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1.4 golf vw 2005 it starts and cuts off


Have you determined the ignition switch is not the cause? Hold the switch slightly forward after start but not enough to engage starter, if it keeps running the ignition starter switch is defective.

Sep 20, 2016 | 2005 Volkswagen Golf 1.4

3 Answers

Why would a vehicle in reverse move forward


The question is a little vague but I think I know what your referring to. All modern automatic transmissions have torque converters. This is the device that connects the engine to the transmission. All vehicle manufacturers like the trans to be nice and smooth shifting. That's great but it does come with some minor drawbacks. If you are facing slightly down hill and you put your car in reverse but do not step on the gas slightly I can guarantee that you will indeed roll forward. You can eliminate that issue by holding your left foot on the brake while you shift into reverse. Then, as soon as you feel the trans engage, gently depress the gas pedal with your right foot and it will eliminate that forward roll problem.

Sep 25, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Car surging


Is the car equipped with the Automatic Transmission?
If so, read on.
Otherwise skip to the end and answer some questions.

POSSIBLE SCENARIO:
I have observed a condition where my car surges slightly when the torque-converter clutch (TCC) cycles between lock and unlock when driving on an uphill grade.
First some basics and history that will explain why the TCC is used.

Engine, Torque Converter, TCC, and Transmission relationship--
The TCC allows for a solid connection between the engine and transmission which allows the input to the transmission to rotate at the same speed as the engine.
Without a TCC, there is slippage between the engine and automatic transmission. The slippage is greatest at low engine RPM. That is what allows the engine to run with the automatic transmission in gear, like when you first shift into gear or stop at a stop sign. When the throttle pedal is depressed, the engine RPM begins to increase and the torque converter begins to slip less and less the more the engine RPM increases. The car moves. But even at cruising speeds the torque converter slips slightly. Engine RPM is greater than transmission input RPM, which is realized as slight decrease in fuel efficiency.
When acceleration is complete and a constant speed is being maintained, the engine power output is reduced to the point where the TCC can engage and eliminate any slippage between the engine and transmission. If the car has a tachometer the engagement of the TCC can be verified when a slight reduction in engine RPM observed without a corresponding change in vehicle speed.
One method used to test the operation of the TCC is as follows:
Find a flat section of road where it is safe to perform the test.
Reach a steady speed and keep the gas pedal depressed with one foot. While observing the tachometer (or listening for an increase in engine RPM), with the other foot depress the brake pedal enough to activate the break light switch but not enough to engage the brakes. When the brake light switch activates, the TCC receives a signal to disengage. With the gas pedal being held steady, release the brake pedal and the engine RPM should decrease when the TCC engages.
Old cars with Automatic Transmissions did not use a TCC. I believe the TCC was put in use in an attempt to increase fuel economy.

MY EXPERIENCE WITH SIMILAR SYMPTOMS
The condition that causes that issue on my car is this:
- A slight uphill grade increases the load on the engine.
The car tends to gradually slow and it is necessary to depress the gas pedal to maintain speed.
- Depressing the throttle pedal (manually, or automatically with cruise control engaged) signals the torque converter clutch to unlock when the load increases slightly. (A more drastic load increase would signal the Transmission to downshift to a lower gear.) The corresponding increase in engine RPM and output is enough to compensate for the reduction in speed. When the vehicle speed, engine RPM, and throttle position stabilize to the point that the TCC will engage and the engine RPM will reduce in correspondence with TCC engagement. Now, if the road conditions have not changed, power output is not enough to maintain vehicle speed. With the increased load caused by full engagement between engine and transmission, and the cycle (surging) repeats itself until the road conditions change.

Does that help?
If not:

QUESTIONS
Please define the symptoms.
What are the road conditions when the surge occurs? (A slight uphill grade?)
What is the frequency of the surge?
Does the engine power output have a noticeable surge?
Is there a speed change related to the surge?
Does the tachometer move up and down with little or no change in vehicle speed?
Are all instrument indication in the normal range?
What else has changed?

Good luck!

May 24, 2014 | Subaru Impreza WRX STi Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Not starting


If I understand your statement correctly, noise but the engine will not "turn over." This sounds like the starter motor is running but the gear that engages the flywheel gear-teeth is not making contact at all or is moving into too-slight contact, just enough to make a lot of noise. In U.S. cars the device on the stater motor that moves the starter gear forward is called a "Bendix." As the starter motor starts to turn, the Bendix shoves a small gear forward, engaging teeth on the flywheel which spins the flywheel to start the engine. If the Bendix is sticking or has failed the gear will not move forward at all or not far enough.

Sarting with the least cost first, I'd look toward a "sticky" bendix. Try using a light penetrating oil or perhaps, WD-40 to free-up the Bendix.

Apr 06, 2014 | 2001 Jaguar XJ8

1 Answer

Neutral safety switch


Maybe the Shift interlock cable is your problem from shifting from drive to park but not sure about the reverse.

Mar 18, 2014 | Mazda Millenia Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Vehicle wont engage in drive but can shift from 1st to second to drive and od off light is flashing on my 2002 ford escape 3.0 4wd


The only reason the lower gears are working is because they engage a separate clutch to assist in engine breaking on downhill grades. You have most likely cracked a forward piston in the transmission, and the transmission may need to be overhauled or replaced.

Aug 15, 2010 | Ford Escape Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Tork converter and transmission change need to know if there is only one way to put it on


Rotate the converter while putting it onto the stator/input shaft of the transmission. Make sure it goes on all the way. Note the converter hub - it will either have a couple of notches cut into the end of the hub or a couple of flats, either case - these engage the pump gear. If not fully engaged then you WILL break the pump when bolting up the transmission. Once it is in place, install the transmission, but as you install it, make sure the converter rotates freely and does not slide out of engagement with the pump (if the trans is tilted forward). When the transmission is completely bolted up you can then slide the converter forward slightly against the flexplate to bolt up (or converter studs through flexplate holes for nuts). Pay careful attention to what you're doing and you'll be OK - if not then be prepared to replace a broken pump!

May 31, 2010 | 1989 Mazda MPV

1 Answer

88 toyota supra auto trans slips. won't up shift to 2nd gear


yep, sounds like your transmissions on its last leg, mabye you can get by, by starting in 2nd, if you have the option lol, but auto tran's are pretty cheap on ebay or try www.supraforums.com seen one for 300$

Apr 02, 2009 | 1988 Toyota Supra

1 Answer

What grade oil goes into a 1998 isuzu kb280dt le gearbox


Clutch adjustment is ussually the cause of such a problem.... oil grade should not have a bearing on the issue; try to lenghen your adjustment rod a little more. For now you can change your shifting habits...Put the trans in first before cranking the engine and before coming to a stop a light...youll soon get the feel of at what speed it will drop right into first, usually just before coming to a stop.

Jan 19, 2009 | 1998 Isuzu Rodeo

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