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Find the part number on a Pajero diesel for the fuel injectors

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: remove and install diesel fuel injector

First, keep everything as clean as possible. Contamination below 30 microns, which cannot be seen by humans, can destory a diesel fuel injection system. Clean everything off anything having to do with connections on the fuel system and cover any connections left open.

Begin by removing the intake manifold. This will remove the clips holding the injection lines passing underneath and around the intake runners. After removing the manifold, cover the openings in the cylinder head (I use wadded-up paper towels).

Next, remove the clips at the brackets on the injection lines closer to the injectors.

Loosen all of the injection connections at the injectors. Do not remove the lines.

You can remove the water crossover tube if it is in your way, but drain about a 1/2 gallon of coolant before your remove the crossover.

Remove the oil fill tube from the timing cover. Turn the engine clockwise, using a 15/16" socket and ratchet (or breaker bar) on the center bolt of the crankshaft. As you turn the engine over, a bolt will show up at the opening where the oil fill tube was removed. Remover the bolt and keep turning the engine over until you have removed all three bolts. Do NOT use the starter to turn the engine over and, after removing the third bolt, do NOT turn the crankshaft any more.

On top of the timing cover, behind the rounded top, is the place where the injection pump is bolted to the cover from the back side. Clean the top of the timing cover where it meets the injection pump and look for a thin line scribed into the cover and one on the injection pump. Note the position of the two lines (they are usually aligned) for reassembly.

Remove the throttle cable assembly from the injection pump. Remove all the wires from the pump and note which connection the big pink wire goes to. The other wires will be green. Remove the return hose at the top of the injection pump.

There are three nuts holding the injection pump to the timing cover and you will need a 15mm socket and/or wrench to remove them. When you do, the injection pump and injection lines can be removed as a unit. Note the position of the driveshaft of the injection pump to set the new one the same way. If you are not going to put things back together right away, cut up a plastic garbage bag and make covers for the injectors. Secure the covers with rubber bands or nylon cable ties to keep dirt out of the injectors.

Carefully transfer the injection lines to the new pump. It is possible to cross them up so pay close attention while moving the lines. Transfer the fuel inlet pipe to the new pump and whatever device is mounted on the passenger side of the old injection pump to the new pump.

Get a new injection pump to timing cover gasket and install it over the timing cover studs. Install the new injection pump after setting the driveshaft to match the holes in the gear inside the timing cover. The pump can only be installed one way since it is indexed to the gear. Reinstall the nuts on the studs and set the timing marks to the same position they were when you removed the old injection pump (the lines on top of the timing cover and the flange of the injection pump). Tighten the mounting nuts. Make sure that all the injection lines line up at their injectors, but do not tighten the connections at the injectors yet.

Put the first bolt back into the gear through the oil fill tube hole. Hand tighten it and then turn the crankshaft clockwise as before to install the remaining two bolts. Then, tighten all the bolts securely and resinstall the oil fill tube. Reinstall the throttle connections on the injection pump.

Install a new piece of 1/4" fuel line from the fuel filter to the injection pump (the old one is usuall brittle since it never gets changed). Remove the covers over the opening in the cylinders heads and reinstall the intake manifold using new gaskets.

Reinstall all the injection line clips that were removed and the coolant crossover tube (if you removed it and don't forget to add coolant to the radiator). Reconnect all the wiring on the injection pump, except for the big pink wire. Install a piece of clear tubing on the top of the injection pump and connect it to the return tee in front of it (where you removed the rubber hose from the old injection pump).

Now comes the fun part: Disconnect the glow plug relay connector (two small wires in a connector) from the middle of the relay. The relay is usually on the driver's fender and close to the battery.

Crank the engine, in short bursts, until you see fuel in the clear tubing on top of the injection pump. When you do, reconnect the big pink wire on the injection pump. Continue to crank the engine in short bursts (allowing the starter to rest between cranking cycles) until you see fuel dripping out of the injection lines at the injectors. When you do, tighten the connections where fuel is dripping. When all lines have been tightened, reconnect the glow plug relay connector. Remove the clear tubing on top of the injection pump and reinstall the fuel line that was removed from that location.

Then, try starting the engine normally. If it will not start, try some WD-40 down the intake. You can use ether, but you MUST disable the glow plugs be removing the connector at the relay.

The engine may run rough or stall at first but it should smooth out after all the remaining air comes out of the system.

Torque values are as follows:

Intake manifold: 25-37 ft-lbs
Gear bolts: 13-20 ft-lbs
Injection pump mounting nuts: 25-37 ft-lbs
Injection lines: 15-24 ft-lbs ("wrench tight" is fine)
Injection pump fuel inlet fitting: 15-20 ft-lbs

Posted on Feb 17, 2010

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SOURCE: 4d56 Pajero Turbo Diesel, blow's alot of smoke

If your car is fitted with Manifold Air Pressure sensor (MAP) check that is operating OK. Sometimes if this is as at fault it can send the wrong signal that the engine is running lean and the engine computer (ECU) in turn compensates by injecting extra fuel. The clouds of smoke are unburnt fuel so not only does it look bad but it is wasteful/costly. The fault on a MAP can evolve slowly and therefore evades the computer diagnostics check for some while before being picked up. Also on the list of things to look at are:- 1) the mass air sensor on the air filter ducting 2) the EGR exhaust gas recirculation valve (perhaps needs a thorough clean) 3) the differential pressure feedback exhaust (DFPE) sensor - lies upstream of the EGR but if faulty can combine to lead to errors in fuel injection quantities.

Posted on May 25, 2010

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1 Answer

Mitsi pajero 2.8d 2001 turns over for ages before starting and revs for a while and then sometimes cuts out ?


Sounds like fuel pump seals. Remove your fuel filter and have a look see if its black.
I have one so try looking on pocuk. pajero owners club uk great place for advice as we all have these trucks and need help every once in a while.

Hope this helps.
Also I run my truck with 250ml of two stroke oil in £50 worth of diesel helps the injectors to work better ;-)

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Fuel pump removal 2.8 fuel pump seal replacement ( Courtesy of R.Ambrose ) Tools and stuff ... My pump number is 104741-3211 ('93 Lwb, Eng 4M40) The drive ... Very carefully undo the nut on the earth terminal by No.1 injector. ... Mark a tooth and the housing (tipex) to ensure the fuel pump is fitted back the same way.

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Sep 23, 2010 - We are a domestic diesel shop in alberta canada and do not deal with ... I rechecked all timing marks several times so I pull injection pump and ...

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CHECK DIESEL INJECTORS, SEE IF THE EXHAUST SMOKES OR SMELL RICH, LESSEN TO THE EXHAUST OR PUT YOUR HAND ON FRONT OF THE TAIL PIPE, SEE IF IT FEELS EVEN AND SMOOTH OR DO YOU FEEL IS MISSION, COULD BE A CLOGGED INJECTOR, BAD INJECTION PUMP, A BAD FUEL FILTER, LARK OF FUEL,

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1 Answer

My pajero 2.8 turbo rattles when cold OK when hot


replace the injector tips as they are squirting and not atomising. They will also be dribbling and that is allowing fuel in before the injection time

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1 Answer

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Engine has a loud rattle,on my 1992 pajero 2.5 diesel


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2 Answers

We have a 3.2 DiD Misubishi Pajero and I think the injector pump is playing up. The car has just started surge and run rough and then starts to smoke like to much diesel is getting into the motor white...


You generally only get white fuel smoke from a diesel when one or more cylinders aren't firing. If it were injecting more fuel than can be burned into a cylinder that is firing you'd get black smoke. You can get gray smoke from a cylinder that is firing cold or late, but blue obnoxious smoke is more common with late injector pump timing. Dirty/failed injectors also generally make a rude blue smoke.

Run a can of Diesel Kleen through it. If you can't get it where you are call a local truck service and ask what they recommend for cleaning the pump.

Check and keep watch on the oil and coolant- white smoke from a warmed up diesel is usually coolant that is getting into the combustion chamber, typically from a failed head gasket or cracked head/block.

If you see any oil floating on the surface of the coolant, or if the oil starts to look milky, this motor must be serviced and the issue found or it won't last long.

lp

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