a number of times with the same result.

    So is there a way to check the fuel pump or other possible faults without taking out the fuel pump completely? And is it in the fuel tank?

  • chris quammen May 11, 2010

    check relay listen for click when key is first turned on , remove gas cap turn key listen for whirling sound in tank, check valve at fuel rail looks like valve stem depress while covering with rag if it comes out it is getting fuel

  • Mike May 11, 2010

    Um, this question is not clear, what, exactly, are you trying to do?

×

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 811 Answers

Sorry, trying to see if fuel pump is working, it probably is in tank

Posted on Sep 21, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya Mechanic can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repair professionals here in the US.
click here to Talk to a Mechanic (only for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How to fix po171 code I change bk 1&bk sensor and still have the same problem code 171&174


These are lean codes , could be a vacuum leak , mass air flow sensor , low fuel pressure , plugged fuel filter . Having it diagnose by a qualified tech with proper diagnostic equipment (scan tool ) viewing scan data an not guessing should be done. Checking fuel trims , short term and long term , cheking O2 sensor movement .Fuel flow and volume .
002 Fuel System Tests Start Here
003 Fuel System Tests Scan Data Tests
Just replacing parts without proper testing isn't the way to diagnose these type problems on computer controlled engine management systems .

Aug 23, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

What sh0uld fuel press be 99 ford ranger 2.5 4 cyl ?


45 minimum to 65 maximum depending on the injector system
most fuel injector systems operate around the 55 psi mark

Apr 21, 2017 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2006 hyundai elantra Po441 code always on and p 04 55 comes on once in a while I changed purge valve hard to start after putting like 10 dollars in tank changed charcoal canister also


P0455 - OBD-II Trouble Code OBD II Fault Code
  • OBD II P0455
Fault Code Definition
  • Evaporative System Malfunction, Gross Leak
Symptoms
  • Check Engine Light will illuminate
  • In most cases, there are no adverse conditions noticed by the driver
  • In some cases, there may be a noticeable fuel odor caused by the release of fuel vapors
Common Problems That Trigger the P0455 Code
  • Missing fuel cap
  • Defective or damaged fuel cap
  • Distorted or damaged Fuel Tank Filler Neck
  • Torn or punctured Evaporative system hose(s)
  • Defective Fuel Tank Sending Unit gasket or seal
  • Split or damaged Carbon Canister
  • Defective Evaporative Vent Valve and/or Evaporative Purge Valve
  • Defective or damaged fuel tank
  • Defective Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor
Common Misdiagnoses
  • Fuel cap
  • Evaporative Purge Valve
  • Evaporative Vent Valve
Polluting Gases Expelled
  • HCs (Hydrocarbons): Unburned droplets of raw fuel that smell, affect breathing, and contribute to smog
The Basics
The evaporative control (EVAP) system captures any raw fuel evaporating from the fuel storage system (e.g. the fuel tank, filler neck, and fuel cap). Under precise operating conditions-dictated by engine temperature, speed, and load-the EVAP system stores and purges these captured fuel vapors back into the combustion process.

Want to Learn More?
The EVAP system is designed not only to capture, store, and purge any raw fuel vapors that leak from areas in the Fuel Storage system, but also to run a series of self-tests that confirm or deny the operational and vapor holding ability of the system. This is an important task because at least 20 percent of vehicle-produced air pollution originates from malfunctioning Vehicle Fuel Storage systems.
There are many ways to "leak test" the EVAP system, but most perform the leak test when the vehicle is sitting (like over night) or during the initial start-up after the vehicle has been sitting over night. The EVAP system's operational performance is also tracked by the Powertrain Computer by reading the change in the oxygen sensor voltages and short term fuel trim whenever the stored vapors are released or "purged" back into the combustion process. These values should indicate that fuel is being added to the system and that the overall mixture is getting richer. The purging process occurs when the vehicle is under acceleration, which is when most vehicles require additional fuel.

P0455 Diagnostic Theory for Shops and Technicians
The P0455 code indicates that there is a large leak in the EVAP system, but this is somewhat misleading. What the code really indicates is that the EVAP system will not create a significant vacuum when it performs its leak test, as monitored by the Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor.
Here is how the evaporative leak test is performed by the Powertrain Computer:
  1. When the leak test is performed, the vehicle must have been sitting for at least four to eight hours so that the engine temperature and outside air temperature are identical. There must also be between 15 and 85 percent fuel in the tank-this is to provide a baseline for the test since gasoline and diesel are volatile fluids that expand and vaporize easily with warm temperatures.
  2. When the leak test initiates, the Vapor Canister Vent Valve is closed to prevent any fresh air from entering the EVAP system.
  3. The Purge Valve is opened, which allows the engine to create a vacuum in the EVAP system.
  4. After a specified time interval-usually about ten seconds-the Purge Valve is shut off and the vacuum level in the system is measured by the Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor.
  5. Finally, a countdown initiates, which measures the rate at which the vacuum decays in the system. If the vacuum decays much faster than the specified rate or if no amount of vacuum is reached on two consecutive tests, then the Powertrain Computer will fail the EVAP system for a gross leak and trigger the P0455 code.
Common Tests for the Evaporative System
  • The P0455 code is somewhat misleading because the problem may not be a large/gross leak at all. Many systems trigger this code if there is no EVAP flow detected, which is tracked by changes in Short Term Fuel Trim and Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor data. For example, if the Purge Valve is shorted and never closes, it can trigger a P0455. Be ready to think outside of the box when tracking down the cause of a P0455.
  • Retrieve the code and write down the freeze frame information to be used as a baseline to test and verify any repair.
  • Perform a pressurized smoke test. During the test, perform a careful and close examination of the visible hoses, fuel filler neck, installed filler cap, fuel tank, vent valve, purge valve, and vapor holding canister. Open the Throttle Body to make sure there isn't an internal leak that is flowing smoke into the intake manifold. (Be sure to close off the vent valve during the smoke test! If possible, use tape so you don't overwork the electrical portion of the Vent Solenoid by having it energized for too long.)
  • Run an additional smoke test while using the scan tool live data stream feature with the Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor PID in plain view. As the test inserts smoke into the fuel storage system, the Fuel Tank Pressure readings should increase. If the pressure readings do not increase, the system will think that no pressure or vacuum is being created when the EVAP monitor is performed when, in fact, there is a pressure/vacuum being created that Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor is unable to read. The Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor is the primary feedback sensor that the Powertrain Computer relies on for the leak test data each time the EVAP monitor is run.
  • Inspect and test the fuel cap to determine how well it fits onto the Fuel Tank Filler Neck. If the cap will not seal or hold vacuum/pressure, then it can trigger the P0455 code.
  • Verify that the Purge Valve and the Vent Valve work properly and hold vacuum for a sustained amount of time-at least thirty to sixty seconds. If either one of these valves function improperly, the system will not develop and/or hold the proper amount of vacuum. You may have to remove and bench test them. Also be sure to measure the electrical resistance of the solenoids to be sure they are in spec.
  • If all the components seem to function properly, then perform another smoke test of the entire EVAP system, but this time, use your sense of smell. Go around the entire system to see if you can smell any fuel odor. In some cases, the smoke will exit in a manner that is invisible, but there will be evidence of a fuel odor that will lead you to the problem area. This area may be completely hidden by the frame, fuel tank, etc.
  • If all tests fail, clear all the codes and perform a drive cycle test drive to make sure that the code re-sets are what are the freeze frame data points are referring to.
Watch the very good video on the repair of P0441
How to diagnose code P0441 on Hyundai

Sep 20, 2016 | 2006 Hyundai Elantra

2 Answers

Sometimes it won't idle have to drive with two feet


You could have major vacuum leak or a problem with the IAC - idle air control motor . Is your vehicles check engine light on ?
Fuel System
?€¢
Test the fuel system circuits for proper operation. Refer to Fuel Pump Electrical Circuit Diagnosis .


?€¢
Test for low fuel pressure. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .


?€¢
Test for faulty fuel injectors. Refer to Fuel Injector Balance Test with Special Tool , Fuel Injector Balance Test with Tech 2 , Fuel Injector Solenoid Coil Test test procedures.


?€¢
Inspect for fuel contamination. Refer to Alcohol/Contaminants-in-Fuel Diagnosis .


?€¢
Inspect for fuel in the pressure regulator vacuum hose.


?€¢
Ensure each injector harness is connected to the correct injector/cylinder.


?€¢
Inspect for any items which may cause an engine to run rich, long term fuel trim is significantly in the negative range. Refer to Diagnostic Aids for DTC P0172.


?€¢
Inspect for any items which may cause an engine to run lean, long term fuel trim is significantly in the positive range. Refer to Diagnostic Aids for DTC P0171.


Sensor/System
?€¢
Test for conditions which cause an incorrect idle speed.


-
Throttle body tampering, excessive deposits, or damage--Refer to Fuel System Description .


-
Restricted air intake system


-
Large vacuum leak


?€¢
Inspect the air intake ducts for being collapsed, damaged areas, looseness, improper installation, or leaking especially between the mass air flow (MAF) sensor and the throttle body.


?€¢
Inspect crankcase ventilation valve for proper operation.


?€¢
Inspect the throttle position (TP) sensor and related wiring. Refer to DTC P0123 .


?€¢
Monitor the 24X crankshaft position (CKP) and camshaft position (CMP) sensors on scan tool. If both are not responding, test the sensor feed circuit. Both sensors use a separate feed circuit but are internally connected to power. Test all 24X and CMP sensor circuits for intermittents. Refer to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections in Wiring Systems.


?€¢
Monitor the 3X parameter on the scan tool. If the 3X is not responding, inspect the 7X CKP sensor and circuits for intermittents. Inspect the ignition control (IC) circuit, bypass circuit, 3X reference high circuit, and the 3X reference low circuit for intermittents. If these circuits become open, or shorted may not set a DTC immediately, but are capable of causing driveability complaints. Refer to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections in Wiring Systems.


?€¢
Test the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system for proper operation. Refer to Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) System Description .


?€¢
Inspect the Transaxle Range Switch input with the vehicle in drive and the gear selector in drive or overdrive.

Jun 14, 2015 | 2001 Pontiac Montana

1 Answer

Starts but backfires and stalls


Hooking up a professional type scan tool an checking engine sensor data ( parameters ) is the way to find the problem . What are the fuel trims (short & long term ) at ? Adding or taking away fuel . Are the O2 sensors switching normally ? Do you know the difference between speed density vs mass air flow fuel control ? Do you know how to test these systems , rather then guessing an replacing parts ? Fuel system pressure an
flow testing , ignition system testing etc.....
002 Fuel System Tests Start Here
003 Fuel System Tests Scan Data Tests

Jan 26, 2018 | 1997 Chevrolet C2500

2 Answers

Trouble codes p1131, p1151 and p0171 for 2001 expedition


I don't care how handy you are , that's not going to help you unless you have knowledge of OBD 2 engine management system for your vehicle . Plus having diagnostic test equipment , scan tool to view engine sensor data ., an knowing how to do automotive electrical circuit testing.
Po171 Could be just an O2 sensor problem ,looking at scan data for bank 1 sensor 1 for proper switching , could be a easy find for a trained Tech . You on the other hand could spend hundreds an still not fix the problem .

P0171 - System to Lean (Bank 1) The Adaptive Fuel Strategy continuously monitors fuel delivery hardware. The test fails when the adaptive fuel tables reach a rich calibrated limit. For lean and rich DTCs:
  • Fuel system
  • Excessive fuel pressure.
  • Leaking/contaminated fuel injectors.
  • Leaking fuel pressure regulator.
  • Low fuel pressure or running out of fuel.
  • Vapor recovery system.
  • Induction system:
    • Air leaks after the MAF.
    • Vacuum Leaks.
    • PCV system.
    • Improperly seated engine oil dipstick.
  • EGR system:
    • Leaking gasket.
    • Stuck EGR valve.
    • Leaking diaphragm or EVR.
  • Base Engine:
    • Oil overfill.
    • Cam timing.
    • Cylinder compression.
    • Exhaust leaks before or near the HO2Ss.

P1130 - Lack of HO2S-11 Switch, Fuel Trim at Limit The HEGO Sensor is monitored for switching. The test fails when the HO2S fails to switch due to circuit or fuel at or exceeding a calibrated limit.
  • Electrical:
    • Short to VPWR in harness or HO2S
    • Water in harness connector
    • Open/Shorted HO2S circuit
    • Corrosion or poor mating terminals and wiring
    • Damaged HO2S
    • Damaged PCM
  • Fuel System:
    • Excessive fuel pressure
    • Leaking/contaminated fuel injectors
    • Leaking fuel pressure regulator
    • Low fuel pressure or running out of fuel
    • Vapor recovery system
  • Induction System:
    • Air leaks after the MAF
    • Vacuum Leaks
    • PCV system
    • Improperly seated engine oil dipstick
  • EGR System:
    • Leaking gasket
    • Stuck EGR valve
    • Leaking diaphragm or EVR
  • Base Engine:
    • Oil overfill
    • Cam timing
    • Cylinder compression
    • Exhaust leaks before or near the HO2S(s)
A fuel control HO2S PID switching across 0.45 volt from 0.2 to 0.9 volt indicates a normal switching HO2S. P1131 - Lack of HO2S-11 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean A HEGO sensor indicating lean at the end of a test is trying to correct for an over-rich condition. The test fails when the fuel control system no longer detects switching for a calibrated amount of time. See Possible Causes for DTC P1130
P1151 - Lack of HO2S-21 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean A HEGO sensor indicating lean at the end of a test is trying to correct for an over-rich condition. The test fails when fuel control system no longer detects switching for a calibrated amount of time. See Possible Causes for DTC P1130 006 O2 Sensor Signal Analysis

Oct 01, 2017 | 2000 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Fix engie light code p0442 Evaporative Emission Control, small leak detected


OBD II Code P0442 Evaporative System Malfunction, Small Leak Our emissions expert has put together the following information about the P0442 fault code. We have also included diagnostic procedures you can take to your repair shop if the mechanic is having difficulty analyzing the code.
Related Information Check Engine Light
Emission Gas Definitions

OBD II Fault Code
  • OBD II P0442
Fault Code Definition
  • Evaporative System Malfunction, Small Leak
Symptoms
  • Check Engine Light will illuminate
  • In most cases, there are no adverse conditions noticed by the driver
  • In some cases, there may be a noticeable fuel odor caused by the release of fuel vapors
Common Problems That Trigger the P0442 Code
  • Defective or damaged fuel cap
  • Distorted or damaged Fuel Tank Filler Neck
  • Small tear or puncture in the Evaporative system hose(s) and/or Carbon Canister
  • Defective Fuel Tank Sending Unit gasket or seal
  • Small split in a seam of the Carbon Canister
  • Defective Evaporative Vent Valve and/or Evaporative Purge Valve
  • Defective or damaged Fuel Tank
  • Defective Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor
  • Defective Leak Detection Pump
  • Slightly loose and/or worn clamps or hardened O-rings anywhere in the EVAP system
Common Misdiagnoses
  • Fuel cap
  • Evaporative Purge Valve
  • Evaporative Vent Valve
Basics
The evaporative control (EVAP) system captures any raw fuel evaporating from the fuel storage system (e.g. the fuel tank, filler neck, and fuel cap). Under precise operating conditions-dictated by engine temperature, speed, and load-the EVAP system stores and purges these captured fuel vapors back into the combustion process.
Want to Learn More?
The EVAP system is designed not only to capture, store, and purge any raw fuel vapors that leak from areas in the Fuel Storage system, but also to run a series of self-tests that confirm or deny the operational and vapor holding ability of the system. This is an important task because at least 20 percent of vehicle-produced air pollution originates from malfunctioning Vehicle Fuel Storage systems.
There are many ways to "leak test" the EVAP system, but most perform the leak test when the vehicle is sitting (like over night) or during the initial start-up after the vehicle has been sitting over night. The EVAP system's operational performance is also tracked by the Power Train Computer by reading the change in the oxygen sensor voltages and short term fuel trim whenever the stored vapors are released or "purged" back into the combustion process. These values should indicate that fuel is being added to the system and that the overall mixture is getting richer. The purging process occurs when the vehicle is under acceleration, which is when most vehicles require additional fuel.

P0442 Diagnostic Theory for Shops and Technicians
The P0442 code indicates that there is a small leak in the EVAP system, but this is somewhat misleading. What the code really indicates is that the EVAP system will not hold a specified level of vacuum for a specified amount of time when it performs its leak test.
Here is how the evaporative leak test is performed by the Power Train Computer:
  1. When the leak test is performed, the vehicle must have been sitting for at least four to eight hours so that the engine temperature and outside air temperature are identical. There must also be between 15 and 85 percent fuel in the tank-this is to provide a baseline for the test since gasoline and diesel are volatile fluids that expand and vaporize easily with warm temperatures.
  2. When the leak test initiates, the Vapor Canister Vent Valve is closed to prevent any fresh air from entering the EVAP system. The Purge Valve is also sealed off.
  3. The Leak Detection Pump operates to build a vacuum in the entire Evaporative System (see the Leak Detection Pump information below). After a specified time interval-usually about ten seconds-the Purge Valve is shut off and the vacuum level in the system is measured by the Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor.
  4. Finally, a countdown initiates, which measures the rate at which the vacuum decays in the system. If the vacuum decays faster than the specified rate on two successive tests, then the Power Train Computer will fail the EVAP system and trigger the P0442 code. Most modern EVAP systems will fail the leak test with a pin-sized hole anywhere in the EVAP system, which amounts to 0.020 of an inch or a ½ millimeter.

Nov 26, 2010 | 2003 GMC Envoy

1 Answer

I put a new fuel pump in my 97 concorde, it ran just fine all the way home, but in the morning i wouldnt start. i put another pump in and the same thing happend. could this be a short somewhere?


Well, the fuel pump relay may not be getting electricity to the fuel pump.

Also, use the following procedure to test the fuel pump before changing it again:

TESTING Fig. 1: Connect the fuel pressure gauge C4799B or equivalent to the fuel rail service valve - 3.3L shown 88175g09.gif
Fig. 2: Checking the fuel pressure with a gauge - 3.5L shown 88175g10.gif
Fig. 3: Checking the pressure between the pump and the filter 88175g11.gif
Fig. 4: Place the other end of the adapter 6668 into an approved gasoline container 88175g12.gif
  1. Release the fuel system pressure as described in earlier in this section.
  2. Remove the protective cover from the service valve on the fuel rail.
  3. Connect fuel pressure gauge C-4799B or equivalent to the fuel rail service valve.
  4. Place the ignition key in the ON position. Using the DRB III tester or equivalent, access the ASD fuel system test. (The ASD fuel system test will activate the fuel pump and pressurize the system.)
  5. If the gauge reading equals the specifications, then further testing is not required. Without vacuum applied to the regulator, the 3.3L engine fuel system operates at 55 psi (379 kPa). With the engine idling and the manifold vacuum applied to the regulator, the system operates at approximately 46 psi (317 kPa). Without vacuum applied to the regulator, the 3.5L engine fuel system operates at 48 psi (331 kPa). With the engine idling and the manifold vacuum applied to the regulator, the system operates at approximately 39 psi (269 kPa). The fuel system pressure varies with the different amounts of manifold vacuum applied to the regulator. If the pressure is not correct, record the pressure and remove the gauge.
  6. Ensure that the fuel does not leak from the fuel rail service valve. Install the protective cover onto the fuel rail service valve.
  7. If the fuel pressure reading was below the specifications, test the system according to the following procedure:
    1. Perform the fuel pressure release procedure.
    2. Install a fuel gauge C4799 and fuel adapter 6631 or equivalent in the fuel supply line between the tank and the fuel filter.
    3. Using the DRB III scan tool or equivalent, with the ignition key in the ON position, repeat the ASD fuel system test.
  8. If the pressure is at least 5 psi (1 kPa) or higher than the reading recorded, replace the fuel filter.
  9. If no change is observed, gently squeeze the return hose. If the pressure increases, replace the pressure regulator. If the gauge reading does not change when the return hose is squeezed, the problem is either a plugged inlet strainer or defective fuel pump.
  10. If the fuel pressure reading was above the specifications test the system according to the following procedure:
    1. Perform the pressure release procedure.
    2. Install fuel pressure gauge C4799 and adapter 6631 or equivalent in the fuel supply line between the fuel tank and the fuel filter.
    3. Remove the fuel return line hose from the pump at the tank. Connect pressure test adapter 6668 or equivalent to the return line. Place the other end of adapter 6668 into an approved gasoline container. A minimum of 2 gallon tank should be sufficient. All return fuel will flow into the container.
    4. Using the DRB III scan tool or its equivalent, with the ignition key in the ON position, repeat the ASD fuel system test.
  11. If the pressure is now correct, replace the fuel pump.
  12. If the pressure is still above specifications, remove the fuel return hose from the chassis fuel tubes (at the engine) and attach fuel pressure test adapter 6668 or equivalent to the return tube. Place the other end of the hose in the clean container, repeat the test. If the pressure is now correct, check for a restricted fuel return line. If there is no change observed, replace the fuel pressure regulator.
prev.gif next.gif

Oct 08, 2010 | 1997 Chrysler Concorde

1 Answer

Check engine light is on for emission evaporator failure-large


P0455 - EVAP Control System Leak Detected (No Purge Flow or Large Leak) The PCM monitors the complete EVAP control system for no purge flow, the presence of a large fuel vapor leak or multiple small fuel vapor leaks. The system failure occurs when no purge flow (attributed to fuel vapor blockages or restrictions), a large fuel vapor leak or multiple fuel vapor leaks are detected by the EVAP running loss monitor test with the engine running (but not at idle).
  • After-market EVAP hardware (such as fuel filler cap) non-conforming to required specifications
  • Disconnected or cracked fuel EVAP canister tube, EVAP canister purge outlet tube or EVAP return tube
  • EVAP canister purge valve stuck closed
  • Damaged EVAP canister
  • Damaged or missing fuel filler cap
  • Insufficient fuel filler cap installation
  • Loose fuel vapor hose/tube connections to EVAP system components
  • Blockages or restrictions in fuel vapor hoses/tubes (items also listed under disconnections or cracks)
  • Fuel vapor control valve tube assembly or fuel vapor vent valve assembly blocked
  • Canister vent (CV) solenoid stuck open
  • Mechanically inoperative fuel tank pressure (FTP) sensor
Check for audible vacuum noise or significant fuel odor in the engine compartment or near the EVAP canister and fuel tank. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- HX43 DTC P0457: CHECK FOR MISSING OR LEAKING FUEL FILLER CAP
  • Check for missing fuel filler cap.
  • Check for loose fuel filler cap.
  • Check for possible cross-thread fuel filler cap condition.
Is a fault present concerning the proper installation of the fuel filler cap? Yes No REPLACE cross-threaded or damaged fuel filler cap. RECONNECT and TIGHTEN the fuel filler cap only one eighth turn so that the cap initially clicks by sound or touch. CLEAR Continuous Memory DTCs. COMPLETE an Evaporative Emission Running Loss Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (refer to Section 2 , Drive Cycles). RERUN Quick Test . If DTC P0455 or P0457 is present, Go to HX44 . CLEAR Continuous Memory DTCs. COMPLETE an Evaporative Emission Running Loss Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle (refer to Section 2 , Drive Cycles). RERUN Quick Test .

For DTC P0455 still present: Go to HX44 .

Otherwise, INFORM the vehicle owner that it is important and necessary to immediately install the fuel filler cap after every refueling event. HX44 DTC P0455: VISUAL INSPECTION FOR SUBSTANTIAL EVAPORATIVE EMISSION SYSTEM LEAKS
  • Check for missing fuel filler cap. If the cap is loose DO NOT DISTURB EVAP system.
  • Verify that both the input port vacuum hose and EVAP return tube are attached to the EVAP canister purge valve. Note: If the EVAP canister-CV solenoid assembly is not accessible during this pinpoint test step, GO to Evaporative Emissions, Section 303-13 in the Workshop Manual for removal and installation instructions.
  • Verify that the CV solenoid is properly seated on the EVAP canister (if possible).
  • Visually inspect for disconnected or cracked fuel vapor hoses/tubes between the intake manifold, the EVAP canister purge valve, the EVAP canister, the fuel vapor vent valve assembly and if applicable the fuel vapor control valve tube assembly.
  • Check for damage to the fuel filler pipe and the fuel tank.
Is a fault indicated? Yes No CONNECT or REPLACE fuel vapor hoses/tubes as required. REPLACE damaged EVAP system components (fuel filler pipe, fuel vapor vent valve assembly, fuel vapor control valve tube assembly, EVAP canister purge valve, FTP sensor and EVAP canister-CV solenoid assembly) as necessary. REFER to Evaporative Emissions, Section 303-13 in the Workshop Manual for removal and installation instructions. GO to HX45 . GO to HX45 . HX45 DTC P1443 and P0455: CHECK FOR EVAPORATIVE EMISSION SYSTEM LEAKS
    Note: When checking for leaks or blockages in the EVAP system, energize (close) the canister vent (CV) solenoid through the scan tool for a maximum of nine minutes per pinpoint test step. Then de-energize the CV solenoid prior to performing the subsequent pinpoint test step. This is done to assure proper closing of the solenoid.
  • Disconnect and plug the EVAP return tube (EVAP canister purge valve to intake manifold) at the intake manifold vacuum source.
  • Connect scan tool.
  • Key on, engine off.
  • Access VPWR PID. If the voltage is not 12 volts or greater, GO to HX61 .
  • Locate evaporative test port [marked EVAPORATIVE SERVICE PORT DO NOT USE UNREGULATED PRESSURE ABOVE 6.89 kPa (1 PSI)] near EVAP canister purge valve or EVAP canister.
  • If vehicle is not equipped with the evaporative test port, GO to HX50 .
  • Install the Rotunda Evaporative Emission System Leak Tester 310-F007 (134-00056) or equivalent at the evaporative test port.
  • Close CV solenoid by accessing Output Test Mode on the scan tool.
  • Select ALL OFF mode and push START button.
  • Regulate the nitrogen or argon gas pressure on the tester to 3.48 kPa (14 in-H 2 O).
  • Follow the instructions that come with the EVAP System Leak Tester and pressurize the EVAP system.
  • Perform the EVAP system leak test.
Does the pressure on the EVAP system stay above 1.99 kPa (8 in-H 2 O) and pass the leak test? Yes No GO to HX46 . REMOVE the EVAP System Leak Tester from the evaporative test port and REINSTALL the test port cap. GO to HX50 .

Apr 15, 2009 | 1999 Lincoln Town Car

Not finding what you are looking for?
1998 Ford Taurus Logo

Related Topics:

53 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Ford Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

77499 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22306 Answers

fordexpert

Level 3 Expert

5626 Answers

Are you a Ford Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...