Question about 1989 Ford F 150

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No injector pulse

Have replaced the ignition module coil computer and the pick up and stater in the distributor

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You need to see if any fuel is comingt out of the fuel line i it is make sure that it is a steady stream of fuel and if it is not change furel filters.

Posted on Sep 12, 2009

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Pickup coil


Hi sugriva 108,

I saw your comment on one of my other posts;
http://www.fixya.com/cars/t12417950-93_s10_2_8_just_shut_off_woulnt_start?eventid=21761548

yes, if you have battery power at the injector, but when you check for "pulse" from the computer on the ground side of the injector and the test light does not blink, the most common problem is a failed distributor module.
The pick-up coil in the distributor can cause the same symptom. It is the pickup coil that the injector and spark control signals originate from it is connected directly to the distributor module. The module is what sends the signal to the ecm for fuel control and timing advance and also pulses the ignition coil. Some people call the distributor module the "ignition control module". However, it affects fuel as well as ignition, which is why I refer to it as simply the "distributor module".

If the module is bad, you can replace only the distributor module. If the pickup coil is bad, you will either have to disassemble the entire distributor to replace the coil (the hard way) or you can simply buy a remanufactured distributor. It is less expensive to replace only the coil, but the coils usually go bad as a result of worn distributor bushings and it is usually more trouble than it is worth by the time you get everything right.

If you have lots of time to work with me and do some electrical testing, I can help you determine if it is the module or the coil. However, if you just want to get your vehicle running as fast as possible, the easiest and quickest way is to go ahead and get a remanufactured distributor and be done with it. They are not real expensive. AutoZone lists the distributor for your vehicle for under $100 (click link below)
http://www.autozone.com/autozone/parts/Cardone-Reman-Distributor/1993-Chevrolet-S10-P-U-2WD/_/N-izmhuZ93xku?itemIdentifier=765107_0_0_

May 09, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Car would be driving fine then just stop then start again and run, now it was running and stopped and wont start , replaced plugs,cap,rotter,coil but its not getting spark.


Sounds like an ignition module and/or a pickup coil. If there is injector pulse the pickup coil is working.

The ignition module is located on the side of the distibutor. The make a wrench that has both the socket and the torx bit all in one just to install one of these. The wrench should be available from the autoparts store you get the ignition module from. It will make install a lot easier.

Sometimes you have to rotate the distributor a little to get at the two bolts that hold the module to the distributor. Make sure you mark the location of the distributor before you rotate it so that you can but it back in exactly the same place.

Once the two bolts are removed gently push down on the module to disconnect it from the pick-up coil. Sometimes its nice to remove the cap to help line up the new one with the pick-up coil connector and make sure the pick-up coil connector is in tacked. It is not uncommon for them to crumble when replacing the module.

Nov 30, 2010 | 1993 Ford Tempo

1 Answer

My Daughters 1991 astro van with a 4.3 was being driven and it was as if someone turned the key off . Now it turns over but does not fire up . ???? tried different coil..no effect.


Since you replaced the coil I would guess you have no spark?

If your getting fuel and no spark the first thing I would check or replace is the ignition module. It is located in the distributor. If you getting no spark and no fuel (no injector pulse) I would replace the ignition module and the pick-up coil. The pickup coil is the round piece under the rotor in the distributor that plugs into the module. The distributor needs to be removed (mark the base where it is held in place and the position of the rotor before removing so that it can be reinstall din exactly the same position!!) and disassembled in order to replace the pick-up coil.

Nov 11, 2010 | 1991 Chevrolet Astro Extended

1 Answer

1987 cutlass ciera TBI carb -fuel to carb but no fuel injecting into carb-jet module is good-What other problem


If there is fuel to the fuel injectors in the top of the throttle body TBI (Throttle Body Injection) but they do not function, then most likely there is no signal or pulse to the fuel injectors. Check the ECM and the Fuel Injection fuses first.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems or all of them to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Aug 13, 2010 | 1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

1 Answer

I have an 88 Chevy Cheyenne 4.3 V6 with a throttle body. It is acting like gas is not getting into the jets. I checked the fuel filter, fuses, relays, wiring to the jets, and still can't find the...


If the fuel pump does run and there is fuel pressure but there is no fuel injector pulse to the fuel injectors at the top of the throttle body, then the problem is either with the distributor, the ECM, or the wiring between the ignition module inside of the distributor and the ECM.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

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Jul 13, 2010 | Chevrolet C1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 95 gmc will not atart i changed the fuel tank


If you do have fuel pressure, but there is no fuel getting into the cylinders to run the engine, then the engine does not have an injector signal or pulse to open the fuel injectors.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 24, 2010 | 1997 GMC Sierra K2500

2 Answers

Throttle body injectors not fiering but there is fuel pressure


the injectors are fired thru the engine cotrol module but it gets its signal to fire from the pick-up located inside the distributor if you are loosing injector pulse only the ignition module is bad if you are also loosing spark when you loose injector pulse your pick up is causing the problem if you replace the pick-up i recomend you change the ignition module when doing so because they work together and you have to remove the distributor to change the pick-up

May 31, 2009 | 1994 GMC Sierra

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