Question about 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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Trying to find toe-in specs for a 99 JGC, 4WD, 4.7, tow package. + 1/8" has been suggested, but want to be sure. Just replaced tie rod ends and have the "squeals" going around corners, etc.

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If you have just spent the money on yierod ends I would take it to a front end shop and have them do a front end alignment there is much more to a front end then just toe in and toe out, they will set your caster camber and toe in for you

Posted on Sep 07, 2009

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1 Answer

What's the outer tie rod end torque specs for 2000 Dodge Dakota sport ?


this was copied off of the following link. should be same torque requirments-
this is off a 2004 manual,which should be real close if not exact

INSTALLATION
1. Align reference marks and install pitman arm.
2. Install the lock washer and retaining nut on the pitman
shaft and tighten nut to 251 N·m (185 ft. lbs.).
3. Install the drag link (1) to the pitman arm (5). Install
the nut (4) and tighten to 54 N·m (40 ft. lbs.) Then
an additional 90°.
4. Remove the supports and lower the vehicle to the
surface. Center steering wheel> and adjust toe,
(Refer to 2 - SUSPENSION/WHEEL ALIGNMENT -
STANDARD PROCEDURE).
5. After adjustment tighten tie rod adjustment sleeve
clamp> bolts to 61 N·m (45 ft. lbs.).
NOTE: Position the clamp on the sleeve so retaining
bolt is located on the bottom side of the
sleeve

got it from here -

Tie rod end torque spec DodgeTalk Dodge Car Forums Dodge Truck Forums and...

Feb 23, 2015 | Dodge Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to adjust toe on 2000 lincoln continental


adjust the tie rod ends to achieve toe-in/out adjustment. Measure across the wheels at the front of the steering tyre and then measure across the tyre at the rear of the steering tyre ( same height) and see what the difference is. Adjust the tie rod ends until the front measurement is smaller than the rear by about 1/8 inch . Lock up the lock nuts on the tie rod ends.

May 19, 2014 | 2000 Lincoln Continental

2 Answers

Replace steering rack on 2004 grand prix


Jim, this is not a hard job but you must do it right. I suggest you purchase the Chilton Manual for your car. Before you take it apart mark the location of the outer tie rod ends so you can have the toe-in at least close when you reassemble. You might want to replace the outer tie rod ends at the same time. If i am buying a rebuilt unit i always try to get a "A-1 Cardone complete unit" with the inner tire rod ends already factory installed.

May 18, 2014 | 2001 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

Inner tie rod removal


The first step in replacing the inner tie rod is to remove the tie rod end. It's basically a three step process, where you start by loosening the jam nut that's used to set the alignment (toe-in or toe-out). That jam nut determines how far up the inner tie rod the tie rod end is fixed. The tie rod end is hollow and threaded, so it can be screwed on or off the inner tie rod. Any procedure for removing a tie rod will start by telling you to count the turns you unscrew the tie rod end, something that I didn't do, and I'll save the explanation for the end:-) After you loosen the jam nut, you remove the cotter pin from the post on the outer tie rod ball joint, and unscrew the nut that holds the ball joint into the tapered fitting on the steering knuckle (video to right). After you pop the outer tie end free of the steering knuckle, you can unscrew the tie rod end. from the inner tie rod, but you need to grip it with something. Inner tie rods normally have some flat surfaces or a splined surface for grabbing with pliers. In this case, I needed two pairs of visegrips and a clamp to hold the visegrips on the inner tie rod from moving in order to get the outer tie rod end broken free and turning easy. That video is below. I happen to own the shop manuals for my Dodge Omni, so I was able to study the procedure for replacing the inner tie rod in detail. I didn't follow it for a couple reason. First, they show my type of power steering rack (Saginaw vs TRW) needs to be removed from the car to change the inner tie rod. That's a lot of extra work, not to mention the fact I buried one of the crossmember bolts in my unibody and flooring repair! So I went with an inner tie rod removal kit from Harbor Freight, manufactured by U.S. General (in Taiwan). The tool is very simple, basically a large steel tub with a snap in opening for a large crows foot insert on one end and a 1/2" socket drive on the other end. The kit is shown in the photo to the lower left (which I need to replace), and a video of the procedure is shown below. The kit wasn't quite right for my car, I had to use an oversized crows foot and the ball joint housing on the inner tie rod was too long, so the flats on the housing were barely held with the crows foot positioned by hand at the very end of the tool. But I got it out.

Dec 16, 2010 | 1992 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

How to replace the tie rod end


Tie rod ends are replaceable, whether the steering system is rack and pinion or parallelogram steering system.
f42-02.gif Parallelogram steering system mounts. Figure A - behind front suspension; and Figure B - ahead of front suspension. f42-04.gif A rack and pinion steering system. Tie rod ends are threaded to provide a means of adjusting toe. When a tie rod is replaced, measure the old tie rod assembly before disassembling it. An approximate toe-in adjustment can be made to the new one prior to installation. When removing the old tie rod end, count the number of turns it takes to remove it. Then, turn the new tie rod end onto its threads the same number of turns.
Some vehicles have tie rods that appear to be the same on both ends. The difference is in the threads. One end has left hand threads and the other has right hand threads. It is possible to install the entire shaft backwards (which will work). Mark the tie rod to identify the inner or ourter end before removing it.
Before tightening tie rod clamps, check to see that they are in good condition and are positioned properly so they can be clamped tightly. Before doing a front end adjustment, spray penetrating oil on the threads of the tie rods. Do this during the steering linkage inspection so the lubricant has time to soak in.

Nov 12, 2010 | 2002 Dodge Stratus

1 Answer

How do you replace the inner tie rods on 2003 cadillac escalade


Some cars have tie rods and some have tie rod ends. If you have tie rods, one piece, you just replace the piece, the toe in , toe out is adj some place else. On a car with tie rod ends, you just replace the end, They are a bit tricky to get out, 2 small sledge hammers and bang on the ball at the same time will pop it out of it's socket, then count the number on turns to take it out, then count he turns going back in, and put the nut on, clamp it up, and it should be just like new. Hope this helps.

Mar 11, 2010 | 2003 Cadillac Escalade

1 Answer

Tie rod replacement cost


Hi Gcg_77,
You will need to contact your local auto parts store to get price for the tie rod ends.My flat rate manual listed them at $65 a piece but this is an old price.
The labor time listed for these are as follows:

1 inner tie rod end is listed at 1.4 hours,if you replace both it is listed at 2.0 hours.
1 outer tie rod end is listed at 1.1 hours,if you replace both it is listed at 1.4 hours.
These times include resetting the toe only. If you want a complete alignment you deduct 0.4 hours labor and charge full alignment price.
Hope this helps. If you need anything else,let me know. Thanks,Chuck

Feb 11, 2010 | 2006 Dodge Charger

1 Answer

Impact bent the right front tie rod. how can it be removed for straightening or replacing?


First loosen the jam nut with a 21mm wrench. Then use vise grips or whatever you have to make sure the rod can be turned that goes into the outer tie rod. Then remove the cotter pin and 17mm castle nut. Strike the hub where the tie rod goes through with a hammer repeatedly until the tie rod pops out of the hole.

Then simply unscrew the tie rod end and replace it. If the inner tie rod end is also damaged, or the rod is damaged you will need to replace them as well. Inner tie rods have a special tool to remove them, see your local auto parts store.

Remember, replacing an outer tie rod end changes your cars toe (alignment). You will require an alignment after replacing it, even if you think the car drives straight.

Good luck!

Nov 30, 2009 | 2002 Hyundai Accent

1 Answer

How to install tie rods on a 1993 del sol


Instructions Things You'll Need:
  • Lug nut wrench
  • Jack
  • Jack stands
  • Wrench or pliers
  • Tie rod puller
  • Marker or paint
  • Pen and paper
  • Anti-seize compound
  • Torque wrench
    Remove the Tie Rod End
  1. Step 1 Purchase tie rod ends that are specific to your Honda model and year, for tie rod ends vary from model year to model year. The tie rod ends often come with nuts and cotter pins (glorified bobby pins).
  2. Step 2 Loosen the lug nuts on the front tires, but don't remove them. Jack up your vehicle, then support it securely on jack stands. Remove the tires.
  3. Step 3 Use a wrench or piers to loosen the outer tie rod's locking nut, but do so by only 1/8th of a turn. Mark the tie rod end's position on the threaded portion of the tie rod with paint or a marker.
  4. Step 4 Take out the cotter pin or key and use a wrench or pliers to loosen and remove the castellated nut from the outer tie rod end's spindle.
  5. Step 5 Separate the tie rod and the steering knuckle with a tie rod puller.
  6. Step 6 Grasp the tie rod with a wrench while you screw off the tie rod end. Make sure you keep track of the number of turns it takes to remove it, and write that number down. It'll help you when you install the replacement tie rod end.
    Replace the Tie Rod End
  7. Step 1 Put a coat of anti-seize compound on the threaded portion of the tie rod end, and screw on the lock nut for the tie rod end.
  8. Step 2 Screw on the tie rod end, making sure you do it in the same number of turns as it took to remove the original tie rod end (see Section One, Step 6).
  9. Step 3 Slip the tapered end of the tie rod end into the steering knuckle and tighten the castellated nut to 29 to 35 foot pounds. If your tie rod end doesn't come with a castellated nut, tighten that nut to 32 foot pounds.
  10. Step 4 Install the new cotter pin and tighten the tie rod end's lock nut. Repeat Sections 1 and 2 for the other tie rod end.
  11. Step 5 Reinstall the tires, tighten the lug nuts and get the Honda aligned.

Oct 28, 2009 | 1994 Honda Civic Del Sol

3 Answers

Wheel alignment


The main cause of steering wheel off-center is toe misalignment or rear axle misalignment. Toe can fall out of adjustment fairly easily as a result of daily driving, so you can imagine the effects of pounding it through 4WD trails on a regular basis.

Toe is designed to preload the steering linkage to remove play in the system. You can visualize toe angle from above; toe-in, or positive toe, is displayed when the leading edges of the tires are closer together than in the rear. Toe-out, or negative toe, is when the leading edges are farther apart. Zero toe is when wheels are pointed straight ahead and are parallel to each other. A slight amount of positive toe is preferred for most vehicles.

Improper toe angle isn't the only reason a steering wheel won't center. This phenomenon can also be caused by the steering linkage not being centered when toe was adjusted in the first place. This can be corrected by recentering the steering wheel and readjusting toe to proper specs. A bent steering arm or linkage component can also cause the steering wheel to be off-center. I've also seen this occur due to loose steering arm bolts. An off-center steering wheel contributes to tire wear because as the wheels are turned off dead center they turn toe out and increase tire scrubbing.

Sometimes an off-center steering wheel is accompanied by a wheel pull to one direction or the other and could be the result of a damaged component somewhere in the vehicle - a bent axlehousing could be throwing off the rear toe setting (rear toe setting is often overlooked). A bent frame or overly worn suspension bushings can also be the cause. If your wheel is off-center and also pulling, it can be as simple as incorrect tire pressure from side to side. Memory steer is another effect that is usually associated with an off-center steering wheel. This is when the steering wheel returns to an off-center position and can result in steering pull or drift after completing a turn. This can be caused by binding in the steering linkage as well as power steering system issues such as leaks or improper hydraulic pressure. Steering linkage bind occurs when proper geometry is not maintained in lifted vehicles.

Many 4x4s don't have factory provisions for adjusting caster and camber and rear toe and camber, but the front toe setting is easily adjusted. Toe is controlled by the steering linkage. By loosening the adjusters on the tie rod and shortening or lengthening the tie rod by turning the ends, toe angle can be adjusted. This should not be a substitute for regular professional wheel alignment jobs and is simply a tip that can be used to put off frequent trips to the alignment shop due to regular trips to the trail.
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Before determining toe angle and/or performing adjustments, it's a good idea to start the engine and turn the steering wheel side to side to relieve pressure in the system. Then, turn the wheels straight and shut off the engine. You should also roll the vehicle back and forth a few times between measurements.

Get someone to hold the other end of the measuring tape and measure the leading toe distance. This is the distance between the leading edges of the front tires. You'll compare the results to the distance between the trailing edges of the tires directly opposite from where you took the first measurement.

The higher number will indicate toe direction: higher number in leading edge indicates toe out; higher number at trailing edge displays toe in. Larger-than-stock tires require more positive toe for best results.

Once the necessary measurements are performed to determine what the current toe setting is, you can loosen the bolts on the tie-rod adjuster sleeve so that the tie-rod ends can be rotated. Don't forgot to tighten the adjusters when you're done as damage or injury could result.

The tie-rod ends thread into the tie rod. The ends can be threaded in or out of the tie rod to make the assembly longer or shorter. Longer creates more toe out; shorter toe in. Don't make huge adjustments all at once. It's best to adjust and measure a few times to achieve appropriate setting.
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I hope this helps you if you were looking to do a toe alignment yourself if you have decent knowledge of component location on a jeep.

Jan 30, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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