Question about 2000 Hyundai Sonata

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A/C system does not cool vehicle compartment completely

New compressor, no condesation on the ground when car is running, a/c Does not cool car below 80 degrees when 90 degrees outside, whats wrong with a/c system??

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Needs to be properly charged

Posted on Jul 29, 2009

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Ttrying to fine out where to put the air for the airshock


Vehicles: Cadillacs with ALC-controlled rear shock absorbers

Each rear shock absorber has an ALC (air) port. One may disconnect the ALC air line and try to add air, but this is unlikely to work, since there is no spring-loaded valve to close the port off immediately (like a tire).

A better method for inflating the rear shocks to see if they hold air is to supply 12V DC (from the battery) directly to the ALC system (air) compressor.

Debugging your Cadillac's ALC system can be a challenge. Here are a few basics.

Here's a depiction of the ALC port on the rear shock - found at the end of the ALC air tube.


12_2_2011_12_54_42_am.jpg

Fig. 1 The ALC connection on the rear shock absorber

Here's a close-up of the Cadillac ALC port on the rear shock


12_2_2011_12_59_49_am.jpg

Fig.2 Cadillac ALC air line fitting

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Automatic Level Control System - General Description
Vehicles Without Road Sensing Suspension

The Automatic Level Control (ALC) system automatically adjusts the rear height of the vehicle in response to changes in vehicle loading.

The ALC system consists of a height sensor, an air compressor assembly, an ALC compressor relay, an intake hose and filter, an air tube, and two rear shock absorbers . The air compressor assembly consists of an air compressor and an air dryer mounted on a bracket. The air compressor head is a replaceable part of the air compressor. The (air) exhaust solenoid is a non-replaceable part of the air compressor head.

The compressor is activated when the ignition is on, and weight is added to the vehicle. The exhaust solenoid is connected directly to the battery (+), enabling the system to exhaust with the ignition on or off when excess weight is removed.

Vehicles With Road Sensing Suspension
The Automatic Level Control (ALC) system automatically adjusts the rear height of the vehicle in response to changes in vehicle loading.

The ALC system consists of the CVRSS control module, two CVRSS position sensors, an air compressor assembly, an ALC compressor relay, an intake hose and filter, an air tube, and two rear shock absorbers. The air compressor assembly consists of an air compressor and an air dryer mounted on a bracket. The air compressor head is a replaceable part of the air compressor. The exhaust solenoid is a non-replaceable part of the air compressor head.

The vehicles rear vertical height is measured by the two CVRSS position sensors. These two position sensors convert this rear height measurement into an analog voltage (0 to 5 volts DC) which is read by the CVRSS control module. The control module then determines what action (exhaust, compress, or no action) shall take place. To compress, the CVRSS control module switches the low-side of the ELC compressor relay to ground.

The air compressor is enabled (switched to battery only when the ignition is on. The air compressor is activated when a sufficient amount of weight has been added to the vehicle.

The exhaust solenoid is enabled at all times. The exhaust solenoid is activated when weight is removed from the vehicle.

Automatic Level Control System Operation w/o F45

Raising the Vehicle
When a load is added to the vehicle, the vehicle body moves down causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate upward. The upward arm movement activates an internal timing circuit and, after an initial fixed delay of 17 to 27 seconds, the sensor provides a ground to complete the compressor relay circuit. The 12V (+) circuit to the compressor is then complete and the compressor runs, sending pressurized air to the shock absorbers through the air tubes.

As the shock absorbers inflate, the vehicle body moves upward rotating the actuating arm towards its original position. Once the body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the sensor opens the compressor relay circuit, and the compressor is turned off.

Air Compressor Head Relief Sequence
In order to reduce current draw during air compressor starting, the height sensor performs an air compressor head relief sequence before air compressor operation. This sequence reduces the air pressure in the air compressor cylinder during start-up. The air compressor head relief sequence occurs as follows:

Exhaust solenoid is energized.
Air compressor is activated 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
Exhaust solenoid is de-energized 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.
Lowering the Vehicle
When a load is removed from the rear of the vehicle, the body rises, causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate downward. This again activates the internal timing circuit. After the initial fixed delay, the sensor provides a ground to complete the exhaust solenoid circuit, energizing the solenoid. Now, air starts exhausting out of the shock absorbers, back through the air dryer and exhaust solenoid valve, and into the atmosphere.

As the vehicle body lowers, the actuating arm rotates to its original position. When the vehicle body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the sensor opens the exhaust solenoid circuit, which closes the exhaust solenoid and prevents air from escaping.

Air Replenishment Cycle
The sensor actuating arm position is checked when the ignition is turned on. If the sensor indicates that no height adjustment is needed, an internal timer circuit is activated. After about 35 to 55 seconds, the compressor is turned on for 3 to 5 seconds. This ensures that the shock absorbers are filled with the proper residual pressure. If weight is added to or removed from the vehicle during the time delay, the air replenishment cycle is overridden, and the vehicle rises or lowers after the normal delay.

Automatic Level Control System Operation w/ F45

Raising the Vehicle
When a load is added to the vehicle, the vehicle body moves down causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate upward. The upward arm movement activates an internal timing circuit and, after an initial fixed delay, the CVRSS control module provides a ground to complete the compressor relay circuit. The 12V (+) circuit to the compressor is then complete and the compressor runs, sending pressurized air to the shock absorbers through the air tubes.

As the shock absorbers inflate, the vehicle body moves upward rotating the actuating arm towards its original position. Once the body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the compressor relay circuit is opened and the compressor is turned off.

Air Compressor Head Relief Sequence
In order to reduce current draw during air compressor starting, the CVRSS control module performs an air compressor head relief sequence before air compressor operation. This sequence reduces the air pressure in the air compressor cylinder during start-up. The air compressor head relief sequence occurs as follows:

Exhaust solenoid is energized.
Air compressor is activated 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
Exhaust solenoid is de-energized 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.

Lowering the Vehicle
When a load is removed from the rear of the vehicle, the body rises, causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate downward. This again activates the internal timing circuit. After the initial fixed delay, the CVRSS control module provides a ground to complete the exhaust solenoid circuit, energizing the solenoid. Now, air starts exhausting out of the shock absorbers, back through the air dryer and exhaust solenoid valve, and into the atmosphere.

As the vehicle body lowers, the actuating arm rotates to its original position. When the vehicle body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the exhaust solenoid circuit is opened, which closes the exhaust solenoid and prevents air from escaping.

Air Replenishment Cycle
An air replenishment cycle (ARC) is commanded after each ignition-ON cycle. The purpose of the ARC is to ensure that the ALC system is operating at or above minimum air pressure (residual air pressure). The ARC occurs as follows:

The EXHAUST SOLENOID IS ENERGIZED 20 seconds after the ignition has been turned on.
The AIR COMPRESSOR IS ACTIVATED 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
The EXHAUST SOLENOID IS DE-ENERGIZED 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.
The AIR COMPRESSOR IS DEACTIVATED 3.2 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is de-energized.

Dec 01, 2011 | 1998 Cadillac DeVille

4 Answers

Air Con


no the pipes should not be cold and wet but if you just have stop using the aircon recently it will do that for a while till all the gas is out of the system so yes its sorta normal

Oct 02, 2008 | 2001 Chrysler PT Cruiser

2 Answers

When my A/C is turned on it sounds as if the compressor is running for 5 seconds and then it shuts off. This continues repeating. I have no cool air. Is this possibly a bad compressor or compressor clutch?


It is certainly a possibility but the first thing to check is if the system is low on Freon. Your vehicle is old enough that it might still use R-22 which would be bad as that is not available for the do it yourself type person. If it is 134A then you can get a refill kit at Walmart for $14. It comes with a can of coolant with a connector Hose and Gauge attached so you don't over charge the system.

Jun 26, 2010 | 1996 Dodge Dakota

1 Answer

Change heater core in 1999 madza truck? need to know how?


INSTRUCTIONS TO REPLACE HEATER CORE:
(1)Disarm the airbag system;
(2)allow the cooling system to completely cool down;
(3)using a thick cloth for protection, turn the radiator filler cap to the first stop;
(4)step back and let the pressure release;
(5)once the pressure has been released, completely drain the cooling system;
(6) working within the engine compartment, loosen the ****,ps on the heater hoses at the engine compartment side of the firewall, twist the hoses and carefully sepseparate them from the heater core tubes;
(7)plug or cap the heater core tubes to prevent coolant from spilling into the passenger compartment when the heater core is removed;
(8)place a plastic sheet on the floor of the vehicle to prevent stains if the coolant spills;
(9)remove the instrument panel;
(10)remove the PCM heat sink and ground strap;
(11)remove the heater plenum chamber;
(12)separate the heater core from the heater plenum chamber; (13)installation is the reverse of the removal with the following additions; (a)fill the cooling system; (b)run the engine, check for leaks and test the heater.

Nov 13, 2009 | 1999 Mazda Pickup

1 Answer

Heater core


From Haynes Repair Manual #36071, Ford Ranger Pickups 1993 - 2005: (1)Disarm the airbag system; (2)allow the cooling system to completely cool down; (3)using a thick cloth for protection, turn the radiator filler cap to the first stop; (4)step back and let the pressure release; (5)once the pressure has been released, completely drain the cooling system; (6) working within the engine compartment, loosen the ****,ps on the heater hoses at the engine compartment side of the firewall, twist the hoses and carefully sepseparate them from the heater core tubes; (7)plug or cap the heater core tubes to prevent coolant from spilling into the passenger compartment when the heater core is removed; (8)place a plastic sheet on the floor of the vehicle to prevent stains if the coolant spills; (9)remove the instrument panel; (10)remove the PCM heat sink and ground strap; (11)remove the heater plenum chamber; (12)separate the heater core from the heater plenum chamber; (13)installation is the reverse of the removal with the following additions; (a)fill the cooling system; (b)run the engine, check for leaks and test the heater.

Sep 30, 2009 | 2001 Ford Ranger Regular Cab

3 Answers

A/C Compressor not kicking on


The power to run the compressor clutch coil goes from the battery, to the AC Clutch Relay, somewere in the engine compartment fuse box, then it goes to the positive side of the AC compressor clutch coil; goes thru the coil, activating the compressor, and then goes to complete the circuit through another switch (high pressure protection switch) in the back of the AC compressor and finally reaching negative or Ground.

Disconnect the AC compressor clutch connector and using a 12 V bulb with 2 wires (test lamp) check the following:

1.- connect 1 lamp wire to battery neg; with the other check both pins at connector with the AC in the RUN (AC and ignition switch on ) you should have power in one side.

2.- connect 1 lamp wire to battery positive and with the other check both pins at connector, lamp should light getting the ground from the clutch connector thru the high pressure compressor switch to ground.

On the other side what makes the relay close and let the power flow to the clutch works with the low pressure switch, (if the freon pressure is too low it opens and kills the ground to the relay coil and that kills the compressor), that low pressure switch is in the low pressure side of the freon tubing, the fat pipe that comes from inside the firewall into the accumulator/dryer, a big aluminum cylinder sitting on the right side of the engine compartment in GM cars.

To know if the low press switch is the cause you can unplug it and connect both legs with a paper clip for a minute or two, no more, you don't want to damage the compressor. anyway if jumping the switch makes the compressor come alive and kick in, you either have low freon pressure or a bad switch; it's time for the pressure gauges and check how the compressor is pumping and that is better left to a pro.

By the way you said that your system is a R-12 system, have you considered switching to R-134a the new "ozone friendly" freon? to do that you need to evacuate the system with a recycling machine and pull vacuum in your AC, if it holds the vacuum for a while, then you can be sure that there are not leaks and then dump 1.5 or 2 pound (check the labels in the engine compartment) of R-134a into your system. it will be a good idea to put some fluorescent leak detecting dye in the system to check for leaks, just in case..

Jun 13, 2009 | 1992 Oldsmobile 88

1 Answer

REPLACED DRYER ON 96 CONT NOW THE BACK WONT AIR UP FRONT DOES


maybe you got dirt in the line to the rear. Here's some background info:

The air suspension system includes the following major components:
  • Air compressor to supply air to the air springs (part of front spring and shock and rear spring and shock absorber assemblies
  • Front spring and shock (3C098) and rear spring and shock absorber (5A965) at each corner of the vehicle
  • Four linear air suspension height sensors (5359): two rear and two front height sensors to maintain the vehicle at the proper ride height; only LH rear height sensor is used for air suspension.
  • Dual-mode front spring and shock and rear shock absorber assemblies with internal actuator.
All system functions are controlled by vehicle dynamics control module (5A919). This control module receives inputs from several different sources. These inputs include:
  • vehicle speed via multiplex communication network
  • ignition switch position
  • door position via multiplex communication network
  • height sensor position
  • air suspension service switch
  • engine rpm via multiplex communication network
  • ride and steering personality settings via multiplex communications network
Communications monitor system operation and allow diagnosis of any concerns that may develop in the system.
  • System monitoring for the driver's use is provided through the instrument panel mounted message center indicator (10D898).
  • Diagnosis communication for the service technician is provided through the data link connector (14489) (DLC) under the instrument panel and Rotunda New Generation Star (NGS) Tester 007-00500 or equivalent.
The message center indicator will display AIR LEVELING DISABLED or CHECK RIDE CONTROL if the suspension system is not turned on or the vehicle dynamics control module detects a concern. If air leveling system disabled is displayed, check that air suspension service switch is in the ON position.
-------------------------------------------------------
Weight Added When weight is added to the vehicle, the air suspension system responds as follows:
  • Air suspension height sensor length is reduced from trim length, sending a "vehicle is low" signal to the vehicle dynamics control module (5A919).
  • To restore vehicle to the trim position, the vehicle dynamics control module turns the compressor on by grounding the compressor relay control Circuit 420 (DB/Y). The relay is ground-side switched.
  • To allow pressurized air to enter the rear spring (5560) and front spring and shock (3C098), the control module opens the solenoid valves (5311).
  • Compressed air flows from the compressor, through the compressor air drier assembly, air lines and solenoid valves into the air springs.
  • As the air springs raise the body height, the air suspension height sensor (5359) increases in length until the preset trim height is reached.
  • The vehicle dynamics control module then turns off the compressor (through the relay) and closes the air spring solenoid valves.
  • ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Weight Removed When weight is removed, the air suspension system responds as follows:
    • Air suspension height sensor length is increased from the trim length, sending a "vehicle is high" signal to the control module (5A919).
    • To restore the vehicle to the trim position, the vehicle dynamics control module opens the vent solenoid valve (located in the compressor assembly) and opens the solenoid valves (5311).
    • Compressed air flows from air springs, through the solenoid valves, air lines, compressor air drier (5346) and out the vent solenoid valve.
    • As the body lowers, the air suspension height sensor length decreases until the preset trim height is reached.
    • The vehicle dynamics control module then closes the vent and solenoid valves.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Control Module Power and Ground The vehicle dynamics control module (5A919) is located above the upper luggage compartment trim panel and lower module tray. Module power is provided by Circuit 418 (DG/Y) at Pins 36, 37, 56, 57, 58 and is powered through a Fuse 7 (30A) in power distribution box. Module ground is provided through control module wire harness Pins 6, 39, 40 and 60. The data link connector (14489) (DLC) is located in the passenger compartment under the instrument panel, 300 mm (12 inches) right of the steering column. This connector allows communications between the vehicle dynamics control module and either Rotunda New Generation Star (NGS) Tester 007-00500 or equivalent or Rotunda Service Bay Diagnostics System (SBDS)® 001-00001 or equivalent. When the CHECK RIDE CONTROL message is displayed in the message center indicator (10D898), a system error has been detected by the vehicle dynamics control module and is stored in the control module. This diagnostic trouble code (DTC) will be retained for the next 80 ignition switch cycles. If there is no repeat of the same error during these 80 ignition switch cycles, the control module will erase the DTC. Because of this self-erasing memory, a customer may have had a concern "just a few days ago" that is not retrieved from memory when Diagnostic Test Mode (DTC) "Retrieve/Clear Continuous DTCs" is executed. This must be kept in mind if you must tell customer that no current concern has been found. When the vehicle dynamics control module detects a concern, the air suspension system is disabled for the current ignition cycle. If the condition causing the concern clears up during the current ignition switch cycle, the system will not reactivate. For example, if the customer has severely overloaded the luggage compartment, the system will not be able to trim the vehicle without exceeding the compressor run time. This will generate a DTC that disables the computer controlled suspension system. If the customer then drives the vehicle and unloads the luggage compartment without turning the ignition switch OFF, the system will not adjust for the new load. The customer will experience poor ride quality and the vehicle will not adjust trim.

May 20, 2009 | 1996 Lincoln Continental

1 Answer

1990 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Regency compressor runs when car is off.


The compressor you refer to is the air suspension compressor. It provides air to adjust the ride height of the vehicle. If you will notice by looking underneath the rear of the vehicle you will notice air adjustable rear shocks, or struts. They have plastic tubing plumbed to the compressor under the hood. There is a ride height sensor for the rear of the vehicle attached from the chasis to the rear differential. Whenever the height of the rear of the car is below the threshold setting of the sensor, the system activates a relay and turns on the compressor to raise the rear of the vehicle above the minimum height specified by the manufacturer. As the vehicle ages the air envelopes of the struts loses structural integrity and seepage, or leakage develops. Some depletion of air is normal, but the compressor power supply is independent of the key position, so the compressor can run, and will run anytime the height falls below the minimum. If the car sets unattended for several days, (or weeks) the compressor can run the battery down while maintaining the minimum height. If the system leaks too much air the compressor can burn-out trying to replenish the system. If you notice the compressor runing for an extended period of time, or running too frequently you should have the system checked for the source of the leakage. (Or you can do it yourself with soapy water and a spray bottle by soaking the air bellows on the shocks or struts, and all the lines and fittings from the shocks to the compressor) If you intend to work underneath a vehicle, service stands are mandatory! DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES ATTEMPT UNDER VEHICLE SERVICE WITHOUT PROPER SERVICE STANDS IN PLACE AND STABILITY VERIFIED WITH APPROPRIATE FORCE TO PROVE THE VEHICLE CANNOT BE KNOCKED-OFF THE SERVICE STANDS!

Nov 01, 2008 | 1992 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight Regency

1 Answer

Replacing the heater core in 2000 mazda b3000


From Haynes Repair Manual #36071, Ford Ranger Pickups 1993 - 2005 and Mazda Pickups 1994-2005 B2300, B2500, B3000, B4000: (1)Disarm the airbag system; (2)allow the cooling system to completely cool down; (3)using a thick cloth for protection, turn the radiator filler cap to the first stop; (4)step back and let the pressure release; (5)once the pressure has been released, completely drain the cooling system; (6) working within the engine compartment, loosen the ****,ps on the heater hoses at the engine compartment side of the firewall, twist the hoses and carefully sepseparate them from the heater core tubes; (7)plug or cap the heater core tubes to prevent coolant from spilling into the passenger compartment when the heater core is removed; (8)place a plastic sheet on the floor of the vehicle to prevent stains if the coolant spills; (9)remove the instrument panel; (10)remove the PCM heat sink and ground strap; (11)remove the heater plenum chamber; (12)separate the heater core from the heater plenum chamber; (13)installation is the reverse of the removal with the following additions; (a)fill the cooling system; (b)run the engine, check for leaks and test the heater

Aug 21, 2008 | Mazda B3000 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

2000 Jeep Cherokee Air Conditioner


If compressor isn't kicking in, check the connector atop the a/c accumulator, beside the coolant recover tank, in the engine compartment. That connector is atop a black bottle, and the connector goes to the low pressure switch. These switches do fail, and you can jump a wire across the connector terminals to see if the compressor comes on (engine running). As this circuit provides part of the ground path from the compressor clutch, if the switch is open, the compressor will never turn on. If the switch is failed, it can be replaced without opening the a/c system. Just disconnect the connector, unscrew the switch, replace it, and reconnect the connector.

Jul 22, 2008 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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