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Ok,I checked for power from computor,good,IAC works,no leaky,12vlts and actuates, but still idle drops when added load is applied light ect....

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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Are you applying electrical load or mechanical load. Clarify symptoms..

Posted on May 20, 2017

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Idle drops way low with fan,lights,ect..., on@ operating temp195, IAC is good power,no leak, power from computor;yes,under load, lights ect..,what am I overlooking? 91GeoMetro 3 banger


The electrical load on the alternator will pull the engine RPM down. It takes 10 H.P. to run the alternator. The only recourse to low RPM at idle would be to install a larger diameter pulley on the alternator. Extended idle could result in low battery charge rate. Should be fine at hi way speed. The alternator will not put out below 750 Rpm.

May 20, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

What is an IAC Valve


Google is your friend in such questions.

  • Idle air control actuator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idle_air_control_actuator An idle air control actuator or idle air control valve (IAC actuator/valve) ... Idle air control actuator; MAP sensor; Mass flow sensor; Oxygen sensor; Starter motor;
  • how to tell if your iac valve is going bad - YouTube www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNO8GCN8jQA
    • BY TIMMY102345
    • 6 MIN
    • 939K VIEWS
    2009-09-07 · Video embedded · how to tell if your iac valve is going bad timmy102345. ... #372 Better repair method Toyota Camry Idle Air Control Valve - ...
  • 4 Ways to Check an Idle Air Control Valve - wikiHow www.wikihow.com/Check-an-Idle-Air-Control-Valve
    • 525K VIEWS
    2015-12-11 · How to Check an Idle Air Control Valve. ... Again, an idle air control valve can have an issue or fault without triggering a check engine light. 2.


  • There are also videos in this link. How to check and fix.

  • What is an IAC Valve Bing video

    May 12, 2016 | 1992 Toyota Paseo

    1 Answer

    My car starts fine when engine is warm. I turn it off then try starting it again. then starts up and shuts back off. does it like 3 times in a row. then I wait a few minutes then it starts up when I push...


    stalls, are complex
    if the engine is good (compression at spec)
    it this list.
    1: lost electric power to EFI system or spark.
    2: bad fuel.
    3: bad spark.
    4: bad fueling. (too much or too little.
    5: EGR stuck open
    6: ISC dead. or IAC dead. (idle air valves failing cold)

    there are tests for each.
    cold start failure only ! all else good, engine tuneup done?
    1: ECT fibbing like oh'bummer. (signals water temps of alaska in Panama? "floods, and your right foot helps./..........
    2: IAC (cold start fast idle air valve bad) same for right foot....
    3: check engine light on running? is it?

    ECT can cause gross over fueling.
    the IAC dead will cause gross under AIR which in fact causes flooding (less air plus same fuel = flood)
    bad fuel.


    Oct 12, 2013 | 1999 Honda Accord

    1 Answer

    Low idle


    Probably. Assuming the check engine light is not on, if you changed the IAC it could take driving the car for the computer to get the valve in the right spot.

    Aug 31, 2012 | 1992 Saturn SL1

    2 Answers

    Stalls while in drive with foot on brake , changed MAP Sensor, Crank Shaft Sensor , Distributor, Fuel Pump, Fuel Filter , have ran out of ideas


    I would check the IAC motor or idle air control motor, heres a little info.about the part.Stratus Sedan, 1999-2005 Idle Air Control Motor

    Print


    Description & Operation

    Not for Dodge Stratus Sedan
    The idle air control motor (IAC) attaches to the throttle body. It is an electric stepper motor. The PCM adjusts engine idle speed through the idle air control motor to compensate for engine load, coolant temperature or barometric pressure changes. The throttle body has an air bypass passage that provides air for the engine during closed throttle idle. The idle air control motor pintle protrudes into the air bypass passage and regulates airflow through it.
    The PCM adjusts engine idle speed by moving the IAC motor pintle in and out of the bypass passage. The adjustments are based on inputs the PCM receives. The inputs are from the throttle position sensor, crankshaft position sensor, coolant temperature sensor, MAP sensor, vehicle speed sensor and various switch operations (brake, park/neutral, air conditioning).

    0996b43f8020234f.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig.

    Not for Dodge Stratus Sedan
    When engine rpm is above idle speed, the IAC is used for the following functions:


    Off-idle dashpot Deceleration air flow control A/C compressor load control (also opens the passage slightly before the compressor is engaged so that the engine rpm does not dip down when the compressor engages)
    The idle air control motor (IAC) attaches to the throttle body. It is an electric stepper motor. The PCM adjusts engine idle speed through the idle air control motor to compensate for engine load, coolant temperature or barometric pressure changes. The throttle body has an air bypass passage that provides air for the engine during closed throttle idle. The idle air control motor pintle protrudes into the air bypass passage and regulates airflow through it.
    The PCM adjusts engine idle speed by moving the IAC motor pintle in and out of the bypass passage. The adjustments are based on inputs the PCM receives. The inputs are from the throttle position sensor, crankshaft position sensor, coolant temperature sensor, MAP sensor, vehicle speed sensor and various switch operations (brake, park/neutral, air conditioning).

    21180_cdia_g257.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig.

    When engine rpm is above idle speed, the IAC is used for the following functions:


    Off-idle dashpot Deceleration air flow control A/C compressor load control (also opens the passage slightly before the compressor is engaged so that the engine rpm does not dip down when the compressor engages)
    Target Idle
    Target idle is determined by the following inputs:


    Gear position ECT Sensor Battery voltage Ambient/Battery Temperature Sensor VSS TPS MAP Sensor
    Target idle is determined by the following inputs:


    Gear position ECT Sensor Battery voltage Ambient/Battery Temperature Sensor VSS TPS MAP Sensor


    Removal & Installation

    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
    2. Disconnect the IAC electrical connector.
    3. Remove the IAC mounting screws.
    4. Remove the IAC.

    To Install:
    1. Install the IAC to the throttle body.
    2. Tighten mounting screws to 5.1 Nm (45 inch lbs.) torque.
    3. Attach electrical connector to the IAC.
    4. Connect the negative battery cable.

      0996b43f80202350.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

      Fig.


    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
    2. Disconnect the IAC electrical connector.
    3. Remove the IAC mounting screws.
    4. Remove the IAC.

    To Install:
    1. Install the IAC to the throttle body.
    2. Tighten mounting screws to 5.1 Nm (45 inch lbs.) torque.
    3. Attach electrical connector to the IAC.
    4. Connect the negative battery cable.

    May 11, 2012 | 2000 Chrysler Cirrus

    2 Answers

    The engine has recently started to idle very fast when the car is in park, and tapping the gas pedal doesn't help.


    Examine all the vacuum hoses as one most likely has cracked, usually at a bend or
    has come completely off. This will cause very high idle.Hope this helps.

    Apr 01, 2011 | 1988 Plymouth Sundance

    1 Answer

    Check engine light on egr code


    Check the EGR valve for functioning:

    COMPONENT TESTING DPFE Sensor
    1. Disconnect the pressure hoses at the DPFE sensor.
    2. Connect a hand vacuum pump to the downstream pickup marked REF on the sensor.
    3. Using a multimeter, backprobe the SIG RTN circuit at the DPFE connector.
    4. With the ignition ON, signal voltage should be 0.20-0.70 volts.
    5. Apply 8-9 in. Hg of vacuum to the sensor. Voltage should be greater than 4 volts.
    6. Quickly release the vacuum from the sensor. Voltage should drop to less than 1 volt in 3 seconds.
    7. If the sensor does not respond as specified, check the power and ground circuits.
    8. If power and ground circuits are functional, the sensor is faulty.
    EVR Solenoid
    1. Remove the EVR solenoid.
    2. Attempt to lightly blow air into the EVR solenoid.
      1. If air blows through the solenoid, replace the solenoid with a new one.
      2. If air does not pass freely through the solenoid, continue with the test.
    3. Apply battery voltage (approximately 12 volts) and a ground to the EVR solenoid electrical terminals. Attempt to lightly blow air, once again, through the solenoid.
      1. If air does not pass through the solenoid, replace the solenoid with a new one.
      2. If air does not flow through the solenoid, the solenoid is OK.
    4. If the solenoid is functional but the problem still exists, check the power and ground circuits.
    EGR Valve
    1. Install a tachometer on the engine, following the manufacturer's instructions.
    2. Detach the engine wiring harness connector from the Idle Air Control (IAC) solenoid.
    3. Disconnect and plug the vacuum supply hose from the EGR valve.
    4. Start the engine, then apply the parking brake, block the rear wheels and position the transmission in Neutral.
    5. Observe and note the idle speed. NOTE: If the engine will not idle with the IAC solenoid disconnected, provide an air bypass to the engine by slightly opening the throttle plate or by creating an intake vacuum leak. Do not allow the idle speed to exceed typical idle rpm.
    6. Using a hand-held vacuum pump, slowly apply 5-10 in. Hg (17-34 kPa) of vacuum to the EGR valve nipple.
      1. If the idle speed drops more than 100 rpm with the vacuum applied and returns to normal after the vacuum is removed, the EGR valve is OK.
      2. If the idle speed does not drop more than 100 rpm with the vacuum applied and return to normal after the vacuum is removed, inspect the EGR valve for a blockage; clean it if a blockage is found. Replace the EGR valve if no blockage is found, or if cleaning the valve does not remedy the malfunction. ---

    Sep 24, 2010 | 2000 Mercury Cougar

    2 Answers

    Idle fluxuates up and down consistantly


    Check the Idle Control System

    Idle speed is controlled by the Idle Air Control Valve (IACV). The IACV changes the amount of air being bypassed to the intake manifold, in response to electric current controlled by the ECM. When the IACV is activated, the valve opens to maintain proper idle speed.

    Symptom and Subsystems to Check:

    1. Difficult to start engine, when cold--check Fast Idle Thermo Valve.

    2. Fast idle out of spec, when cold:
    a. Check Fast Idle Thermo Valve.
    b. Check IACV.
    c. Check idle adjusting screw (see Section C).

    3. Rough idle:
    a. Check hoses and connections.
    b. Check IACV.

    4. RPM too high, when warm:
    a. Check IACV.
    b. Check Fast Idle Thermo Valve.
    c. Check hoses and connections, check Power Steering Pressure Switch Signal, and check idle adjusting screw.

    5. RPM too low, when warm:
    a. Idle speed is below specified rpm, with no load--check IACV and idle adjusting screw.
    b. Idle speed doesn't increase after initial start up--check IACV.
    c. Idle speed drops in gear (automatic transmission)--check automatic transaxle gear position switch signal.
    d. Idle speed drops when AC is on--check air conditioning signal and IACV.
    e. Idle speed drops when steering wheel is turned--check power steering pressure switch signal and IACV.
    f. Idle speed fluctuates with electrical load--check hoses and connections, IACV, and Alternator FR Signal.

    6. Frequent stalling, while warming up--check IACV and idle adjusting screw.

    7. Frequent stalling, after warming up--check idle adjusting screw and IACV.

    Additional Steps:

    . Check Alternator FR Signal. Have alternator inspected, if idle speed fluctuates with electrical load. The FR signal communicates to the ECM how "hard" the alternator is working to meet the electrical demands of the car, including the battery and any loads which aren't monitored by the ELD. This square-wave signal varies in pulse width, according to the load on the alternator. The ECM places, approximately, 5 reference volts on the wire. The voltage regulator will drop this signal to approximately 1.2 volts, in proportion to alternator load. The ECM compares the electrical load (ELD) signal with the FR (Charging Rate) signal from the alternator and uses that information to set the idle speed and turn the alternator on and off. This helps fuel economy.

    . Clean main ECM ground on thermostat housing.

    . Reset ECM, by removing the 7.5 amp Back Up Fuse, in the under-hood fuse box, for 10 seconds.

    . Replace PCV Valve, cleaning hose with brake cleaner spray.

    . Substitute a known-good ECM. If symptom goes away, replace original ECM.

    Check the ICM (Erratic RPM and PGM-FI System)

    When the engine is cold, the air conditioner compressor is on, the transmission is in gear (automatic transmission only) or the alternator is charging, the ECM controls current to the Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve to maintain correct idle speed. Here's an overview of how the PGM-FI System works.

    Background:

    Various inputs to the ECM are TDC/CKP/CYP Sensor, MAP Sensor, ECT Sensor, IAT Sensor, TP Sensor, HO2S, VSS, BARO Sensor, EGR Valve Lift Sensor, Starter Signal, Alternator FR Signal, Air Conditioning Signal, Automatic Transmission Shift Position Signal, Battery Voltage (Ignition 1) Brake Switch Signal, PSP Switch Signal, ELD, and VTEC Pressure Switch.

    Inputs are received and processed by the ECM's Fuel Injector Timing and Duration, Electronic Idle Control, Other Control Functions, Ignition Timing Control, and ECM Back-up Functions. These are the primary functional areas within the ECM.

    Outputs from the ECM control Fuel Injectors, PGM-FI Main Relay (Fuel Pump), MIL (Check Engine Light), Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve, A/C Compressor Clutch Relay, Ignition Control Module (ICM), EVAP Purge Control Solenoid Valve, HO2S Heater, EGR Control Solenoid Valve, Alternator, Lock-up Solenoid Valve A/B (A/T), VTEC Solenoid Valve, and Interlock Control Unit.

    Idle RPM:

    Once you understand how the PGM-FI system is configured, it's easy to see how the ECM, Idle Air Control Valve, and the Ignition Control Module affect idle rpm. If the ECM's Electronic Idle Control function is not working properly, then it cannot properly control the IAC Valve. Likewise, if the ECM's Ignition Timing Control function is not operating properly, it cannot properly control the ICM (igniter). Obviously, idle rpm will also be affected if there's a problem with the IAC Valve or the ICM. As stated above, the ECM controls current to the Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve to maintain correct idle speed. This cannot happen if the IAC Valve is failing. The same situation exists if the ICM is failing. The ECM will tell the ICM to open and close the primary voltage circuit going to the coil and it won't respond properly. The result will be erratic spark plug firing and erratic rpm.

    Conclusion:

    If you are experiencing erratic idle rpm, try and isolate whether the problem is caused by the ICM (ignitor), IAC Valve, or the ECM. My experience has been that a failing ICM is usually responsible for the problem. Keep in mind that tachometers are connected directly to the ICM. Therefore, a fluctuating tachometer needle is often a dead giveaway. Heat and poor preventive maintenance (causing high secondary voltage to be discharge on internal distributor components) frequently causes the ICM (and coil) to fail. Besides performance, this is another reason why it's important to regularly replace spark plugs, spark plug wires, rotors, and distributor caps. Electricity will always follow the path of least resistance, even if it isn't the intended one. Our job is to ensure the intended path is the path of least resistance.

    Ignitor (ICM) and Coil Replacement:

    1. Disconnect negative battery cable.
    2. Remove hex head machine screws, securing distributor cap to housing, using an 8 mm nut driver.
    3. Move distributor cap and wires off to the side.
    4. Remove machine screw securing rotor to shaft, using a #2 Phillips head screwdriver. It may be necessary to "hit" the starter once or twice, in order to rotate rotor for access to mounting screw.
    5. Remove rotor and leak cover.
    6. Unfasten ignitor wires, remove coil mounting screws, and set coil aside. Note: Removing coil first improves access to igniter.
    7. Unfasten screws securing igniter to housing.
    8. Remove ignitor from distributor and unfasten screws mounting ignitor to heat sink.
    9. Coat back of new ignitor (or old igniter, if reusing) and male connectors with silicone grease. Silicone grease increases heat transfer to heat sink. Failure to apply silicone grease will cause the ignitor to quickly fail.
    10. Mount ignitor to heat sink and reinstall ignitor, igniter terminal wires, coil, coil wires, leak cover, rotor, and distributor cap. Ensure female ignitor terminals fit snugly--crimp with pliers, if necessary.

    AutoZone can test ICMs and coils for free. If you plan to keep the car, I would replace the ICM due the age of your Civic.

    Sep 15, 2010 | 1991 Honda Civic

    3 Answers

    Rough Idle when cold runs seems to run ok hot but still almost stalls when you turn on AC and you are at a stop also noticed that the volt meter reads 9v with the AC and the lights on with the AC and...


    mcdevito75 here, Sounds like a faulty voltage regulator, it"s 1 unit with the alternator, change the alternator, also the alt. supplies juice to the ignition switch, distributor abd plugs, thus a rough idle due to bad alternator.

    Jun 19, 2010 | 1994 GMC Suburban

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