Question about 2004 Toyota Prius

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I have been told that the rear brake pads on my Prius wear down at the same rate as the disks and that new pads will always require new disks.

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No. The disks are of metal and don't wear out easily; in fact they go along with the car if you replace pads as soon they wear-out.

Posted on Jul 30, 2009

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Rear brakes gone within a year brand new vehicle


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Brakes are going to the floor most of the way checked rear brakes and they are still good bleed them and problem still there


Normally when the brake pedal goes almos to the floor it is an indication of low brake fluid. Low brake fluid is an indication that front and/or rear brakes are wearing. As the brake pads wear down more brake fluid will be required in the wheel cylinders or calipers. Hint, the front brakes usually wear much faster than the rear due to the fact that the fronts due a much greater braking function that the rear. Check the front pads. Don't let them get down to the metal scraping metal stage before you change them out. This causes unnessary damage to the rotors. Look at your master cylinder on the firewall under the hood in front of the steering wheel. If the fluid level is belowhte "max" mark add fluid. Low fliud should also show as a red "brake" light on your dash, but not always.

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Replace rear brake pads


Rear disc brake pads offer better performance and are not as affected by moisture like conventional brake shoe style brakes are. Rear disc brakes are similar to front disc brakes. The main difference is that rear disc brake systems must incorporate the emergency brake system. There are two methods widely used for the emergency brake with rear disc systems. The first system is a brake shoe inside the brake disc that is actuated by the emergency brake lever. The second is a screw style actuator inside the brake caliper. When activated the brake pads are forced into the brake disc and held tightly by the emergency brake lever.
READ COMPLETELY BEFORE STARTING
Step 1 - Identify Rear Disc Brake Components
rear_brake_pads.jpg Rear disc brake assembly includes; rear brake disc, rear brake pads, brake caliper mount and a caliper mounting screw. (Note: Some vehicles do not have the rotor mounting screw.)
Step 2 - Removing the Rear Brake Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_2.jpg To replace rear brake pads and rotors the rear brake caliper needs to be removed. First loosen the rear brake caliper mount bolts and remove them. Turn counter clockwise.
Step 3 - Lift Rear Brake Caliper from The Caliper Mount
rear_brake_pads_3.jpg After the caliper mount bolts have been removed, gently lift the brake caliper from the caliper mount. Inspect the caliper slides; they should move freely in the caliper mount. Remove rear brake pads and hardware.

Step 4 - Removing Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_4.jpg With a socket wrench or other appropriate removal tool, loosen the rear brake caliper mounting bolts. Remove bolts and lift the caliper mount and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole. Tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub holding on tightly, using both hands. You do not want to drop the rotor.

Step 5 - Removing Rear Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor.jpg Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole, tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub, hold on using both hands and do not drop.

Step 6 - Install New Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor_2.jpg Check the new rotor against the old brake rotor to make sure they are the same size. Clean the mating surface on the wheel hub before the new brake rotor is installed. Reinstall rotor retainer screw.
Step 7 - Reset Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brakes_7.jpg Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
Step 8 - Reinstall Rear Caliper Mount and Install New Rear Brake Pads
rear_brake_rotor_3.jpg After the caliper has been reset, reinstall caliper mounting bolts and make sure the bolts are tight. Then match up the old brake pads to the new brake pads. They should be exactly the same except, of course; the old ones will be worn out. Check the new brake pads for proper fit and install any brake hardware that is required.
Step 9 - Remount Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brake_rotor_4.jpg Reinstall the brake caliper, align brake pad hardware and reinstall caliper mounting bolts. (Note: align the rear peg of the brake pad to the groove in the caliper piston.) Recheck and retighten all caliper and caliper mount bolts. Bleed brake system to relieve any air in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly. This operation forces the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors. DO NOT DRIVE VEHICLE until proper brake pedal operation resumes. When test driving vehicle listen for any unusual noises during the operation of the brakes.
WARNING! Always have the vehicle under inspection on level ground, in park with the emergency brake on. Always wear protective eyewear, gloves and necessary clothing before inspection or work begins. Never crank an engine over when anyone is near the battery or engine. Always have an operational fire extinguisher close by, obey all first aid instructions in the event of an injury. Never stand in front or behind a vehicle when cranked over or running. When engine is cranked over keep hands and clothing away from rotating components. Never move a car without proper brake pedal operation.

Jun 01, 2010 | 1995 Saab 900

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Toyota prius 2007 when do I have to replace the front brakes pad


if you have original pads fitted,they have wear sensors inbuilt so that you will get a warning light on the dash display.if not,when they get down to 1/8th inch thick......

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How to change rear brake pads for a honda 2007 ridgeline


The 2007 Honda Accord is equipped with four wheel disk brakes. Disk brakes wear down and require regular maintenance. Worn brake pads can cause squeeling and grinding noises, as well as reduced braking power. Improperly maintained brake pads can cause damage to the brake rotors as well as brake failure. Save on labor costs by replacing your own brake pads.www.lightdeal.co.uk

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New brakes needed on 2005 TSX with 23K miles


Thats low mileage for an 05...congrats. It is also way way low to be needing rear brakes!!!, The front brakes ALWAYS need replacement before the rear, unless you have a malfunction...or have been driving with the emergency brake on, (the emergency brake just works on the rear). Also, unless the brakes have been metal on metal, no way you should need new rear rotors with that mileage...I realize you trust your dealer, but, I'd get a 2nd opinion. As for the driving, sure, driving habits have a bearing on brake wear, and yes, you have probably done alot of stop and start, but probably at low speeds also. At any rate, you should not be replacing rear pads and certainly not rotors with 23K...unless there is another problem..Hope this helps!

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I have a 2002 Nissan Quest and the rear brakes are making grinding and squeaking noises while braking. The rear brakes were replaced a month ago and since then it's been making those noises. I have read...


Make sure the rotors (the disks that the tire rim are mounted on), are smooth. If they are rough, then they are wearing your break pads down. Even if the break pads are new, bad rotors will grind them down. Change the rotors...

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