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I have found a large oil leak down the right side of the Left hand rocker shaft housing (the cylinder/piston ram assembly housing) on a David Brown 990 Implematic tractor. Any suggestions?

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: 2003 cts has oil leak

ok, woodhujr,if im not mistaken you had another help request of cranckcase pressure...that problem is causing your leak.
ccny, i have no idea what you are talking about, feel free to enlighten us...
Howard, the best advise i have for you in replacing the valve cover gasket(s) is to get a repair manual for this car/engine and follow the steps as outlined there. I couldnt try to give you step by step instructions in this little box without way oversimplifying.

Posted on Feb 04, 2009

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SOURCE: 1990 HONDA ACCORD DISTRIBUTOR LEAKING OIL INTERNALLY

Lease check and make sure that you replace with the right seal, that alone should have taken care of this problem. However if the valve cover gasket is loose or bad it will cause oil to leak around distributor are but NOT into distributor. This seal can be easily replaced by loosing 4 10mm bolts on top of valve cover. Contact if you need more help Good luck and thanks for using FIX YA

Posted on Mar 26, 2009

  • 3600 Answers

SOURCE: No power steering assist after changing rack and pinion assembly

and?? finish the question does not have power steering now? bleed the system it has air in it and fill the P.S. pump reservoir. More info please.

Posted on May 29, 2009

Molson02536
  • 3854 Answers

SOURCE: Our 2001 Dodge Caravan seems to be leaking oil around drive shaft

Yes it's a bad seal and most likely the side bearing to the trans axle is bad too. Once the bearing has play, it vibrates and causes the oil to leak though the seal. Note: if one side went bad the other side is soon to follow since they have the same amount of miles on them. Might as well change both side. Good luck and hope this helps. Keep an eye on the transmission fluid level, don't want to burn out the transmission.

Posted on Jun 04, 2009

  • 6 Answers

SOURCE: I'm trying to remove the axle nut on my 1999 Dodge

sould be standard left to loosen,, make sure you soak it with PB blaster or Kroil,, I've spun the nuts, before(plow trucks) and had to buy the stub shaft(dealer only $$$) and new U joints,, Keep soaking it!!! Hub bearings are pricey also,, good luck,, You will have to use the jaws to pull it off, and the bolts on the back side, soak those,, I ve separated the hubs before, and then i ve had some come off easy,, Good luck,, total fix $350-$1200 per side. keep soaking, is all i'm saying...

Posted on Dec 24, 2010

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1 Answer

I was quoted $500 to replace all the lifters. Is this a good price?


That is a ridiculously high price to replace lifters on a 4 or 6 cylinder engine. On the Mitsubishi 4 cylinder motor, the only thing that is needed to do is remove the valve cover and remove the rocker rod. (2 rods which hold the rocker assembly.) Next is remove the lifters from the bottoms of the rockers and pop in the new ones. Be sure to soak the new lifters in oil for 24-48hrs prior to install so they are pre-filled before install. Replace the rocker assembly and torque down to specs. replace valve cover and then start the vehicle. Check that there is no loud tapping noise and do not race the engine until the lifters have pumped up with engine oil. You should replace oil and filter for this engine work as well.

Apr 17, 2015 | 1994 Mitsubishi Mighty Max

1 Answer

Timing jeep cherockee


double posted but this time the CAM pops up.
why not read the FSM first. ? linked below.
or alldata.com . log in and read.

here ill do a paste from JUST install PART chapter.
you are doing ALL THAT book free, REALLY?
https://www.techauthority.com/en-US/Pages/Home.aspx

  1. Using a vise, lightly compress the secondary chain tensioner piston until the piston step is flush with the tensioner body. Using a pin or suitable tool, release ratchet pawl by pulling pawl back against spring force through access hole on side of tensioner.
  2. While continuing to hold pawl back, Push ratchet device to approximately 2 mm from the tensioner body. Install Special Tool 8514 lock pin into hole on front of tensioner. Slowly open vise to transfer piston spring force to lock pin.
  3. Position primary chain tensioner over oil pump and insert bolts into lower two holes on tensioner bracket. Tighten bolts to 250 inch lbs. (28 Nm).
  4. Install right side chain tensioner arm. Install Torx®bolt. Tighten Torx®bolt to 250 inch lbs. (28 Nm). CAUTION The silver bolts retain the guides to the cylinder heads and the black bolts retain the guides to the engine block.
  5. Install the left side chain guide. Tighten the bolts to 250 inch lbs. (28 Nm).
  6. Install left side chain tensioner arm, and Torx®bolt. Tighten Torx®bolt to 250 inch lbs. (28 Nm).
  7. Install the right side chain guide. Tighten the bolts to 250 inch lbs. (28 Nm).
  8. Install both secondary chains onto the idler sprocket. Align two plated links on the secondary chains to be visible through the two lower openings on the idler sprocket (4 o'clock and 8 o'clock). Once the secondary timing chains are installed, position special tool 8429 to hold chains in place for installation.
  9. Align primary chain double plated links with the timing mark at 12 o'clock on the idler sprocket.
  10. Align the primary chain single plated link with the timing mark at 6 o'clock on the crankshaft sprocket.
  11. Lubricate idler shaft and bushings with clean engine oil. NOTE The idler sprocket must be timed to the counterbalance shaft drive gear before the idler sprocket is fully seated.
  12. Install all chains, crankshaft sprocket, and idler sprocket as an assembly . After guiding both secondary chains through the block and cylinder head openings, affix chains with a elastic strap or equivalent. This will maintain tension on chains to aid in installation. Align the timing mark on the idler sprocket gear to the timing mark on the counterbalance shaft drive gear, then seat idler sprocket fully . Before installing idler sprocket bolt, lubricate washer with oil, and tighten idler sprocket assembly retaining bolt to 25 ft. lbs. (34 Nm). NOTE It will be necessary to slightly rotate camshafts for sprocket installation.
  13. Align left camshaft sprocket "L" dot to plated link on chain.
  14. Align right camshaft sprocket "R" dot to plated link on chain. CAUTION Remove excess oil from the camshaft sprocket bolt. Failure to do so can result in over torque of bolt resulting in bolt failure.
  15. Remove Special Tool 8429, then attach both sprockets to camshafts. Remove excess oil from bolts, then Install sprocket bolts, but do not tighten at this time.
  16. Verify that all plated links are aligned with the marks on all sprockets and the "V6" marks on camshaft sprockets are at the 12 o'clock position. CAUTION Ensure the plate between the left secondary chain tensioner and block is correctly installed.
  17. Install both secondary chain tensioners. Tighten bolts to 250 inch lbs. (28 Nm). NOTE Left and right secondary chain tensioners are not common.
  18. Remove all locking pins from tensioners. CAUTION After pulling locking pins out of each tensioner, DO NOT manually extend the tensioner(s) ratchet. Doing so will over tension the chains, resulting in noise and/or high timing chain loads.
  19. Using Special Tool 6958, Spanner with Adaptor Pins 8346, tighten left and right . camshaft sprocket bolts to 90 ft. lbs. (122 Nm).
  20. Rotate engine two full revolutions. Verify timing marks are at the follow locations: ² primary chain idler sprocket dot is at 12 o'clock ² primary chain crankshaft sprocket dot is at 6 o'clock ² secondary chain camshaft sprockets "V6" marks are at 12 o'clock ² counter balancer shaft drive gear dot is aligned to the idler sprocket gear dot.
  21. Lubricate all three chains with engine oil.
  22. After installing all chains, it is recommended that the idler gear end play be checked. The end play must be within mm 0.004-0.010 inches (0.10-0.25). If not within specification, the idler gear must be replaced.
  23. Install timing chain cover and crankshaft damper.
  24. Install cylinder head covers. NOTE Before installing threaded plug in right cylinder head, the plug must be coated with sealant to prevent leaks.
  25. Coat the large threaded access plug with Mopar® Thread Sealant with Teflon, then install into the right cylinder head and tighten to 60 ft. lbs. (81 Nm).
  26. Install the oil fill housing.
  27. Install access plug in left cylinder head.
  28. Install power steering pump.
  29. Fill cooling system.
  30. Connect negative cable to battery.

Dec 07, 2014 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to wire trailer plug


hope this helps


6 pin socket

w1s.jpg

w1p.jpg

6 pin plug


7 pin socket

w2s.jpg

w2p.jpg

7 pin plug


5 pin socket

w3s.jpg

w3p.jpg

5 pin plug



7 pin socket

w4s.jpg

w4p.jpg

7 pin plug



7 pin socket

w5s.jpg

w5p.jpg

7 pin plug



7 pin socket

w6.jpg

7 pin plug





12 pin socket

w7.jpg

12 pin plug



small 6 pin round plug & socket

1 tail, clearance - brown

2 left hand turn - yellow

3 right hand turn - green

4 stop - red

5 electric brakes - blue

6 earth - white



small 7 pin round plug & socket

1 left hand turn - yellow

2 reverse - black

3 earth - white

4 right hand turn - green

5 electric brakes - blue

6 stop - red

7 tail, clearance, side markers - brown

roundskt.jpg round socket

large 5 pin round plug & socket

2 left hand turn - yellow

3 earth - white

5 right hand turn - green

6 stop - red

7 tail, clearance, side markers - brown



large 7 pin round plug & socket

1 left hand turn - yellow

2 reverse - black

3 earth - white

4 right hand turn - green

5 electric brakes - blue

6 stop - red

7 tail, clearance, side markers - brown



7 pin round heavy duty plug & socket

1 earth - white

2 left hand rear , clearance and marker - black

3 left hand turn - yellow

4 stop - red

5 right hand turn - green

6 right hand rear , clearance and marker - brown

7 reverse/auxilary - blue



7 pin flat plug & socket

1 left hand turn - yellow

2 reverse - black

3 earth - white

4 right hand turn - green

5 electric brakes - blue

6 stop - red

7 tail, clearance, side markers - brown


7_flatsocket.jpg flat socket

12 pin flat plug & socket

1 left hand turn - yellow

2 reverse - black

3 earth - white

4 right hand turn - green

5 electric brakes - blue

6 stop - red

7 tail, clearance, side markers - brown

8 battery supply - orange

9 auxiliaries - pink

10 earth - white

11 rear fog lamp - grey

12 auxiliaries - violet


Feb 02, 2013 | 2004 Toyota RAV4

1 Answer

Timing chain 96 maxima broke


Check your owner's manual for the recommended mileage for replacing your timing chain. Replacement for a Nissan Maxima is 60,000 miles.2 Locate the timing chain. Replace it if the automatic chain adjuster (also known as the tensioner) is damaged or worn.3 Release the pressure in the fuel system, drain the cooling system and disengage the negative battery cable. 4 Undo the upper radiator hose, engine drive belts, power steering pulley and pump with bracket, air duct, passenger front wheel and engine side and undercovers, front exhaust pipe, cylinder head front mounting bracket and head cover, rocker cover, distributor and distributor cap and spark plugs.5 Take off the intake manifold support and move the No. 1 piston at "Top Dead Center" (TDC) of the compression stroke.6 Disconnect the cylinder head front cover, water pump pulley, thermostat housing, upper and lower tensioner and slack side timing chain guide, idler sprocket bolt, camshaft sprocket bolts, sprockets, mounting caps and camshafts. 7 Disengage the cylinder head with the manifolds, idler sprocket shaft, upper timing chain, center crossmember, oil pan and strainer assembly, crankshaft pulley, engine front mount and bracket and the front timing cover. Remove the oil seal and unfasten the timing chain cover, idler and crankshaft sprockets and the oil pump drive spacer. 8 Unfasten the timing chain guide. install Your Timing Chain 1 Grease the oil seal lip with engine oil and place it in the front cover. Verify that the No. 1 piston is at "Top Dead Center" (TDC) of the compression stroke. 2 Reconnect the crankshaft sprocket (marks should point toward the engine's front), oil pump drive spacer and timing chain guide and the lower timing chain. Line up all mating marks.3 Hook up the crankshaft sprocket and pulley, lower timing chain, front cover assembly, engine mount and front mounting bracket, oil strainer and pan assembly and center crossmember.4 Reattach the upper timing chain, idler sprocket (to the back side), cylinder head assembly, idler sprocket bolt and exhaust and intake camshafts. Place the intake camshaft knock pin at 9 o'clock and the exhaust pin at noon. Connect the camshaft bearing caps and distributor brackets and secure all mounting bolts.5 Eliminate any old material from the pan and cylinder block mounting surfaces. Rub on a 3.5 to 4.5mm bead of liquid gasket over the oil pan and cylinder block.6 Attach the upper timing chain to the idler sprockets and secure the cylinder head bolts.7 Refill the cooling system. Hook up the negative battery cable and any other disconnected items. Start the engine and look for leaks.

Oct 14, 2011 | 1996 Nissan Maxima

1 Answer

P 2647"A" Rocker Arm Actuator


Your going to need a air pressure regulator or better yet if the ECM found fault price it and replace it
  1. Start the engine, and let it run for 5 minutes, then turn the ignition switch to LOCK (0).
  2. Remove the cylinder head cover.
  3. Set the No. 1 piston at top dead center (TDC).
  4. Move the intake secondary rocker arm A for the No. 1 cylinder. The secondary rocker arm A should move independently of the secondary rocker arm B.
    1. If the intake secondary rocker arm A moves freely, go to step 5.
    2. If the intake secondary rocker arm A does not move, remove the secondary rocker arms as an assembly, then check that the pistons in the secondary rocker arms move smoothly. If any rocker arm needs replacing, replace the secondary rocker arms as an assembly, then retest.
    3. Repeat step 4 on the remaining intake secondary rocker arms with each piston at TDC. When all the secondary rocker arms pass the test, go to step 6.
    4. Check that the air pressure on the shop air compressor gauge indicates over 400 kPa (4.0 kgf/cm2, 57 psi).
    5. Inspect the valve clearance.
    6. Install a 10 x 1.0 mm adapter to the inspection hole, then connect the air pressure regulator
  5. With the specified air pressure applied, move the intake secondary rocker arm A for the No. 1 cylinder. The secondary rocker arm A and secondary rocker arm B should move together. If the intake secondary rocker arm A does not move, remove the secondary rocker arms as an assembly, and check that the pistons in the secondary rocker arms move smoothly. If any rocker arm needs replacing, replace the secondary rocker arms as an assembly, then retest.
  6. cansmo_32.gif
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Aug 23, 2011 | Honda Accord Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The engine has blown. I need to replace it or change pistons and rings. How difficult is it to change pistons and rings?


It can be time consuming and the end result may not be desirable if you haven't done it before.
--- The following is just a sample of what to do once the engine is torn down: Pistons and Connecting Rods
  1. Before installing the piston/connecting rod assembly, oil the pistons, piston rings and the cylinder walls with light engine oil. Install connecting rod bolt protectors or rubber hose onto the connecting rod bolts/studs. Also perform the following:
    1. Select the proper ring set for the size cylinder bore.
    2. Position the ring in the bore in which it is going to be used.
    3. Push the ring down into the bore area where normal ring wear is not encountered.
    4. Use the head of the piston to position the ring in the bore so that the ring is square with the cylinder wall. Use caution to avoid damage to the ring or cylinder bore.
    5. Measure the gap between the ends of the ring with a feeler gauge. Ring gap in a worn cylinder is normally greater than specification. If the ring gap is greater than the specified limits, try an oversize ring set. Fig. 5: Checking the piston ring-to-ring groove side clearance using the ring and a feeler gauge tccs3923.gif

    6. Check the ring side clearance of the compression rings with a feeler gauge inserted between the ring and its lower land according to specification. The gauge should slide freely around the entire ring circumference without binding. Any wear that occurs will form a step at the inner portion of the lower land. If the lower lands have high steps, the piston should be replaced. Fig. 6: The notch on the side of the bearing cap matches the tang on the bearing insert tccs3917.gif

  2. Unless new pistons are installed, be sure to install the pistons in the cylinders from which they were removed. The numbers on the connecting rod and bearing cap must be on the same side when installed in the cylinder bore. If a connecting rod is ever transposed from one engine or cylinder to another, new bearings should be fitted and the connecting rod should be numbered to correspond with the new cylinder number. The notch on the piston head goes toward the front of the engine.
  3. Install all of the rod bearing inserts into the rods and caps. Fig. 7: Most rings are marked to show which side of the ring should face up when installed to the piston tccs3222.gif

  4. Install the rings to the pistons. Install the oil control ring first, then the second compression ring and finally the top compression ring. Use a piston ring expander tool to aid in installation and to help reduce the chance of breakage. Fig. 8: Install the piston and rod assembly into the block using a ring compressor and the handle of a hammer tccs3914.gif

  5. Make sure the ring gaps are properly spaced around the circumference of the piston. Fit a piston ring compressor around the piston and slide the piston and connecting rod assembly down into the cylinder bore, pushing it in with the wooden hammer handle. Push the piston down until it is only slightly below the top of the cylinder bore. Guide the connecting rod onto the crankshaft bearing journal carefully, to avoid damaging the crankshaft.
  6. Check the bearing clearance of all the rod bearings, fitting them to the crankshaft bearing journals. Follow the procedure in the crankshaft installation above.
  7. After the bearings have been fitted, apply a light coating of assembly oil to the journals and bearings.
  8. Turn the crankshaft until the appropriate bearing journal is at the bottom of its stroke, then push the piston assembly all the way down until the connecting rod bearing seats on the crankshaft journal. Be careful not to allow the bearing cap screws to strike the crankshaft bearing journals and damage them.
  9. After the piston and connecting rod assemblies have been installed, check the connecting rod side clearance on each crankshaft journal.
  10. Prime and install the oil pump and the oil pump intake tube.
  11. Install the auxiliary/balance shaft(s)/assembly(ies).
OHV Engines CAMSHAFT, LIFTERS AND TIMING ASSEMBLY
  1. Install the camshaft.
  2. Install the lifters/followers into their bores.
  3. Install the timing gears/chain assembly.
CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Assemble the rest of the valve train (pushrods and rocker arms and/or shafts).
OHC Engines CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Install the timing sprockets/gears and the belt/chain assemblies.
Engine Covers and Components Install the timing cover(s) and oil pan. Refer to your notes and drawings made prior to disassembly and install all of the components that were removed. Install the engine into the vehicle. Engine Start-up and Break-in STARTING THE ENGINE Now that the engine is installed and every wire and hose is properly connected, go back and double check that all coolant and vacuum hoses are connected. Check that your oil drain plug is installed and properly tightened. If not already done, install a new oil filter onto the engine. Fill the crankcase with the proper amount and grade of engine oil. Fill the cooling system with a 50/50 mixture of coolant/water.
  1. Connect the vehicle battery.
  2. Start the engine. Keep your eye on your oil pressure indicator; if it does not indicate oil pressure within 10 seconds of starting, turn the vehicle OFF. WARNING
    Damage to the engine can result if it is allowed to run with no oil pressure. Check the engine oil level to make sure that it is full. Check for any leaks and if found, repair the leaks before continuing. If there is still no indication of oil pressure, you may need to prime the system.
  3. Confirm that there are no fluid leaks (oil or other).
  4. Allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature (the upper radiator hose will be hot to the touch).
  5. At this point any necessary checks or adjustments can be performed, such as ignition timing.
  6. Install any remaining components or body panels which were removed. prev.gif next.gif

Oct 17, 2010 | 1995 Ford Thunderbird

1 Answer

I need to know how to set the timing belt on a 1995 nissan 3.0 4x4 kingcab truck


I'm going to copy the procedure from Autozone.com below. I've never seen such a complicated way of getting the tension right, but better to follow their instructions, I guess. Note that they ask you to loosen the rocker shafts, but they never tell you to put them back. I will add that.

c42df83.gif
To install:

6. Remove both cylinder head covers and loosen all rocker arm shaft retaining bolts.

The rocker arm shaft bolts MUST be loosened so that the correct belt tension can be obtained.
  1. Install the tensioner and the return spring. Using a hexagon wrench, turn the tensioner clockwise, then temporarily tighten the locknut.
  2. Make sure that the timing belt is clean and free from oil or water, before installation.
  3. Install the timing belt. Align the white lines on the belt with the punchmarks on the camshaft and crankshaft sprockets. Be sure to have the arrow on the timing belt pointing toward the front belt covers.
A good way (although rather tedious) to check for proper timing belt installation is to count the number of belt teeth between the timing marks. There are 133 teeth on the belt; there should be 40 teeth between the timing marks on the left and right-side camshaft sprockets, and 43 teeth between the timing marks on the left-side camshaft sprocket and the crankshaft sprocket.
  1. While keeping the tensioner steady, loosen the locknut with a hexagon wrench.
  2. Turn the tension approximately 70-80 degrees clockwise with the wrench, then tighten the locknut.
  3. Turn the crankshaft in a clockwise direction several times, then slowly set the No. 1 piston to TDC of the compression stroke.
  4. Apply 22 lbs. (10 kg) of pressure (push it in) to the center span of the timing belt between the right-side camshaft sprocket and the tensioner pulley, then loosen the tensioner locknut.
  5. Using a 0.0138 in. (0.35mm) feeler gauge (the actual width of the blade must be 1/2 in. or 12.7mm thick), positioned as shown in the illustration, slowly turn the crankshaft clockwise. The timing belt should move approximately 2 1/2 teeth. Tighten the tensioner locknut, then turn the crankshaft slightly and remove the feeler gauge.
  6. Slowly rotate the crankshaft clockwise several more times , then set the No. 1 piston to TDC of the compression stroke; recheck all alignment marks.
  7. Install the upper and lower timing belt covers.
  8. Connect the negative battery cable.

710acc3.jpg



3643433.jpg

6e81a14.jpg

c814a96.gif

When installing the rocker arm shafts, be certain that they are installed in their original positions.
  1. Make sure the camshaft knock pin is at the top of the camshaft and that the lobe is not in the lifted position. If servicing the left-side cylinder head, set the No. 1 piston at TDC of its compression stroke, then tighten the rocker shaft bolts for cylinder No. 2, 4 and 6 cylinders. If servicing the right-side cylinder head, set the No. 4 piston at TDC of its compression stroke and tighten the rocker shaft bolts for cylinder No. 1, 3 and 5 cylinder rocker shaft bolts. Tighten all bolts gradually, in two or three stages, to 13-16 ft. lbs. (18-22 Nm).
  2. Install the cylinder head cover(s).

Sep 12, 2010 | 1995 Nissan King Cab

1 Answer

I replaced the lifters in my 2000 galant 2.4 L and i need to know what to torque the rocker arm shafts to.


1.5 and 1.8 engines:
* Install the rocker arm and shaft assemblies. Tighten the rocker arm shaft retainer bolts to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm).

* Check valve adjustment and install the valve cover. Tighten the valve cover bolts to 16 inch lbs. (1.8 Nm) for the 1.5L engine or to 29 inch lbs. (3.3 Nm) for the 1.8L engine.



2.0 engine
* Lubricate the rocker shaft with clean engine oil and install the rockers and springs in their proper places.

* Install the rocker shaft assemblies on the engine. Tighten the bolts gradually and evenly to 21-25 ft. lbs. (29-35 Nm).



2.4 engine

fa2bc50.jpg

Fig. Rocker arm shafts and components-2.4L engine



* Fit the rocker shaft springs from above and position them so that they are at right angles to the plug side. Install the rocker springs before installing the exhaust side rocker shaft and rocker arm assembly.

* Install the exhaust side rocker shaft assembly in the engine. Tighten the rocker shaft mounting bolts gradually and evenly to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm).
* Remove the lash adjuster retaining tools.
* Install the rocker cover and tighten the mounting bolts to 30 inch lbs. (3 Nm).

* Reinstall the spark plug wires to the spark plugs.



Hope helps.

Sep 06, 2010 | Mitsubishi Galant Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

How do I get the rear brake cylinder depress back in when putting on new brakes.


If it does not push back with a c-clamp,then it will turn to go back in,the right side,and the left side will turn either left,or right hand to go back in,depending on witch side you are working on.

Nov 29, 2009 | 2004 Ford Freestar

2 Answers

There is a ticking sound coming from teh drivers side of the motor top end when i start it up when i drive it goes away but its there when i start it or ideling


In order to give you a solution to your problem, I need to explain a little bit about the valve train in your engine, the engine itself, and how it works.

1.You have an Internal Combustion engine. It is a Four Stroke engine. The engine has a Cylinder Block with cylinders inside. There is a piston for each cylinder which goes up, and down. The piston/s are connected to a crankshaft. The crankshaft turns the transmission, which in turn turns the driveshaft, to the rear differential. The rear differential has axles, which the rear wheels are bolted to. The four strokes are , Intake Stroke, Compression Stroke, Combustion Stroke, and Exhaust Stroke.

The piston goes down the cylinder drawing the fuel/air mixture in. (Intake Stroke) The Intake valve opens. The piston comes back up the cylinder, and Compresses the fuel/air mixture. (Compression Stroke) Both the Intake and Exhaust valve are closed. The spark plug fires igniting the fuel/air mixture, and shoves the piston down. (Combustion Stroke) Finally the Exhaust valve opens, and expels the burnt gases. (Exhaust Stroke)
This page on Wikipedia.org, may help explain the process. The third 'photo' down on the right is an animation showing the process.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_combustion_engine
The animation shows an engine with an Overhead Camshaft. Your camshaft is located in the Cylinder Block, and not in the Cylinder Head, as shown.

2.Your Camshaft is a shaft with egg shaped lobes on it. As the tip of the egg shape comes to the top, it pushes up on a Hydraulic Lifter. This lifter in turn pushes up on a Pushrod, which pushes up on a Rocker Arm. The Rocker Arm in turn pushes down on either the Intake Valve, or the Exhaust Valve, opening them.

A Rocker Arm is shaped a lot like a See-saw. Just like the one's at a child's playground. As one side goes up, the other side comes down. The Pushrod pushes up on one side of the Rocker Arm, and the other side of the Rocker Arm pushes down on the valve, opening it.

A Hydraulic Lifter is a small cylinder that has a piston in it. Oil goes through a tiny hole in the side of the lifter, and this keeps the piston in a certain position. (That's why this lifter is named 'Hydraulic', because it uses oil inside) The Pushrod rests on this piston. The hydraulic action of the Hydraulic Lifter, keeps slack out of the valve train. The pushrod to rocker arm distance, and the rocker arm to valve distance.

What you are hearing, is a clicking sound from clearance being created, in-between the pushrod to rocker arm, and/or rocker arm to valve stem. A metal to metal clicking sound.

Solution? Depends on how mechanically inclined you are, or you may want to refer this job to an auto repair shop. The valve cover needs to be removed, and the nut on each rocker arm needs to be adjusted. Adjusting the nut down, (Clockwise), pushes the rocker arm down on the rocker arm stud, a little. This removes the slack, and makes things nice, and quiet again. Your engine will also run better, and you'll get better gas mileage.

DON'T do this, or have it down, and eventually the slack that is in there will increase. This will break parts! There IS a technique in doing this. If you know of someone who is good at adjusting valves, they can do it. They MUST be good however. If you adjust the Rocker Arm Nut too far down, you will lose power, and the exhaust valve face will burn. Not far enough down, and you get the clicking sound you hear now. About 1/4 turn down, to 1/2 turn down, should do it.

Jul 26, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

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