Question about 2000 Dodge Durango

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Voltage meter was pegged to the high side.

Just replaced the alternator and the battery was tested. Still won't start. Now when the battery is connected there is a ticking sound even with the key out of the ignition.

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1996 lerado grand cheroke jeep, battery gauge went to to negative, no power new won;t stay running new battery, alternator checks out good any ideas


First check your battery get a cheap digital volt meter. Free at Harbor freight with a purchase. Fully charged battery 12.6 volts Not 12.5 or 4 or 3. With the volt meter set on DC volts touch the battery and have someone start the car if the meter shows high 13.5 to 14.7 the alternator is ok if it is less replace. If you have a dead short take out every fuse and relay from the black box under hood by the battery. Remember where they go and plug them one at a time until the discharge hits and at least you will know what circuit it is.They also sell about 20 dollars a plastic meter you hold over the positive battery cable to see if the starter is drawing to much power A battery open-circuit voltage test will show the approximate state-of-charge of a battery. This test can be used if no other battery tester is available.

Before proceeding with this test, completely charge the battery. Refer to Standard Procedures for the proper battery charging procedures.
  1. Before measuring the open-circuit voltage, the surface charge must be removed from the battery. Turn on the headlamps for fifteen seconds , then allow up to five minutes for the battery voltage to stabilize.
  2. Disconnect and isolate both battery cables, negative cable first.

118345962 Testing Open Circuit Voltage

  1. Using a voltmeter connected to the battery posts (see the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the voltmeter), measure the open-circuit voltage.

118345963
See the Open-Circuit Voltage Table. This voltage reading will indicate the battery state-of-charge, but will not reveal its cranking capacity. If a battery has an open-circuit voltage reading of 12.4 volts or greater , it may be tested to reveal its cranking capacity. Refer to Standard Procedures for the proper Micro 420 battery test procedures.


s than 13.5 alternator is bad

Dec 12, 2011 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

The battery has tested fine, the alternator is fine. But it won't start or hold a charge.


REPLACE POSITIVE BATTERY CABLE.CHECK ALTERNATOR FUSE AND CHECK ALTERNATOR VOLTAGE REGULATOR WIRES FOR DAMAGE.HOOK VOLT METER TO BATTERY FEED WIRE MAKE SURE 12 VOLTS GETTING TO ALTERNATOR FEED WIRE TO ALTERNATOR POSITIVE HOOK UP IF NOT YOU HAVE BLOWED FUSE TO WIRE FEEDING ALTERNATOR COULD HAVE FAULTY BATTERY POSITIVE CABLE OR CABLES CORRODED NEED CLEANING.

Aug 27, 2011 | 2005 Ford Ranger

2 Answers

Battery won't hold a charge


There seems to be a no charge state in this case. I recommend checking the battery first, then, move on to the charging system. Use the procedure below to isolate this issue.

Wear protective eye wear and clothing and remove all jewelry when checking your battery and charging system. Jewelry is a good conductor of electricity and is not recommended. Most batteries wear out every 3 to 5 years and need to be replaced. Always replace your battery with an equal replacement battery to assure proper operation. Automotive batteries have a positive terminal (red), negative terminal (black). Electricity is stored in the battery and then supplied to the vehicle when the engine is not running. While the engine is running the vehicles alternator charges the battery for future use. (Note: never disconnect the battery while the engine is running). To check a battery surface voltage, remove the positive terminal protective cover. Connect the positive side meter lead (red) to the positive side battery terminal. Connect the negative (black) side meter lead to the negative battery terminal. With the vehicle not running and the car sitting over night the battery voltage should be between 12.5 and 12.8 volts.(You will need to use a voltmeter for this testing procedure). If the voltage is not up to specs, replace the battery asap. If the battery is ok and showing good voltage readings; Move on to the alternator/generator drive belt and amperage test.

The alternator is rotated by a drive belt, which is, driven by the vehicles engine crank shaft pulley while it is running. Electrical voltage and amperage are generated to recharge the battery and supply voltage to the electrical system of the car. The alternator is held in place with mounting bolts. There is a main electrical wire on the rear of the alternator that supplies voltage to a main voltage junction box. If your alternator is not charging properly, your battery will slowly drain down from operating all the electrical systems in your car and stop the car from running. Most non charge states will be the cause of a loose belt or a low tension rate, due to a mis-adjusted alternator. Make sure you have enough tension in the belt for full rotation of the alternator pulley.

Next, you will need to check the alternators output with the Amp meter.

Testing the amperage output of an alternator is good for measuring the amount (not the level) of voltage the alternator can produce. This test can be tricky because if the alternator is weak it can still show it as producing amperage(False reading); Which is good, but if the voltage is low, it will still allow the battery to go dead. To check the amperage output of an alternator an amp meter will be required. Once the meter is connected start the engine. Next; Turn on all electrical accessories and raise the engine idle to about 1300 RPM. The alternator should produce the max amperage it was designed to produce. Example: a 90 amp alternator should produce about 88 amps. An alternator cannot sustain maximum output for long periods of time. If the alternator is forced to operate at maximum output it will overheat and fail(due to a failed regulator). An alternator is designed to operate at max amperage output only for a reasonable amount of time. Once you have verified the amp readings, check the voltage. To check the voltage, Connect the voltage meter lead the same way you would in a battery static voltage check, Start engine (do not drive). At engine idle, the voltage should be between 13.6 to 14.3 volts. If not the alternator may need replacing.


  • NOTE_ Be sure to inspect the battery terminals for connectivity issues such as corrosion and so fourth..

Nov 21, 2010 | 2003 GMC Sierra 1500

1 Answer

I have alternator charging battery problems on my 1991 Chrysler Lebaron LX 3.0 Liter V6 Convertible. Any ideas?


hello there:
you're problem may be in the alternator or the battery to find out you will need a volt meter and have the vehicle running to test the alternator set you volt meter to dc voltage and touch the positive side with the red lead and the negative side with the black lead you should show 14 to 14.5 volts if not replace the alternator then with car off using the volt meter and test the battery the same way you should get 12 to 13 volts then wit the volt meter still hooked up to the battery with the help from someone try to start the car and see if the voltage drops below 10 volts if so the battery might be shot....hope this is helpful best regards D.Jones p.s please leave a review thanks

May 30, 2010 | 1991 Chrysler LeBaron

1 Answer

I have a 1994 laredo grand v8 new battery, new battery conections, new alternator. battery tests @ 12.8 , alternator tests low @ 12.5 and when the car is started w/ lights and heater on high the meter goes...


Have the alternator tested,remove it,and take it to the auto parts store,if it test good,replace the computer,the voltage regulator is in the computer.

Apr 06, 2010 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Starter, battery, or alter Promblems.


There seems to be a no charge state in this case. I recommend checking the charging system. use the procedure below to isolate this issue.

Wear protective eye wear and clothing and remove all jewelry when checking your battery and charging system. Jewelry is a good conductor of electricity and is not recommended. Most batteries wear out every 3 to 5 years and need to be replaced. Always replace your battery with an equal replacement battery to assure proper operation. Automotive batteries have a +positive terminal (red), - negative terminal (black). Electricity is stored in the battery and then supplied to the vehicle when the engine is not running. While the engine is running the vehicles alternator charges the battery for future use. (Note: never disconnect the battery while the engine is running. If the battery cable is disconnected from the battery a spark can be generated which can cause the battery to explode or a major electrical malfunction to occur.)

To check a battery surface voltage, remove the positive terminal protective cover. Connect the +positive side meter lead (red) to the positive side battery terminal. Connect the - negative (black) side meter lead to the negative battery terminal. With the vehicle not running and the car sitting over night the battery voltage should be between 12.5 and 12.8 volts.(You will need to use a voltmeter for this testing procedure)

The alternator is rotated by a drive belt driven by the vehicles engine while it is running. Electrical voltage and amperage are generated to recharge the battery and supply voltage to the electrical system of the car. The alternator is held in place with mounting bolts. There is a main electrical wire on the rear of the alternator that supplies voltage to a main voltage junction box. If your alternator is not charging properly, your battery will slowly drain down from operating all the electrical systems in your car and stop the car from running.(most non charge states will be the cause of a loose belt or a low tension rate, due to a mis-adjusted alternator. make sure you have enough tension in the belt for full rotation of the alt pulley)

Next, you will need to check the alternators output with the Amp meter.

Testing the amperage output of the alternator is good for measuring the amount (not the level) of voltage the alternator can produce. This test can be tricky because if the alternator is weak it can still show it as producing amperage. Which is good, but if the voltage is low, it will still allow the battery to go dead. To check the amperage output of an alternator an amp meter is needed. Once the meter is connected start the engine. Next turn on all electrical accessories and raise the engine idle to about 1200 RPM. The alternator should output the max amperage it was designed to produce. Example: a 90 amp alternator should output about 88 amps. Note: An alternator cannot sustain maximum output for long periods of time. If the alternator is forced to operate at maximum output it will overheat and fail. An alternator is designed to operate at max amperage output only for a reasonable amount of time.

((Connect the voltage meter lead the same way you would in a battery static voltage check, Start engine (do not drive) at engine idle the voltage should be between 13.6 to 14.3 volts. If not the alternator may need replacing.)))


Additionally, If the above inspections prove that the charging system, and battery are ok, This will lead to a battery drain issue.

Here is a procedure I use to isolate a battery drain. Remove the negative battery cable from the battery. Using a 12-volt test light, hook one end to the negative battery post the other end to the negative battery cable you just disconnected. The test light will glow or "light" if there is a drain. If the "light or glow" is faint, that is probably normal draw for the clock or computer. If the "light or glow" is bright, this will indicate a large drain is present. That should be corrected,asap. Now start removing and replacing the fuses one by one until the light goes out; The one fuse that causes the light to shut off, will be the circuit with the drain. Remember to close the car doors, when testing. If not, the interior doom light will interfere with the results of the test.

Dec 15, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Wrangler

2 Answers

My 1997 jeep grand cherokee tsi with a 5.2 seems to have a charging problem. the alternator is a year old and was tested twice in the last week at 2 different locations and was shown to be good. same thing...


How is the pigtail ground strap from engine block to body? Have you had engine diagnostic test done? Voltage rVOLTAGE DROP TEST
A voltage drop test is the only effective way to find excessive resistance in high amperage circuits. It's a quick and easy test that doesn't require any disassembly and will quickly show you whether or not you've got a good connection or a bad one.
To do a voltage drop test, you create a load in the circuit that's being tested. Then you use a digital volt meter (DVM) to measure the voltage drop across the live connection while it is under the load. Voltage always follows the path of least resistance, so if the circuit or connection being tested has too much resistance some of the voltage will flow through the DVM and create a voltage reading.
voltage_drop.jpg

If a connection is good, you should find little or no voltage drop and see less than 0.4 volts for most connections, and ideally less than 0.1 volts. But if you find more than a few tenths of a voltage drop across a connection, it indicates excessive resistance and a need for cleaning or repair.
CHECKING THE STARTER CIRCUIT
To check the starter circuit for excessive resistance, you need to measure the voltage drop at the battery, battery cable connections and starter while the engine is being cranked.
The first check is "available battery voltage." For the starter to crank at normal speed, the battery must be at least 75% charged (12.4 volts or higher). Low battery voltage can not only affect the starter but every other electrical system in the vehicle.
A. Set your DVM to the 20 volt scale, then connect meter positive (+) lead to battery positive (+) post (not the clamp or cable), and the meter negative (-) lead to battery negative (-) post.
B. Disable the engine so it will not start when it is cranked. (Ground the ignition coil wire, or disable the ignition circuit or fuel pump relay.) Limit cranking time to 15 seconds or less.
C. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading on the DVM. D. Next, connect your meter positive (+) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter, and the meter negative (-) lead to the starter housing.
E. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading.
F. Compare the two voltage readings. If both are the same, there are no excessive voltage drops on the positive feed side.
G. If available voltage at the starter is not within one (1) volt of battery voltage, there is excessive voltage drop in the circuit.
The next test is for voltage drop on the positive side of the starter circuit.
A. Make sure the battery is fully charged.
B. Disable ignition.
C. Set DVM on 2 volt scale.
D. Connect meter positive (+) lead to positive (+) battery post, and the meter negative (-) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter. While cranking the engine, record the voltage reading.
The maximum allowable voltage drop including the solenoid or external relay in the starter circuit should be 0.6 volts or less.
If you find more than a 0.6 volt drop in the starter circuit, you can isolate the bad connection by using the following voltage drop tests.
* Check the positive battery post and cable connection by measuring the voltage drop between the two while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the battery post and the meter negative lead to the cable clamp. A good post/cable connection should have zero voltage drop.
* Check the positive battery cable by measuring the voltage drop end to end while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the clamp on the positive battery cable, and the meter negative lead to the end of the cable at the starter. Crank the engine and note the voltage reading. A good cable should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
* To check the starter solenoid or relay connections, connect the meter positive lead to positive battery terminal on the solenoid or relay, and the meter negative lead to the starter motor terminal. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
Next, you need to check the negative side of the starter circuit. To check the entire circuit, connect the meter positive lead to a clean spot on the starter motor case and the meter negative lead to the negative battery post. Crank the engine and note the reading. The voltage drop on the negative side should be 0.3 volts or less.
If the voltage drop is too high, set your DVM to the 2 volt scale and start checking each connection on the negative side to find the bad connection or cable. Use the DVM leads to check across each connection while cranking the engine as before.
Check the negative battery post/ground cable connection (should be zero voltage drop).
Check the negative ground cable from the battery to the engine (should be 0.2 volts or less).
Check between the negative battery post and starter housing (should be 0.3 volts or less).
Check between the engine block and starter housing (should be 0.10 volts or less).
CHECKING THE CHARGING CIRCUIT
To check the alternator connections on the positive side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect the meter positive lead to the alternator output stud (B+ terminal).
C. Connect the meter negative lead to the positive (+) battery post.
D. With the engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except the rear electric defroster), check the voltage drop reading. It should be 0.5 volts or less. If higher, the connections between the alternator output stud and battery need to be cleaned. Also, look for loose connections or undersized cables.
To check the alternator connections on the negative side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect meter negative lead to alternator case.
C. Connect meter positive lead to battery negative (-) post.
D. With engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except rear defogger), check the voltage drop reading. On the negative side, it should be 0.2 volts or less. If excessive, the connections need cleaning or the negative cable needs to be replaced. Some alternators are mounted in rubber bushings and have a separate ground strap. If so equipped, be sure to check the voltage drop across this strap, too.

egulator checked with voltmeter?

Nov 15, 2009 | 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee

5 Answers

Battery not charging everything is good


There seems to be a no charge state in this case. i recommend checking the charging system. use the procedure below to isolate this issue.

Wear protective eye wear and clothing and remove all jewelry when checking your battery and charging system. Jewelry is a good conductor of electricity and is not recommended. Most batteries wear out every 3 to 5 years and need to be replaced. Always replace your battery with an equal replacement battery to assure proper operation. Automotive batteries have a +positive terminal (red), - negative terminal (black). Electricity is stored in the battery and then supplied to the vehicle when the engine is not running. While the engine is running the vehicles alternator charges the battery for future use. (Note: never disconnect the battery while the engine is running. If the battery cable is disconnected from the battery a spark can be generated which can cause the battery to explode or a major electrical malfunction to occur.)

To check a battery surface voltage, remove the positive terminal protective cover. Connect the +positive side meter lead (red) to the positive side battery terminal. Connect the - negative (black) side meter lead to the negative battery terminal. With the vehicle not running and the car sitting over night the battery voltage should be between 12.5 and 12.8 volts.(You will need to use a voltmeter for this testing procedure)

The alternator is rotated by a drive belt driven by the vehicles engine while it is running. Electrical voltage and amperage are generated to recharge the battery and supply voltage to the electrical system of the car. The alternator is held in place with mounting bolts. There is a main electrical wire on the rear of the alternator that supplies voltage to a main voltage junction box. If your alternator is not charging properly, your battery will slowly drain down from operating all the electrical systems in your car and stop the car from running.(most non charge states will be the cause of a loose belt or a low tension rate, due to a mis-adjusted alternator. make sure you have enough tension in the belt for full rotation of the alt pulley)

Next, you will need to check the alternators output with the Amp meter.

Testing the amperage output of the alternator is good for measuring the amount (not the level) of voltage the alternator can produce. This test can be tricky because if the alternator is weak it can still show it as producing amperage. Which is good, but if the voltage is low, it will still allow the battery to go dead. To check the amperage output of an alternator an amp meter is needed. Once the meter is connected start the engine. Next turn on all electrical accessories and raise the engine idle to about 1200 RPM. The alternator should output the max amperage it was designed to produce. Example: a 90 amp alternator should output about 88 amps. Note: An alternator cannot sustain maximum output for long periods of time. If the alternator is forced to operate at maximum output it will overheat and fail. An alternator is designed to operate at max amperage output only for a reasonable amount of time.

((Connect the voltage meter lead the same way you would in a battery static voltage check, Start engine (do not drive) at engine idle the voltage should be between 13.6 to 14.3 volts. If not the alternator may need replacing.)))

Nov 14, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

1996 SATURN 16 VALVE TWIN CAM BATTERY LIGHT CAME ON THEN TWO DAYS LATER WOULDN'T START


There seems to be a no charge state in this case. i recommend checking the charging system. use the procedure below to isolate this issue.

Wear protective eye wear and clothing and remove all jewelry when checking your battery and charging system. Jewelry is a good conductor of electricity and is not recommended. Most batteries wear out every 3 to 5 years and need to be replaced. Always replace your battery with an equal replacement battery to assure proper operation. Automotive batteries have a +positive terminal (red), - negative terminal (black). Electricity is stored in the battery and then supplied to the vehicle when the engine is not running. While the engine is running the vehicles alternator charges the battery for future use. (Note: never disconnect the battery while the engine is running. If the battery cable is disconnected from the battery a spark can be generated which can cause the battery to explode or a major electrical malfunction to occur.)

To check a battery surface voltage, remove the positive terminal protective cover. Connect the +positive side meter lead (red) to the positive side battery terminal. Connect the - negative (black) side meter lead to the negative battery terminal. With the vehicle not running and the car sitting over night the battery voltage should be between 12.5 and 12.8 volts.(You will need to use a voltmeter for this testing procedure)

The alternator is rotated by a drive belt driven by the vehicles engine while it is running. Electrical voltage and amperage are generated to recharge the battery and supply voltage to the electrical system of the car. The alternator is held in place with mounting bolts. There is a main electrical wire on the rear of the alternator that supplies voltage to a main voltage junction box. If your alternator is not charging properly, your battery will slowly drain down from operating all the electrical systems in your car and stop the car from running.(most non charge states will be the cause of a loose belt or a low tension rate, due to a mis-adjusted alternator. make sure you have enough tension in the belt for full rotation of the alt pulley)

Next, you will need to check the alternators output with the Amp meter.

Testing the amperage output of the alternator is good for measuring the amount (not the level) of voltage the alternator can produce. This test can be tricky because if the alternator is weak it can still show it as producing amperage. Which is good, but if the voltage is low, it will still allow the battery to go dead. To check the amperage output of an alternator an amp meter is needed. Once the meter is connected start the engine. Next turn on all electrical accessories and raise the engine idle to about 1200 RPM. The alternator should output the max amperage it was designed to produce. Example: a 90 amp alternator should output about 88 amps. Note: An alternator cannot sustain maximum output for long periods of time. If the alternator is forced to operate at maximum output it will overheat and fail. An alternator is designed to operate at max amperage output only for a reasonable amount of time.

((Connect the voltage meter lead the same way you would in a battery static voltage check, Start engine (do not drive) at engine idle the voltage should be between 13.6 to 14.3 volts. If not the alternator may need replacing.)))

Nov 10, 2009 | 1996 Saturn SC

2 Answers

1997 Cadillac Catera: When the AC is on and the cooling fan comes on the charging guage drops to almost the red. voltage at battery drops from 14.6 to 13.2 and shows undercharge on a battery testing meter....


A charge rate of 13.2 is fine...Likely your battery is getting older and is not charging as well as it used to. You should periodically re-charge the battery using an external charger, as the alternators actual function is to maintain the batteries state of charge, not to re-charge it. Opening the doors, playing the radio with the engine off etc, can and will drain your battery. The alternator will only put a surface charge there and will not actually replace this lost power. I'd begin to worry if charge rate dropped below 12.9.but even then you likely would not have any real problems.

Jul 16, 2009 | 1997 Cadillac Catera

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