Question about 1996 Oldsmobile LSS

3 Answers

I have a coolant leak on a 3800 motor. The leak is where the metal tube goes in to the back of the water pump. What kind of seal goes on this tube, and does just slide in?

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  • melg175 Sep 20, 2009

    I want you to tell me how to fix it and not autozone. Also it a 1994 and not a 1996.

  • melg175 Sep 20, 2009

    This is a 1994, but I am sure it is the same as a 1996. Anyway, your not understanding what I explained. The leak is where the tube goes in to the back of the water pump. The heater core is way below the water pump, so it's not leaking and running up. There are 2 heater tubes, I goes to the intake, and one goes to the back of the water pump. This is the one leaking.

  • melg175 Sep 20, 2009

    Thank you, I finally found someone who knew what they were talking about. Yes I have at least two 3800's with metal tubes.Can I just slide it out and replace the o ring and slide it back in?

  • melg175 Sep 20, 2009

    Thank you, I finally found someone yho knew what they were talking about. Yes I have 3 0r 4 3800's with metal tubes. Can I just slide it out, replace the o ring , and slide it back in?

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Yes this is A "O" Ring on the tube, and if yours is Metal you Lucked out ,as Most of them are PLASTIC, I have NOT seen A "METAL" Pipe on a 3800

Posted on Sep 20, 2009

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Hi

Thanks for using FixYa. The heater core is probably leaking, and will need replaced. Before tearing into it, though, make sure it isn't one of the heater hoses leaking by the firewall, and just following the copper tube in. Follow this procedure to troubleshoot the coolant leak--

1) DISCONNECT the negative battery terminal

2) Drain any engine coolant that may still be in the car (there is a small drain near the bottom of the radiator). After these two steps, you must gain access to the intake manifold by removing some things that are in your way.

3) Remove the engine cover by turning the oil cap to loosen, then without pulling it off, continue to twist it counterclockwise, when it stops completely, pull the oil cap AND oil cap tube away from the engine. You can then lift the engine cover off of the engine.

3b)Remove the air filter housing. Loosen the two philips screws on the housing itself, then pull the throttle body hose end off. (Peel back the top of the hose, then work around until the whole thing comes loose) Disconnect the plug going into the intake hose, and remove whole assembly from car.

4) If the spark plug wires aren’t marked, mark which one goes where on the coil pack, and pull the three plug wires that run to the rear off of the coil, and let them fall to the rear of the engine bay.

5) Remove serpentine belt.

6) Loosen the three alternator bolts and remove wiring from back of alternator. Remove alternator and set aside. NOTE: To remove one of the bolts, you must remove a bracket which runs from the Alternator to just below the Ignition coils.TIP: There is a bolt which is hard to see just below the belt idler pulley.

7) Remove the 6 Fuel Injector electrical plugs, (Squeeze in on the metal locks and pull up) Remove the three electrical connectors going to the throttle body. Remove the electrical connector going to the MAP sensor (sits on top of the intake manifold near the alternator).

8) Remove all vacuum lines going to the throttle body and intake manifold.

9) Remove the fuel lines from the fuel rail. You will see two plastic lines going the the fuel rail, they are both held in by small plastic clips. To remove them, squeeze in on the bottom of the clips, then pull up on the fuel line. **CAUTION** There may be some residual fuel pressure in one of the lines, so remove the lines very slowly and carefully.

10) Remove Fuel Rail with injectors. There are four nuts which keep the fuel rail, and injectors in place. Once you remove those four 10mm nuts, carefully wiggle and pull upwards on the fuel rail, and the injectors will unseat themselves from the lower intake manifold, and the whole fuel rail will come out. Set aside.

11) Remove Throttle Body. There is a bracket which connects the throttle body to the cylinder head, this little bracket blocks access to one of the throttle body nuts. My trick is to remove the Bracket-to-throttle body bolt, then carefully pry the bracket back until you have enough access to reach the nut with a deep 10mm socket and extension. You can leave the throttle cables attached to the throttle body, and just position the entire assembly aside.At this point, you should have clear access to the entire upper intake manifold.

12) Remove all of the upper intake manifold bolts, and remove the intake from the car. If the intake does not want to separate from the lower, then you most likely missed a bolt. it should NOT require any prying to get it loose.

13)Now if the intake was leaking internally badly, you will likely see an alarmingly large puddle of coolant sitting inside the engine. It is CRUCIAL that you remove all of this coolant, use Paper towels or old rags to soak it all up. Clean the gasket mating surface on the lower intake manifold.TIP: It is very important to have a clean mating surface on the top of the lower intake manifold, or you may encounter leaks.

14) Snap the upper intake gasket into place onto the bottom of the new upper intake manifold and place the upper intake back onto the car, make sure all the bolt holes are aligned.

15) Install and tighten all the bolts in the following sequenceNOTE: The Specified Torque is ONLY 89 INCH pounds,, which is less than 10 ft. pounds.. be very careful not to overtorque and risk cracking the new intake.

16) Reinstall all accessories and wiring, and fuel rail in the reverse order of removal. Refill the coolant system.

17) IMPORTANT STEP: If you saw ANY coolant at all inside the intake manifold upon removal,, you MUST replace the spark plugs. Also it is very important that you remove most of the coolant that may have entered the combustion chambers. Which is simple to do

17a) Remove all six spark plugs, and turn the engine over (pretend you’re starting it) for at least 30 seconds. Install six new spark plugs and you are good to go.

18) Start car and let idle for a while, check for any coolant leaks, carefully watch your temperature gage to make sure no overheating takes place.


Please do accept the solution if the issue is resolved or else revert for further assistance.


Thanks
Rylee

Posted on Sep 20, 2009

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Go to Autozone.com and complete the free registration. You will then be able to access the free repair manuals and it will show you how to repair the leak

Posted on Sep 20, 2009

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visit for more info:

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