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Engine Overheating Fan Unit - Cars & Trucks

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You have to be more specific. The engine overheating is a lot different than a fan overheating

Posted on May 16, 2017

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-What about...?

Good luck

Mai

Posted on May 16, 2017

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Why is the temperature light keep coming on and the gauge keep going up and down?


Temperature Warning Light is on Inspection Service How this system works: With the exception of older, air-cooled vehicles, cars rely on a liquid called coolant (or antifreeze) to keep the engine at an optimal temperature. Coolant is a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and it circulates around the engine block and absorbs excess heat, which keeps the engine from overheating. The coolant converts that heat to air in the radiator, and then the air is emitted, at which time the coolant is ready to absorb more heat. Without coolant, the engine would quickly ruin itself with its own heat production. Common reasons for this to happen:
  • Coolant is low or weak: The most common culprit when an engine overheats is low or weak coolant. If your car doesn't have enough coolant, then it can't absorb enough heat. While your car will naturally lose small amounts of coolant over the years, a leak is the most likely cause of low coolant levels.The proper ratio of coolant to water can also get distorted, resulting in a problem. Too little or even too much antifreeze can dramatically lower the boiling point of the coolant. A proper ratio of antifreeze to water is 50/50 to 60/40, depending on the vehicle.
  • Broken radiator fan shroud: The radiator fan shroud directs the airflow across the radiator so the air can absorb the coolant's heat. When the fan shroud breaks or becomes dislodged, air fails to enter the radiator, and the coolant will no longer have a place to direct the transfer of heat.
  • Broken or missing air dam: Along with the shroud, some vehicles have an air dam (or deflector) underneath the vehicle. If this is broken or missing then the air can pass underneath the vehicle but not also through the radiator, which will cause overheating. These air dams are essential in newer vehicles, as they force the air through the fan shroud.
  • Faulty coolant temperature sensor: The temperature sensor takes constant readings of the coolant temperature and sends that information to the engine control unit. Based on the temperature of the coolant, the engine control unit adjusts the ignition timing, the fuel injector pulse, and the operation of the electric cooling fan.
  • Bad water pump: The water pump is responsible for keeping the coolant cycling throughout the engine. After the coolant transfers its heat energy to the air, the water pump recirculates it around the engine so that it can absorb more heat. The most common water pump problems are a leaking pump, bad bearings, or an impeller that has rotted away due to a low coolant ratio.
  • Stuck thermostat: The thermostat acts as a dam for the coolant. When the engine first turns on, and it is still cold, the thermostat keeps the coolant from circulating, which allows the engine to warm up as quickly as possible. Once the engine has reached its operating temperature, the thermostat opens and allows the coolant to circulate. A stuck thermometer may stay permanently sealed and therefore keep the coolant from reaching the engine block.
  • The thermostat may also stick open. This will not usually result in overheating, but it will waste gas.
  • Broken engine cooling fan: The engine has a cooling fan that is deployed when the coolant needs some extra help. When the coolant temperature sensor notices that the coolant temperature is getting too high, the engine control unit (on newer vehicles) will initiate the cooling fan to reduce the temperature.
  • Broken thermostatic fan clutch: Older vehicles use a thermostatic fan clutch to engage the engine cooling fan, which is mounted to the fan blades. The fan clutch uses a bi-metallic spring that tightens when the temperature increases. This acts as a "high speed" option for the fan, and when engaged, it draws more air across the radiator.
  • Blown head gasket: The head gaskets sit between the engine block and the cylinder heads, and keep coolant from entering the engine's oil and combustion chamber. When a gasket blows and coolant seeps in, the issue is not only that the engine will overheat, but also that damage may be done to the catalytic converter and oxygen sensors due to contamination from the coolant. What to expect: A top-rated mobile mechanic will come to your home or office to determine the cause of the temperature warning light turning on and the source of the overheating, and will then provide a detailed inspection report that includes the scope and cost of the necessary repairs. How important is this service? An overheating engine is extremely dangerous. It is not safe to drive a vehicle with an overheating engine, or you may ruin the engine completely and put yourself at risk. As soon as you notice the light come on, pull over. If there is no place to safely pull over, turn off your radio and other electrical units, and turn your heat on high (this will funnel some of the hot engine air into the cabin). As soon as you can safely pull over, do so, and then book one of our mechanics to perform an inspection.

Sep 30, 2016 | 2008 Pontiac G6

1 Answer

Not cooling,has new impeller and thermostate


Steve, there's many causes of overheating. You say you have a new water pump and thermostat, so it's obviously not those at fault.

Just a question ... you say your car is not cooling, but is it actually overheating? A faulty temperature sender unit (it screws into the engine block, usually..) can give an incorrect reading on your gauge.

If it is overheating - steam/you can feel the excess heat - is your radiator fan kicking in? Is your car overheating as soon as you drive it? Or overheating when stuck in traffic .. and the fan isn't kicking in..?

Other things that cause overheating which spring to mind include a blocked radiator and/or a collapsed radiator hose.

Hot coolant enters your radiator via the TOP hose and cools as it goes down the radiator, then back into the engine via the bottom hose. Check both top and bottom hose after the engine has warmed - sometimes a hose can become 'flat' and blocked.

Another thing that causes overheating is a burnt head gasket/cylinder head problem.

Switch the engine on and look at your coolant bottle - a continuous 'bubbling' indicates that exhaust gases are finding their way (via a burnt head gasket) into the cooling system.

Any oil in the coolant bottle also indicates cylinder head problems. Also check the oil dipstick. If coolant (because of a defective head gasket/head) has found its way into the oil system the oil on your dipstick may appear a creamy/greyish sludge.

May 21, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine overheating


Its possibke tat they are working out of range or some problem with the temperature sensor sending unit. Also check coolant level.

Jun 23, 2012 | Vauxhall Astra Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Car running hot


Check fan relay and wire connections; if they are ok, and the fan work if you jump directly, could be the temperature sending unit, engine temperature sensor out of range or thermostat stuck. Stop the car, could overheating and damage other components and engine itself.

Jun 21, 2012 | 1995 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Fans not working/Overheating


Probably the temperature sending unit...if not that the relays...they should be relatively cheap and easy to replace...

Mar 31, 2017 | 1989 Toyota Camry

2 Answers

The electric radiator fan runs after truck is shut off. Will turn off after 30-40 min. Is this normal?


no it is not normal....have a repair shop check the coolant fan sending unit or the coolant fan relay...a bad sending unit maybe sending a false overheating signal to the fan causeing it to stay on or the on off fan relay maybe sticking on..an make sure the jeep is not actually running hot the temp guage maybe reading the wrong temp

Jul 15, 2011 | 1998 Jeep Cherokee

2 Answers

Engine over heated stalled out and will not start


FIRST OF ALL CHECK ENGINE COOLANT LEVEL IF LOW YOU NEED ADD MORE COOLANT CHECK FOR LEAKING TOP AND BOTTOM RADIATOR HOSES, CHECK RADIATOR FOR LEAKS. IF YOU DID NOT LOSE MUCH COOLANT THERMOSTAT COULD BE STUCK CLOSED.WHEN ADD COOLANT CRANK VECHICLE AGAIN CHECK BOTH RADIATOR HOSES THEY BOTH SHOULD BE HOT. IF TOP RADIATOR HOSE GOING TO ENGINE BLOCK COLD AND BOTTOM RADIATOR HOSE COLD WARM THE THERMOSTAT IS STUCK CLOSED. IF ENGINE OVERHEATING WHILE SITTING IN LONG TRAFFIC LINE YOU COULD HAVE FAULTY ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR.IT CONTROLS COOLANT FAN AT SET TEMPERATURE.IF COOLANTS FAN NOT RUNNING WHEN OVERHEATING.EITHER COOLANT FAN FUSE RELAY FAULTY OR FAN MOTOR DEFECTIVE OR FAN MOTOR WIRING CONNECTOR HAVE BROKE WIRES.IF COOLANT FAN IS RUNNING WHILE ENGINE OVERHEATING CHECK CRANK OIL AT OIL DIP STICK OIL LOOKS LIKE MILK SHAKE YOU HAVE BLOWED HEAD GASKET. WARNING DONT KEEP DRIVING VECHICLE WHEN ENGINE OVERHEATING YOU WILL CAUSE ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION DAMAGE.

Jun 19, 2011 | 2002 Kia Sedona

1 Answer

My 2000 pontiac grand prix, the Engine temp heats up when at idle, returns to normal temp when at high speed and now it is almost at the overheating level whether i'm ideling or driving, Is it the...


The initial problem points to the radiator fan(s) not running at any road speed. Check the fan(s) for noise-free turning by hand. Check fan fuse and relay (swap with similar relay). Turn on the air conditioner which should immediately turn on the fan(s). Overheating while driving could very well be the thermostat--you will need to drain the cooling system before replacing the unit. Blow out the radiator core with compressed air from the engine side to remove bugs and other debris first. Hope this helps!

Oct 02, 2010 | 2000 Pontiac Grand Prix

2 Answers

2003 Protege 5 overheating on long runs (> 20 min). Overheated today while driving at interstate speeds for > 15 min. Lost the coolant. Refilled with coolant. Return drive maintained normal engine...


Sounds like you have coolant leak if you are loosing coolant or a bad thermostat. I would replace the thermostat, they run about $10. The other fan is an aux fan and will only run when the a/c unit is on.

Mar 01, 2010 | 2003 Mazda Protege

3 Answers

2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee- fan that sits closest to radiator


Have you tested the fan sending unit on the engine? disconnect that and if the fan runs (Key on) that is most likely the problem.

Oct 17, 2008 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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