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2003 Honda civic p1706 code.will this cause transmission to be sluggish during takeoff?

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6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

bbtoast
  • 319 Answers

SOURCE: 2003 Honda Civic -LX Timing belt

90000 Miles on the Timing Belt. Do not let this go! A timing belt failure can cause internal engine problems.

Should cost around 200 or so, depending upon your local labor rates.

Good Luck!

Brian

Posted on Jun 17, 2008

SOURCE: Air condition is not cooling my car is Honda Civic 2003

Realize that auto AC is basically a refrigerator in a weird layout. It's designed to move heat from one place (the inside of your car) to some other place (the outdoors). While a complete discussion of every specific model and component is well outside the scope of this article, this should give you a start on figuring out what the problem might be and either fixing it yourself or talking intelligently to someone you can pay to fix it.Become familiar with the major components to auto air conditioning:
the compressor, which compresses and circulates the refrigerant in the system the refrigerant, (on modern cars, usually a substance called R-134a older cars have r-12 freon which is becoming increasingly more expensive and hard to find, and also requires a license to handle) which carries the heat the condenser, which changes the phase of the refrigerant and expels heat removed from the car the expansion valve (or orifice tube in some vehicles), which is somewhat of a nozzle and functions to similtaneously drop the pressure of the refrigerant liquid, meter its flow, and atomize it
the evaporator, which transfers heat to the refrigerant from the air blown across it, cooling your car
the receiver/dryer, which functions as a filter for the refrigerant/oil, removing moisture and other contaminants Understand the air conditioning process: The compressor puts the refrigerant under pressure and sends it to the condensing coils. In your car, these coils are generally in front of the radiator. Compressing a gas makes it quite hot. In the condenser, this added heat and the heat the refrigerant picked up in the evaporator is expelled to the air flowing across it from outside the car. When the refrigerant is cooled to its saturation temperature, it will change phase from a gas back into a liquid (this gives off a bundle of heat known as the "latent heat of vaporization"). The liquid then passes through the expansion valve to the evaporator, the coils inside of your car, where it loses pressure that was added to it in the compressor. This causes some of the liquid to change to a low-pressure gas as it cools the remaining liquid. This two-phase mixture enters the evaporator, and the liquid portion of the refrigerant absorbs the heat from the air across the coil and evaporates. Your car's blower circulates air across the cold evaporator and into the interior. The refrigerant goes back through the cycle again and again. Check to see if all the R-134a leaks out (meaning there's nothing in the loop to carry away heat). Leaks are easy to spot but not easy to fix without pulling things apart. Most auto-supply stores carry a fluorescent dye that can be added to the system to check for leaks, and it will have instructions for use on the can. If there's a bad enough leak, the system will have no pressure in it at all. Find one of the valve-stem-looking things and CAREFULLY (eye protection recommended) poke a pen in there to try to valve off pressure, and if there IS none, that's the problem. Make sure the compressor is turning. Start the car, turn on the AC and look under the hood. The AC compressor is generally a pumplike thing off to one side with large rubber and steel hoses going to it. It will not have a filler cap on it, but will often have one or two things that look like the valve stems on a bike tire. The pulley on the front of the compressor exists as an outer pulley and an inner hub which turns when an electric clutch is engaged. If the AC is on and the blower is on, but the center of the pulley is not turning, then the compressor's clutch is not engaging. This could be a bad fuse, a wiring problem, a broken AC switch in your dash, or the system could be low on refrigerant (most systems have a low-pressure safety cutout that will disable the compressor if there isn't enough refrigerant in the system). Look for other things that can go wrong: bad switches, bad fuses, broken wires, broken fan belt (preventing the pump from turning), or seal failure inside the compressor. Feel for any cooling at all. If the system cools, but not much, it could just be low pressure, and you can top up the refrigerant. Most auto-supply stores will have a kit to refill a system, and it will come with instructions. Do not overfill! Adding more than the recommended amount of refrigerant will NOT improve performance but actually will decrease performance. In fact, the more expensive automated equipment found at nicer shops actually monitors cooling performance real-time as it adds refrigerant, and when the performance begins to decrease it removes refrigerant until the performance peaks again.

Posted on Apr 21, 2009

  • 208 Answers

SOURCE: how to remove the radio in a honda civic 2003

go to an auto parts store and purchase a repair manual it will clearly tell you how to remove the radio . read and understand the directions carefully if you have questions ask the partscarrier they often can assist you

Posted on Jun 22, 2009

  • 162 Answers

SOURCE: 2003 honda civic how to remove door panel

Step one Look at the inside door handle. Behind it you should see a little cover, You pop that off and there will be 2 phillips head screws behind it. remove them.

Pop out the door handle, and unplug the power lock plug,

Youll also have to take the door lock rod, by spinning the plastic door handle 90 degrees until u can wiggle it out.

next remove the sail panel( The little triangle shaped piece in the corner of the door on the top, ( may have a tweeter in it) ( it just pops out)

Next take a screwdriver (flat head) and pry off the cover of the door handle, there will be
2 phillips head screw behind it ( remove screws)

Unplug power window connector (big green plug)

Now just start gently pry the door panel off with a screw driver, see if u can peek behind the panel and see where the panel clips are, and pry near those areas

Posted on Apr 03, 2010

  • 121 Answers

SOURCE: 2003 HONDA CIVIC LX RADIO CODE

The reset code for your radio is located in the glove compartment. There should be a small sticker on the inside of the compartment door, usually near the left side. The sticker has two sets of numbers printed on it. The number set with five digits is your reset code.

Positive feedback is greatly appreciated.

Good luck and God Bless.

Posted on Jul 29, 2010

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You don't specify make, model, year, engine or transmission, but if an auto, a common cause of this is failure of the 1-2 shift solenoid in the trans, meaning that it cannot find low gears, hence the sluggish takeoff.

It is not an expensive part, but it is best to have the vehicle on a hoist as the trans pan must come off. Also this fault should cause the check engine light or the overdrive light to blink a trouble code.

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Codes 1298,1706 need to find the problem!


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I have a 1989 Toyota Supra GA70, It has an A340E Autoatic Transmission. The problem is sometimes during takeoff it is very sluggish, this only happens sometimes, and other time it takes off normally. ...


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Its possible that your transmissions Shift Solonoids could be acting erratically, either because they themselves are faulty, or the transmission's ECU is faulty, or maybe even the wiring between the two is somewhat faulty.

However it is also possible that your transmission's Speed Governor is holding too much pressure and doesn't realize it needs to downshift when you start slowing down.

Thirdly it is also possible that your Torque-Converter lockup may be siezed, or the wiring feeding it may be faulty.

Transmission repairs are usually somewhat pricey, and difficult to pinpoint, and fix, and I'm sorry to say that most of these causes to your problem really can't be checked without pulling the transmission out of the car, and disassembling it to see what the problem is.

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