Question about Volvo S70

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Just removed cylinder head from my 2.4 s70 all the valves look like they were rubbing on the pistons is it possible that the timing was off

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  • Master
  • 986 Answers

Yes, your belt has sliped,and you probly have some bent valves

Posted on Sep 10, 2009

  • 2 more comments 
  • Donnie Wilson
    Donnie Wilson Sep 11, 2009

    What did you want me to tell you everything is ok

  • Donnie Wilson
    Donnie Wilson Sep 11, 2009

    how many miles did you have,You should have changed you belt at 50.000 miles,you cant drive them to death and expext us to fix you on a e mail

  • Donnie Wilson
    Donnie Wilson Sep 11, 2009

    looks like bad mainteance practice

  • Donnie Wilson
    Donnie Wilson Sep 11, 2009

    They should let us grade you by your questions????????????

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4 Answers

Trying to replace broken timing belt. Trying to set #1 cyl. to TDC manually. no compression reading on 1 &4, readings on 2 & 3. What could cause this?? HELP!!


Hole in the piston crown is the worst Charles, but let's not be pessimistic :>(

More likely valves open. At TDC firing stroke both inlet and exhaust valves should be closed. The flat, low part of the cam should be on the followers. So 1 and 4 have valves open, 2 and 3 are closed. If you turn the cam 180 degrees, you should have compression on 1 and 4 and no compression on 2 and 3.

The other thing though, is that when the timing belt breaks, the valves are often in the wrong place at the wrong time and can often meet the piston head on. This can bend the valves. or damage the piston. The normal advice is to remove the cylinder head to check, and then service the valves whilst you have it apart.

A job like this, you need a workshop manual.

May 18, 2016 | 1999 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

Compression cylinder low #2 and #3 cylinders.


there are only four possibilities left:
1: valves are not fully seating - adjust rocker arm / cam
2: piston rings are bad - replace rings
3: holes in pistons - replace
4: cylinders out of round - most complicated repair, bore / machine cylinders and replace piston rings with oversized rings.

of course you could just have 'gunk' on the valves preventing full closure........

Jul 23, 2014 | 2001 Hyundai Tiburon

1 Answer

What to do when there no psi on cyl 4 to get the psi up agan"?"


There are at least three possible reasons for no psi in cyl No 4.
1. Burnt or damaged exhaust valve in that cylinder
FIX Remove head and replace faulty valve
2. Blown head gasket (water mixed with sump oil shows milky on dipstick and steam or water coming out of exhaust tailpipe, radiator water disappears )
FIX Remove head, grind flat and assemble with new gasket.
3. Broken piston rings, or cracked piston or burnt hole in piston.
FIX replace faulty parts.
Squirt some sump oil ( 2 or 3 spoonfuls ) through spark plug hole,
spin motor , and if compression PSI improves then it is rings or piston, if no PSI then it is faulty ex valve !!!

Jun 26, 2014 | 2003 Mitsubishi Lancer

1 Answer

Why is there no compression in engine on my 1991 mitsubishi pajerno


This has to be because of a mechanical problem in the engine. Possible sources are the timing belt is broken (one indication is the starter spins the engine faster than normal, because the camshaft that opens and closes valves is not turning with the crankshaft), or the head gasket has failed (from overheating as the most likely cause), or badly worn piston rings and/or valves not sealing well (common on high mileage engines).
Compression is built up in the upper part of the cylinder where combustion occurs, so leaks or lost compression are due to valves not sealing, or head gasket that seals the cylinder head to the engine block-sometimes the aluminum cylinder head can warp due to overheating, and the head gasket no longer can maintain a seal. Or also the piston rings are worn so bad that compression will leak past them into the crankcase. For valves or head gasket, the cylinder head has to be removed and repaired. For the rings, the engine has to be rebuilt entirely.
First check if the timing belt is still intact.
.

Apr 02, 2014 | 2002 Mitsubishi Galant

1 Answer

There is a tapping noise in the motor but its not knocking I think its a lifter it hasent lost any power and its really not getting worse I would like to know what the spec is for tighing down the lifter...


Depends on which engine you have. If you have


ADJUSTMENT Although it is sometimes possible to reuse an old cylinder head cover gasket, in most cases it makes more sense to purchase a new one before beginning the procedure. Some vehicles may require the use of silicone sealant either with or without a new cover gasket. For more details, please refer to the cylinder head cover procedures in Engine & Engine Overhaul of this repair guide and refer to the gasket manufacturer's instructions.

Z24i Engine
See Figures 1, 2 and 3
For the intake valves: 1-4-5-8 valve clearance is 0.012 in. (0.30mm). For the exhaust valves: 2-3-6-7 valve clearance is 0.012 in. (0.30mm). The pivot locknut torque specification is 12-16 ft. lbs. (16-22 Nm).

  1. The valves must be adjusted with the engine warm, so start the truck and run the engine until the needle on the temperature gauge reaches the middle setting. After the engine is warm, shut it off.
  2. Note the location of any wires and hoses which may interfere with cylinder head cover removal, disconnect them and move them to one side. Remove the bolts holding the cylinder head cover in place and remove the cover. Remember, the engine will be hot, so be careful!

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Fig. Fig. 1: Check the valve clearance with a flat feeler gauge-Z24i engine





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Fig. Fig. 2: Loosen the locknut and turn the adjusting screw to adjust the valve clearance-Z24i engine


1c1d35c.gif


Fig. Fig. 3: With the No. 1 piston at TDC, adjust the top set of valves FIRST; with the No. 4 piston at TDC, adjust the bottom set of valves SECOND-Z24i engine

  1. Rotate the crankshaft until the timing marks indicate that the No. 1 piston is at TDC of the compression stroke. If you're not sure of which stroke you're on, remove the No. 1 spark plug and hold your thumb over the hole. Pressure will be felt as the piston starts up on the compression stroke.
  2. Refer to the accompanying illustration (upper part), then check valves (1), (2), (4) and (6) using a flat bladed feeler gauge. The feeler gauge should pass between the valve stem end and the rocker arm screw with a very slight drag. Insert the feeler gauge straight, not at an angle.
  3. If the clearance is not within the specified value, loosen the rocker arm lock nut and turn the rocker arm screw to obtain the proper clearance. After correct clearance is obtained, tighten the locknut.
  4. Rotate the crankshaft until the timing marks indicate that the No. 4 piston is at TDC of the compression stroke. If you're not sure of which stroke you're on, remove the No. 4 spark plug and hold your thumb over the hole. Pressure will be felt as the piston starts up on the compression stroke.
  5. See the illustration (lower part), then check valves (3), (5), (7) and (8). Check and adjust valve clearance as necessary.
  6. Install the cylinder head cover gasket, the cover itself and any wires or hoses which were removed. Check the engine oil level.

KA24E, VG30i and VG30E Engines
See Figures 4 and 5
These models utilize hydraulic valve lifters. Periodic adjustment is neither necessary or possible. There is however a bleed down procedure that is necessary when the valve train has been disassembled.
HYDRAULIC LIFTER BLEED DOWN
  1. Remove the cylinder head cover.
  2. Check the lifters for proper operation by pushing hard on each lifter with fingertip pressure.
  3. If the valve lifter moves more than 0.04 in. (1mm), air may be inside it. Make sure the rocker arm is not on the cam lobe when making this check.
  4. Install the cylinder head cover.
  5. If there was air in the lifters, bleed the air by running the engine at 1000 rpm for 10 minutes.


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Fig. Fig. 4: Cross-sectional view of an installed hydraulic valve lifter-4 cylinder engine


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Fig. Fig. 5: Cross-sectional view of an installed hydraulic valve lifter-6 cylinder engine

Oct 29, 2010 | 1989 Nissan Hardbody King

1 Answer

#2 cylinde r head bad. how to repair low compression


First thing you need to do is determine why the compression in that cylinder is low. Four possible causes are 1. blown head gasket 2.bad valve(s) in the head 3. broken compression ring, piston ring land or burned piston. 4. rounded camshaft lobes
One other possibility is a fuel washed cylinder (from leaking injector)
You are going to have to remove that cylinder head and do a thorough internal inspection, possibly involving oil pan and piston removal.
Once the cause has been found you can proceed to make an appropriate repair. Or if the damage is beyond your ability, replace the engine with a used or new one.
There is no quick easy fix to restore compression.

Jun 09, 2010 | 2005 Chevrolet Colorado

1 Answer

The engine will not turn off by removing the key


FOR ENGINE THAT DIESELING POSSIBLE CAUSES IDLE SPEED TOO HIGH.IGNITION TIMING OFF AND EXCESSIVE CARBON DEPOSITS ON VALVES AND PISTONS.YOU CAN GO TO AUTO ZONE BUY A CAN OF ENGINE CARBON REMOVER YOU ADD TO GAS BUT IF CARBON BUILT TOO THICK ON VALVES HEADS AND PISTONS.THE CYLINDER HEADS WILL HAVE TO BE REMOVED.TO CLEAN OFF CARBON.

May 17, 2010 | 2001 Plymouth Neon

2 Answers

98 volvo S70: Won't start


it is either out of time or you have bent valves

Apr 14, 2010 | 1998 Volvo S70

1 Answer

I have a V reg S70 volvo. The cam belt has snapped and I was also told by the mechanic that the cylinders have seized up. Any suggestions as to what i should do. Thanks Richard


Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but the enginies are interferance engines. That means when the timing belt breaks the valves and the pistons hit each other. Usually only the cylinder head will need to be replaced/repaired, but if the engine seized up then the engine will have to be replaced.

Feb 20, 2009 | 1998 Volvo S70

4 Answers

No compression in one cylinder


Timing belt slipped around cam pulley. Take off your timing belt cover and check the position. This would explain misfiring and compression loss. Stretched belt or missing cogs in belt likely culprit.

Dec 08, 2008 | 1996 Ford Escort 4 Door

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