Question about Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

Solenoid clicks once and starter does not crank. Voltage reading across battery terminals with battery cables connected is only 9.6 volts. With neg cable detached, battery voltage is 12.8. Cleaned terminal, checked starter relay modual, and reattached cables but still get one click from solenoid and starter does not crank

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  • jlehman63 Sep 11, 2009

    I was leaning towards pulling out the starter motor, however, I read the diagnostics it Chilton, which appear to be similar to what you attached to your reply, and found nothing that explains the unusual voltage readings. Battery is 24 months old and is rated 60 months. I gave it a full charge and cleaned terminals when problem occurred this morning. All accessories are off yet I get a 9.6 voltage reading with battery connected to system and 12.8 when cable is disconnect. Would this indicate a short causing the voltage drain? I have repaired numerous starter system problems in my life time but never encountered this voltage anomily.

  • jlehman63 Sep 11, 2009

    I am puzzled by the voltage difference (9.6v with cables connected and 12.6 with neg cable disconnected. Could this indicate a short circuit? I have worked on cars for over 40 years and never experienced this condition when a starter, relay, cable, or solenoid failed.

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  • Jeep Master
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This problem is caused by the large contacts inside the starter solenoid being burnt away that power up the actual starter motor, this is a common problem on all Japanese designed Nippondenso style starters, which just about every car and light truck uses now because they are very light weight, you can order just the starter solenoid, some people have found the contacts for the solenoid on line, ebay motors is a good source, very easy to replace once the starter is removed. If you don't want the hassle of doing the solenoid repair just replace the starter motor with a rebuilt unit, also avil very cheap on ebay, the units are very high quality and 1/2 the price of local parts stores.

Posted on Sep 11, 2009

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  • Jeep Master
  • 17,970 Answers

If the click you here is fair loud and coming from the area of the starter motor then that indicates everything necessary to spin the starter motor is working.

The only question then is whether the battery is strong enough to turn the motor or not, and if it is why doesn't it? I would start by charging the battery or if it is near the end of its warranty then just replace it.

If that doesn't do it, then I believe it is time to rebuild the starter motor. You could also check that the battery cable clamps are tight after you remove and shine up the terminal/clamp interfaces to be sure of good conductivity. Remove the - clamp first, then the + clamp, then replace the + clamp first and finish with the - clamp.

Here is what you do:Starter Feed Circuit Tests

  1. Disable ignition system.
  2. Connect volt/ampere tester to battery terminals. Refer to operating instructions provided with tester being used.
  3. Verify that all lights and accessories are Off and transmission shift selector is in Park for automatic transmissions or Neutral for manual transmissions, then set parking brake.
  4. Rotate and hold ignition switch in Start position. Observe tester.
    • If voltage reads above 9.6 volts and amperage draw reads above 250 amps, proceed to starter feed circuit resistance test.
    • If voltage reads 12.4 volts or greater and amperage reads 0-10 amps, proceed to starter control circuit test.
    • If starter motor turns engine freely at times, but starting system is still suspected, engage starter several times while observing tester. A starting system that has a problem should fail while performing this procedure.
  5. After starting system problem have been corrected, verify battery state of charge, disconnect all testing equipment and connect distributor.
Starter Feed Circuit Resistance Test
The following test will require a voltmeter accurate to 1/10 of a volt.
  1. Disable ignition system.
  2. With all wiring harness and components connected properly, perform the following:
    • Connect positive lead of voltmeter to battery negative post, and negative lead to battery negative cable clamp. Rotate and hold ignition switch in Start position. Observe voltmeter. If voltage is not detected, correct poor contact between cable clamp and post.
    • Connect positive lead of voltmeter to battery positive post, and negative lead to battery cable positive clamp. Rotate and hold ignition switch in Start position. Observe voltmeter. If voltage is not detected, correct poor contact between cable clamp and post.
    • Connect positive lead of voltmeter to battery negative terminal, and negative led to engine block near battery cable attaching point.
  3. Rotate and hold ignition switch in Start position. If voltage reads above .2 volt, correct poor contact at ground cable attaching point. If reading is still above .2 volt, replace ground cable.
  4. Remove starter heat shield (if equipped), then perform the following:
    • Connect positive voltmeter lead to starter motor housing and negative lead to battery negative terminal. Rotate and hold ignition switch in Start position. If voltage reads above .2 volt, correct poor starter to engine ground.
    • Connect positive voltmeter lead to positive battery terminal and negative lead to battery cable terminal on starter solenoid. Rotate and hold ignition switch in Start position. If voltage reads above .2 volt, correct poor contact at battery cable to solenoid connection. If reading is still above .2 volt, replace positive battery cable.
  5. If resistance tests detect no feed circuit failures, replace starter motor.
Starter Solenoid Test
  1. Connect heavy jumper wire on starter relay between battery and solenoid terminals. If engine cranks, perform starter relay test.
  2. If engine does not crank or solenoid chatters, check wiring and connectors from relay to starter for loose or corroded connections.
  3. Repeat test and, if engine still does not crank properly, repair or replace starter as necessary.
Starter Relay Test
  1. Place transmission in Park.
  2. Apply parking brake.
  3. Check for battery voltage between starter relay battery terminal and ground.
  4. Connect jumper wire on starter relay between battery and ignition terminals.
  5. If engine does not crank, connect a second jumper wire to starter relay between ground terminal and good ground and repeat test.
  6. If engine cranks in step 3, transmission linkage is misadjusted or neutral safety switch is defective.
  7. If engine does not crank in step 3, starter relay is defective.
Follow this step by step and you will pinpoint the problem.

I hope help you with this.

Posted on Sep 11, 2009

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I've already replaced the starter, battery, terminal posts, and alternator. It will start of a jump after charging for about ten minutes but will not start when switching the batteries out. It just do


Could be poor battery connections or bad (corroded) cables. Put a voltmeter on the battery: ideal would be over 12.6 volts, if less than 12.2 volts, recharge battery.

If you have a voltmeter, google "voltage drop test" to see how to check for high resistance to current flow. Check the positive battery cable from battery to the starter. It may help you find a poor connection.

Jan 15, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to replace a starter??


Ford Excursion, Expedition, Lincoln Navigator 2000-2005
Starter

Print


Removal & Installation

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.

    Negative battery cable
  2. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    NOTE To disconnect the hard-shell connector from the solenoid S terminal, grasp the plastic shell and pull off; do not pull on the wire. Pull straight off to prevent damage to the connector and S terminal.


    Starter terminal cover Terminal nut and separate the battery starter cable from the starter motor Solenoid S terminal connector, if equipped with a starter mounted solenoid
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Starter motor retaining bolts Starter motor from the vehicle

To install:
  1. Install or connect the following:

    Starter motor and retaining bolts. Tighten the bolts to 15-20 ft. lbs. (20-27 Nm). Bttery starter cable and a terminal nut to the starter motor. Tighten the terminal nuts to 79 inch lbs. (9 Nm). Slenoid S terminal connector, if equipped with a starter mounted solenoid Sarter solenoid safety cap, if equipped
  2. Lower the vehicle.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Ngative battery cable
  4. Start the engine several times to check starter motor operation.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable
  3. Raise the front of the truck and install jackstands beneath the frame. Firmly apply the parking brake and place blocks in back of the rear wheels.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Wiring from the starter motor terminals Starter motor retaining bolts, loosen Starter retaining bolts while supporting the starter motor Starter from the vehicle

To install:
  1. The installation is the reverse of removal. Tighten the starter retaining bolts to 15-20 ft. lbs. (20-27 Nm)

4.6L, 5.4L & 6.8L Engines
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions section.
  2. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  3. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:
    NOTE To disconnect the hard-shell connector from the solenoid S terminal, grasp the plastic shell and pull off; do not pull on the wire. Pull straight off to prevent damage to the connector and S terminal.


    Starter terminal cover Terminal nut and separate the battery starter cable from the starter motor Solenoid S terminal connector, if equipped with a starter mounted solenoid
  5. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Starter motor retaining bolts Starter motor from the vehicle

To install:
  1. Install or connect the following:

    Starter motor and retaining bolts. Tighten the bolts to 15-20 ft. lbs. (20-27 Nm). Battery starter cable and a terminal nut to the starter motor. Tighten the terminal nuts to 79 inch lbs. (9 Nm). Solenoid S terminal connector, if equipped with a starter mounted solenoid Starter solenoid safety cap, if equipped
  2. Lower the vehicle.
  3. Connect the negative battery cable.
  4. Start the engine several times to check starter motor operation.

6.0L Diesel Engine
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions section.
  2. Disconnect the battery ground cable.
  3. Remove starter solenoid protective cap.
  4. Disconnect the starter motor electrical connections.
  5. Remove the bolts and the starter.

To install:
  1. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Tighten the starter bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm)

7.3L Engine
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable
  3. Raise the front of the truck and install jackstands beneath the frame. Firmly apply the parking brake and place blocks in back of the rear wheels.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Wiring from the starter motor terminals Starter motor retaining bolts, loosen Starter retaining bolts while supporting the starter motor Starter from the vehicle

To install:
  1. The installation is the reverse of removal. Tighten the starter retaining bolts to 15-20 ft. lbs. (20-27 Nm)


Testing & Troubleshooting

Feed Circuit Test

  1. Make sure the battery is fully charged.
  2. Disconnect the Inertia Fuel Shutoff (IFS) switch.
  3. Connect a remote starter switch between the starter solenoid S-terminal and the battery positive (+) terminal.
  4. Connect the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter positive lead to the battery positive (+) post. Connect negative lead to the starter solenoid M-terminal.

    0996b43f80204e8b.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Motor feed circuit-S-terminal (1), remote starter switch (2), battery (3), Rotunda 73 digital multimeter (4), B-terminal (5), M-terminal (6)

  5. Engage the remote starter switch. Read and record the voltage. The voltage reading should be 0.5 volt or less.
  6. If the voltage reading is 0.5 volt or less, go to the Motor Ground Circuit Component Test.
  7. If the voltage reading is greater than 0.5 volt, indicating excessive resistance, move the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter negative lead to the starter solenoid B-terminal and repeat the test. If the voltage reading at the B-terminal is lower than 0.5 volt, the concern is either in the connections at the starter solenoid or in the solenoid contacts.
  8. Remove the cables from solenoid B-, S- and M-terminals. Clean the cables and connections and reinstall the cables to the correct terminals. Repeat Steps 3 through 6. If the voltage drop reading is still greater than 0.5 volt when checked at the M-terminal or less than 0.5 volt when checked at the B-terminal, the concern is in the solenoid contacts. Install a new starter motor.
  9. If the voltage reading taken at the solenoid B-terminal is still greater than 0.5 volt after cleaning the cables and connections at the solenoid, the concern is either in the positive (+) battery cable connection or in the positive battery cable itself.
  10. By moving the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter negative lead toward the battery and checking each mechanical connection point, the excessive voltage drop can be located. When the high reading disappears, the last mechanical point that was checked is the concern. Repair or install a new connection as required.

Ground Circuit Test
A slow cranking condition can be caused by resistance in the ground or return portion of the cranking circuit. Check the voltage drop in the ground circuit as follows:
  1. Disconnect the inertia fuel shutoff switch.
  2. Connect a remote starter switch between the starter solenoid S-terminal and the battery positive (+) terminal.
  3. Connect the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter positive lead to the starter motor housing (the connection must be clean and free of rust or grease). Connect the negative lead to the negative (-) battery terminal.

    0996b43f80204e8c.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Motor ground circuit-Rotunda 73 digital multimeter (1), battery (2), S-terminal (3), M-terminal (4), B-terminal (5), remote starter switch (6)

  4. Engage the remote starter switch and crank the engine. Read and record the voltage reading. The reading should be 0.2 volt or less.
  5. If the voltage drop is more than 0.2 volt, clean the negative cable connections at the battery and body connections, and retest.
  6. If the voltage drop is greater than 0.2 volt, determine which way the current is flowing in the cable.
  7. Connect the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter positive lead to the end of the cable nearest battery positive.
  8. Connect the multimeter negative lead to the terminal at the other end of the cable.
  9. Crank the engine and observe the voltage reading. The voltage reading should be 0.2 volt or lower. If the voltage drop is too high, clean the terminal ends. Retest, and if still high, install a new cable. If the voltage reading is less than 0.2 volt and the engine still cranks slowly, install a new starter motor.

Voltage Drop Test

WARNING When servicing the starter motor or performing other underhood work in the vicinity of the starter motor, be aware that the heavy gauge battery input lead at the starter solenoid is "electrically hot" at all times.

WARNING A protective cap or boot is provided over the battery input terminal on all vehicle lines and must be installed after servicing. Be sure to disconnect the battery ground cable before servicing the starter motor.
Always make the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter connections at the component terminal rather than at the wiring end connector. Making a connection at the wiring end connector could result in false readings because the meter will not pick up a high resistance between the wiring connector and the component.

Aug 05, 2012 | 2001 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Hi, my BMW 318E46 won't start, it just clicks twice. We're getting over 12V from the battery and lights, radio etc so don't think its that. Maybe the solenoid switch, any other ideas? We want to check the...


This is typical of two more common problems; a weak battery (12 volts when not cranking the engine isn't enough) or corroded battery clamps or terminals. Probably #3 is a corroded starter or solenoid terminal.
While cranking, the starter draws from ~120-200 amperes of current and any even mildly corroded connection in the path will drop all of the voltage. 0.1 Ohms of resistance will drop nearly all of 12 volts when trying to start.
Check voltage across the battery terminals (not the clamps) while cranking, not without a good load drawing current. If you have less than 10 volts, most cars will not crank but only cause the solenoid to chatter (=clicks).
If you disconnect the battery for any reason, disconnect the negative (ground) cable FIRST to avoid accidentally contacting the positive terminal and ground with a tool which may melt and/or damage the battery.

Jan 18, 2011 | 1999 BMW 318 ti

3 Answers

MY 2001 grand caravan wont start , it only stars once in a while i think it might be the starter


before you assume that the starter motor is to blame make sure it is not the battery or connection / cables on the battery. Also, check the starter solenoid.

Feb 26, 2010 | 2001 Dodge Grand Caravan

3 Answers

The car just clicks when turning on. I changed the starter and it is still doing the same thing


need to check for clean and tight cables both at the starter and the battery, and have your battery tested

Nov 17, 2009 | 1996 Chevrolet Cavalier

2 Answers

My 1997 jeep grand cherokee tsi with a 5.2 seems to have a charging problem. the alternator is a year old and was tested twice in the last week at 2 different locations and was shown to be good. same thing...


How is the pigtail ground strap from engine block to body? Have you had engine diagnostic test done? Voltage rVOLTAGE DROP TEST
A voltage drop test is the only effective way to find excessive resistance in high amperage circuits. It's a quick and easy test that doesn't require any disassembly and will quickly show you whether or not you've got a good connection or a bad one.
To do a voltage drop test, you create a load in the circuit that's being tested. Then you use a digital volt meter (DVM) to measure the voltage drop across the live connection while it is under the load. Voltage always follows the path of least resistance, so if the circuit or connection being tested has too much resistance some of the voltage will flow through the DVM and create a voltage reading.
voltage_drop.jpg

If a connection is good, you should find little or no voltage drop and see less than 0.4 volts for most connections, and ideally less than 0.1 volts. But if you find more than a few tenths of a voltage drop across a connection, it indicates excessive resistance and a need for cleaning or repair.
CHECKING THE STARTER CIRCUIT
To check the starter circuit for excessive resistance, you need to measure the voltage drop at the battery, battery cable connections and starter while the engine is being cranked.
The first check is "available battery voltage." For the starter to crank at normal speed, the battery must be at least 75% charged (12.4 volts or higher). Low battery voltage can not only affect the starter but every other electrical system in the vehicle.
A. Set your DVM to the 20 volt scale, then connect meter positive (+) lead to battery positive (+) post (not the clamp or cable), and the meter negative (-) lead to battery negative (-) post.
B. Disable the engine so it will not start when it is cranked. (Ground the ignition coil wire, or disable the ignition circuit or fuel pump relay.) Limit cranking time to 15 seconds or less.
C. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading on the DVM. D. Next, connect your meter positive (+) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter, and the meter negative (-) lead to the starter housing.
E. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading.
F. Compare the two voltage readings. If both are the same, there are no excessive voltage drops on the positive feed side.
G. If available voltage at the starter is not within one (1) volt of battery voltage, there is excessive voltage drop in the circuit.
The next test is for voltage drop on the positive side of the starter circuit.
A. Make sure the battery is fully charged.
B. Disable ignition.
C. Set DVM on 2 volt scale.
D. Connect meter positive (+) lead to positive (+) battery post, and the meter negative (-) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter. While cranking the engine, record the voltage reading.
The maximum allowable voltage drop including the solenoid or external relay in the starter circuit should be 0.6 volts or less.
If you find more than a 0.6 volt drop in the starter circuit, you can isolate the bad connection by using the following voltage drop tests.
* Check the positive battery post and cable connection by measuring the voltage drop between the two while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the battery post and the meter negative lead to the cable clamp. A good post/cable connection should have zero voltage drop.
* Check the positive battery cable by measuring the voltage drop end to end while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the clamp on the positive battery cable, and the meter negative lead to the end of the cable at the starter. Crank the engine and note the voltage reading. A good cable should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
* To check the starter solenoid or relay connections, connect the meter positive lead to positive battery terminal on the solenoid or relay, and the meter negative lead to the starter motor terminal. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
Next, you need to check the negative side of the starter circuit. To check the entire circuit, connect the meter positive lead to a clean spot on the starter motor case and the meter negative lead to the negative battery post. Crank the engine and note the reading. The voltage drop on the negative side should be 0.3 volts or less.
If the voltage drop is too high, set your DVM to the 2 volt scale and start checking each connection on the negative side to find the bad connection or cable. Use the DVM leads to check across each connection while cranking the engine as before.
Check the negative battery post/ground cable connection (should be zero voltage drop).
Check the negative ground cable from the battery to the engine (should be 0.2 volts or less).
Check between the negative battery post and starter housing (should be 0.3 volts or less).
Check between the engine block and starter housing (should be 0.10 volts or less).
CHECKING THE CHARGING CIRCUIT
To check the alternator connections on the positive side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect the meter positive lead to the alternator output stud (B+ terminal).
C. Connect the meter negative lead to the positive (+) battery post.
D. With the engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except the rear electric defroster), check the voltage drop reading. It should be 0.5 volts or less. If higher, the connections between the alternator output stud and battery need to be cleaned. Also, look for loose connections or undersized cables.
To check the alternator connections on the negative side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect meter negative lead to alternator case.
C. Connect meter positive lead to battery negative (-) post.
D. With engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except rear defogger), check the voltage drop reading. On the negative side, it should be 0.2 volts or less. If excessive, the connections need cleaning or the negative cable needs to be replaced. Some alternators are mounted in rubber bushings and have a separate ground strap. If so equipped, be sure to check the voltage drop across this strap, too.

egulator checked with voltmeter?

Nov 15, 2009 | 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

Truck won't start when ignition is turned it makes a clicking sound, no fuel pump sound, battery is fine.


Three possible problems - solenoid, starter or cable. I'm not sure what engine you have. I just replaced starter in mustang with 5.0L engine. If you have solenoid mounted on side of engine compartment; turn ignition to run position and put a screwdriver across the two large terminals (make sure you don't touch the side of the engine compartment). If starter cranks over then you might have a bad solenoid. If starter doesn't crank over then you may have a bad starter.
If you have a meter; see if you have voltage on terminals of solenoid. One side of the large terminals will have voltage on it with ignition turned off. If not then you have bad cable or poor connection between battery and solenoid. Pull cable off and clean terminal. Get someone to turn the ignition switch to the start position to see if you have voltage on the other large terminal. If you do then your solenoid is probably good. The next place to check is the starter; if you can get to it. Get someone to turn the ignition switch to see if you have voltage. If you have voltage then your starter may be bad and if you don't then you may have a bad cable or bad connection on terminal. If you replace starter make sure the mating surface is clean before you put new one on to ensure a good ground. Hope this helps. Good Luck.

Jun 18, 2009 | 1991 Ford F250

10 Answers

2001 honda civic ex


if its a standard check the clutch pedal switch if its an auto check the neutral safety switch and check the fuse in the fusebox that says CRANK

Nov 12, 2008 | 2001 Honda Civic

1 Answer

Voltage drop test


First, check battery post to cable connection: positive meter lead on battery positive post, negaitve lead on battery's positive cable clamp. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have zero voltage drop. Second, check the positive cable: positve meter lead on positive battery clamp, negative lead on starter terminal connector. A good cable will show a voltage drop of .2 volts or less while cranking. Third, check the starter connection: positive meter lead on positive battery terminal on the solenoid, negative meter lead on actual starter stud. A good connection will have a voltage drop of near zero volts. Now to check the negative side of the circuit. Total drop on the ground side should be .3 volts or less and can be checked by placing positive meter lead on starter housing and negative meter lead on battery ground post. Take your reading while cranking the engine, and be sure your connection at the starter is solid and clean. If total voltage drop on this side of the circuit is excessive, complete testing at all connections in the same fashion as the positive side of the circuit. Check the following: between battery post and clamp (zero voltage drop), cable end at battery to cable end at engine. (.2 volts or less), cable end at engine to engine itself (near zero voltage drop), and finally between starter housing and engine block (.1 volts or less).

To read the entire procedure for all automotive systems read this artile:
http://www.engine-light-help.com/voltage-drop.html

Aug 31, 2008 | 1997 Chevrolet Blazer

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