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I don't see the brake bleeder nut on the rear of my 2001 Ford Taurus LX. Are they bleed from the front only?

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2 Answers

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  • Ford Master
  • 946 Answers

Probably is broken off. In drum brakes cylinders,you can just bleed the brake cup by tilting it outward at the top,allowing bubbles to leave.
Disc brakes can't be done that way. You might loosen the brake line and see if bubbles will leave. It will be messy. don-ohio (:^)

Posted on May 07, 2017

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  • Ford Master
  • 3,482 Answers

If you have rear disc brakes, the bleeder screw should be on the caliper. 2208 is bleeder screw.
I don't see the brake bleeder nut on the rear of m - bleeder screw-mgkxnf303xgr2hvssd3liypr-1-0.jpg

Posted on May 06, 2017

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

WildBill49
  • 97 Answers

SOURCE: no brakes

Hi Robert!

When bleeding the fronts and the pedal does not go down all the way, stand on the pedal HARD and see if it won't go down then...

The proper sequence is to bleed fronts FIRST... if you had done this, you probably could have avoided this problem... but no worry, it is just a nuisance!

If you still have a problem after trying this, you might have a master cylinder problem... the seals to the fronts might be leaking, not able to build pressure...

So try this and let me know how it goes, and DON't FORGET: Your rating is my ONLY compensation for helping you!

Thanks!
WildBill

Posted on Jul 08, 2008

  • 202 Answers

SOURCE: how do you bleed the front brakes on a 2005 ford taurus

If the car has ABS, you will need to bleed it there also.

Posted on Mar 26, 2009

c17hydro
  • 2984 Answers

SOURCE: how to bleed the brakes for 2001 ford taurus

Please don't forget to rate:


Bleeding The Brake System Bleeding When any part of the hydraulic system has been disconnected for repair or replacement, air enters the lines causing spongy pedal action (because air can be compressed and brake fluid cannot). To correct this condition, it is necessary to bleed the hydraulic system to ensure all air is purged.
Always begin bleeding the brake system from the furthest wheel cylinder or caliper from the master cylinder; the right rear.
NOTE: The right side of the vehicle is the passenger side. The sides of the vehicle are determined from the driver's perspective. This reference is taken from sitting in the driver's seat, facing forward.
Maintain a full reservoir during the bleeding operation. Never use brake fluid that has been drained from the hydraulic system, or from an open container, no matter how clean it is. Always use brake fluid from a new, sealed container. The front and rear reservoir will drain as the front or rear brakes are bled.

  1. Park the vehicle on a level surface. Place the vehicle in PARK (automatic) or REVERSE (manual) with the engine OFF, and apply the parking brake. Chock the rear wheels to prevent vehicle movement. NOTE: Wheel chocks may be purchased at your local auto parts store, or a block of wood cut into wedges may be used.
  2. Loosen the lugnuts from all four wheels, but do not remove the lugnuts until the vehicle is raised and supported properly.
  3. Use an approved jack and raise the vehicle high enough to place jack stands under all four corners of the vehicle. Place the jack stands under the frame or axles of the vehicle. Ensure that the front of the vehicle is raised higher than the rear.
  4. Remove the wheels from the vehicle.
  5. Clean all dirt from around the master cylinder fill cap. Remove the cap and fill the master cylinder with brake fluid until the level is within 1/4 in. (6mm) of the top edge of the reservoir.
  6. Clean the bleeder screws at all four wheels. The bleeder screws are located on the back of the brake backing plate (drum brakes) and at the top of the brake calipers (disc brakes).
  7. Attach a length of rubber hose over the bleeder screw and place the other end of the hose in a plastic jar.
  8. Have an assistant place and hold pressure on the brake pedal.
  9. Open the bleeder screw 1/2 - 3/4 turn. As the bleeder is opened, the brake pedal will travel to the floor. Have the assistant inform you when the pedal has bottomed out. NOTE: Do not remove pressure from the brake pedal once it is bottomed out. No movement to the pedal should occur until the bleeder is closed and the assistant is made aware of the situation. Failure to do this will draw more air into the system.
  10. Close the bleeder screw and tell your assistant remove their foot from the brake pedal. Continue this process to purge all air from the system.
  11. When bubbles cease to appear at the end of the bleeder hose, tighten the bleeder screw and remove the hose.
  12. After bleeding each wheel, check the master cylinder fluid level and add fluid accordingly.
  13. Repeat the bleeding operation at the remaining three wheels, ending with the one closet to the master cylinder. The pattern is, RR, LR, RF, LF.
  14. Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the proper level and install the reservoir cap.

Posted on Jul 22, 2009

  • 24 Answers

SOURCE: front brake pad replacement, any special tools?2001 ford taurus

no special tools just something to push the piston back like a pair of plumer grips or a srurdy screwdriver

Posted on Oct 28, 2009

Sean80000
  • 1867 Answers

SOURCE: 1994 hoda accord lx brakes

Please refer to the link below.

http://corp.advanceautoparts.com/english/youcan/asp/ccr/ccr20011001bb.asp

Posted on Dec 01, 2009

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1 Answer

2001 Ford Taurus LX, I bleed the brakes passenger rear to drivers front. I still have a lot of petal before getting much from the brakes?


Bad calipers or master cylinder can pull in air EVERY time you release the pedal if the cups are bad.
OR adjustment can be loose at the drum or disc. Make sure when you bleed it that you keep the master cyl. reservoir topped up so it doesn't get low enough to pull air also. don-ohio .

May 07, 2017 | Ford Cars & Trucks

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Iv got a '96 ford taurus gl. When bleeding the brakes is there a certain order they should be done in?


Passenger rear, driver rear, passenger front, driver front, hope this helps

May 07, 2016 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have replaced 3 disc brake calipers on my 2001 pt cruiser. after bleeding all 4 brakes 3 times, I started the car and brake pedal goes to floor. is my brake booster shot?


Michael:

You must start bleeding the brakes at the wheel farthest from the master cylinder (usually the right rear), then the next farthest from the master cylinder, then the next, then the closest. If your master cylinder is at the left front of the car, start with the right rear, then the left rear, then the right front, then the left front. If you don't bleed the brakes in the correct order, you are just shifting the air in the lines from one line to another. Make sure that you close the bleeder before letting the brake pedal up, and the engine should not be running when you bleed the brakes... Make sure that the emergency brake is off. Make sure that the master cylinder does not run out of brake fluid at any time that you are bleeding the brakes.

Jan 24, 2016 | 2001 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

I have a 03 ford taurus the break pedal gose to the floor after changing the rear breaks and the front pads and after changing the master cylinder? what else could b the problem


You've done major work and now you'll need to completely bleed air out of the system, to get the fluid to go all the way through. You may also need to adjust the rear brake shoes.

First, bleed the Master cylinder to get fluid through it. This should have been done before installation. Loosen the lines at the M. Cylinder and fill up the reservior with brake fluid. Pump the brake pedal slowly with the cover on the M. Cylinder to prevent fluid from splashing out. Once you've got fluid coming through the M.Cylinder, tighten the brake lines at the M. Cylinder.

Bleeding the brakes is a 2 person operation. You always bleed the brake the farthest from the master cylinder, then the next, the next, and finally the drivers front brake which is the closest to the M. Cylinder.

If you are unfamiliar with this process, you need to remember that you can't let the brake fluid get low in the M. Cylinder, or you have to start all over when air gets back into the lines.

When one person pumps the brakes, after several pumps hold the pedal down as far as it will go and keep pressing to the floor as the other person loosens the bleeder valve. Don't let off of the pedal before tightening the bleeder valve. Then repeat until all of the air is gone.
Teamwork and communication. Both of my wives were able to assist me in bleeding brakes.

You will have to add fluid and repeat this process until you have a firm pedal.

One man bleeder valves work if used properly, but who tells you what is happening at the other end while you're pressing the pedal?

Good luck.

Mar 28, 2012 | 2003 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

I replaced the rear passanger wheel cylinder on my 2000 ford taurus and bleed the breaks from right rear to front drivers side and still have no breaks why


was the wheel cyl leaking? make sure there are no other leaks anywhere i see rusted out line on these a lot check down left side of undercarage fuel lines and brake lines run along there .if you have abs you should only have to bleed rears the front are on different valves no air can get in from a rear leak.If no leaks anywhere master cyl most likely

Nov 30, 2011 | 2000 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

I have a 93 tempo 2.3 and have recently changed the mastercylinder, I believe it is a diagonal system and I can get brake fluid to the driver rear and pass. front, and not the driver front or pass rear i...


I would recommend that you make sure the bleeder nuts on these wheels are clear,then I would make sure your brake fluid is full and open both bleeder nuts and let the system gravity bleed until you get fluid to those wheels and then you should be able to bleed normally

Aug 27, 2010 | 1993 Ford Tempo

3 Answers

I replaced a master cylinder on a 2001 taurus and bench bled the master cylinder before putting it on the car. then bled the 2 lines at the master cylinder and i am getting air out of the front line on...


try disconnecting the front line, have someone else then step on the brake pedal and hold it down while you re-install the line. If that doesn't do it, you probably did get a defective master cylinder.

Mar 07, 2010 | 2001 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Bleed the brake lines


start at the passenger rear tire, have someone PUMP up brakes and hold pressure on them, release pressure by locating small bleeder screw, loosen screw 1/4 turn, brake fluid/air should come out, after brake petal reaches floor tighten bleeder, repeat process until only brake fluid comes out. go to driver side rear repeat, go to pass. side front repeat, go to driver side front repeat, after each bleeding make sure you check brake fluid in reservoir.

Sep 24, 2009 | 1984 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

How to bleed the brakes for 2001 ford taurus


Please don't forget to rate:


Bleeding The Brake System Bleeding When any part of the hydraulic system has been disconnected for repair or replacement, air enters the lines causing spongy pedal action (because air can be compressed and brake fluid cannot). To correct this condition, it is necessary to bleed the hydraulic system to ensure all air is purged.
Always begin bleeding the brake system from the furthest wheel cylinder or caliper from the master cylinder; the right rear.
NOTE: The right side of the vehicle is the passenger side. The sides of the vehicle are determined from the driver's perspective. This reference is taken from sitting in the driver's seat, facing forward.
Maintain a full reservoir during the bleeding operation. Never use brake fluid that has been drained from the hydraulic system, or from an open container, no matter how clean it is. Always use brake fluid from a new, sealed container. The front and rear reservoir will drain as the front or rear brakes are bled.
  1. Park the vehicle on a level surface. Place the vehicle in PARK (automatic) or REVERSE (manual) with the engine OFF, and apply the parking brake. Chock the rear wheels to prevent vehicle movement. NOTE: Wheel chocks may be purchased at your local auto parts store, or a block of wood cut into wedges may be used.
  2. Loosen the lugnuts from all four wheels, but do not remove the lugnuts until the vehicle is raised and supported properly.
  3. Use an approved jack and raise the vehicle high enough to place jack stands under all four corners of the vehicle. Place the jack stands under the frame or axles of the vehicle. Ensure that the front of the vehicle is raised higher than the rear.
  4. Remove the wheels from the vehicle.
  5. Clean all dirt from around the master cylinder fill cap. Remove the cap and fill the master cylinder with brake fluid until the level is within 1/4 in. (6mm) of the top edge of the reservoir.
  6. Clean the bleeder screws at all four wheels. The bleeder screws are located on the back of the brake backing plate (drum brakes) and at the top of the brake calipers (disc brakes).
  7. Attach a length of rubber hose over the bleeder screw and place the other end of the hose in a plastic jar.
  8. Have an assistant place and hold pressure on the brake pedal.
  9. Open the bleeder screw 1/2 - 3/4 turn. As the bleeder is opened, the brake pedal will travel to the floor. Have the assistant inform you when the pedal has bottomed out. NOTE: Do not remove pressure from the brake pedal once it is bottomed out. No movement to the pedal should occur until the bleeder is closed and the assistant is made aware of the situation. Failure to do this will draw more air into the system.
  10. Close the bleeder screw and tell your assistant remove their foot from the brake pedal. Continue this process to purge all air from the system.
  11. When bubbles cease to appear at the end of the bleeder hose, tighten the bleeder screw and remove the hose.
  12. After bleeding each wheel, check the master cylinder fluid level and add fluid accordingly.
  13. Repeat the bleeding operation at the remaining three wheels, ending with the one closet to the master cylinder. The pattern is, RR, LR, RF, LF.
  14. Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the proper level and install the reservoir cap.

Jul 22, 2009 | 2001 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

Bleeding abs brakes


Try using a pressure bleeder. It will force the air out. Works every time.

Nov 08, 2008 | 2001 Ford Mustang

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