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Super cycle woman's 16". When and how to use microSHIFT, how do I synchronize it with gear shifts?

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: My 1992 Toyota Camry won't shift into gear after I

First, are you certain that you installed the clutch and throw-out bearing correctly? This may take some trial and error - if you replaced the clutch, you know your way around the transmission. The shifter should have two rods/levers going to two attaching points on the transmission. Disconnect these linkage rods from the transmission. Manually move the connecting points and test by "bumping" the starter until you're sure the transmission is in Neutral. Verify that the stick shift in in the Neutral position, and re-connect the linkage rods. If all goes well, you should now be able to move the shifter through the gears. Good luck

Posted on Sep 29, 2013

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2 Answers

New clutch installed but on pull off it jumps out of 1st gear,Why


Most likely your transmission needs a synchronizer replaced for 1st gear. The synchronizer allows the trans to be put in gear without grinding but also helps hold it in the gear it is shifted into.

Feb 10, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Noise when shifting gears


transmission synchronizers most common cause of transmisson noise in certain gears, and not others, might want to check the gear oil level. Transmission rebuild required. To read about them and what they actually do, then here is a good read:
When you shift gears in your standard shift car, you move a rod that moves a fork that engages the gear. Depending which gear you're shifting to, a different fork does the job. The fork moves the collar to the desired gear, and dog teeth on the collar mesh up with holes on the gear in order to engage it. You engage reverse gear through a separate, small idler gear. The reverse gear always turns in the opposite direction of the other (forward) gears.
In years past, double-clutching was common in order to disengage a gear, allow the collar and next gear to reach the same speed, and then to engage the new gear. To double-clutch shift, you pushed the clutch pedal to free the engine from the transmission. Then the collar moved into neutral. You released the clutch and revved the engine to get it to the right rpm value for the next gear so the collar and the next gear spun at the same rate to allow the dog teeth to engage the gear. When the engine hit the right speed, you depressed the clutch again in order to lock the collar into place on the next gear.
Modern cars use synchronizers in order to avoid the need for double-clutching. A synchronizer, or "synchro," lets the collar and gear synchronize their speeds while they're already in contact but before the dog teeth engage. Each manufacturer's synchro is slightly different than the others, but the basic idea is the same. For instance, a cone on one gear will fit into a cone-shaped depression on the collar. The gear and collar synchronize their speeds thanks to the friction between the cone and collar. Then the outer part of the collar moves out of the way so that the gear can be engaged by the dog teeth.

Dec 16, 2013 | Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I have a 93 Toyota pick up 4x4 standard transmission. Sometimes when I go to reverse, there is a grinding noise, which won't let me shift into reverse. I then need to turn off the vehicle, then engage....


Could be the clutch.
Reverse and first do not have gears that line up like the others do. So if the clutch is not disengaging all the way, they will grind.

Dec 13, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Transmission wont shift into 3rd gear


this might be a simple problem with your gear linkage, your rubber bushes might be worn out, get them replaced... or your gearbox might have broken its synchronizer which actually shifts the gear in the gear box... i prefer u go see a mechanic

Oct 10, 2011 | 1999 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

My 1999 Chevy Silverado 1500 Z71 makes a clunking noise and feels like it got rear ended if I drive it for an hour or so non stop. It seems to be when it shifts from 1st to 2nd gear. I had the ******...


No one can tell you what it is.This is the operating characteristic of your transmission and customer do object to the noise or clunk and dealer discourage the repair. This is TSB 03-07-29-004G. Let me give you a partial copy. INFORMATION
Bulletin No.: 03-07-29-004G
Date: December 15, 2010
Subject: Manual Transmission Operating Characteristics
Cold Operation
Manual transmission operation will be affected by temperature because the transmission fluid will be thicker when cold. The thicker fluid will increase the amount of force needed to shift the transmission when cold. The likelihood of gear clash will also increase due to the greater time needed for the synchronizer assembly to perform its function. Therefore when the transmission is cold, or before it has reached operating temperature, quick, hard shifts should be avoided to prevent damage to the transmission.
Backlash
Backlash noise is created when changing engine or driveline loading. This can occur when accelerating from a stop, coming to a stop, or applying and releasing the throttle (loading and unloading the driveline). This will vary based on vehicle type, build variations, driver input, vehicle loading, etc. and is created from the necessary clearance between all of the mating gears in the transmission, axle(s) and transfer case (if equipped).
Shift Effort
Shift effort will vary among different style transmissions and synchronizer designs. Usually the more heavy duty the transmission, the higher the shift effort because of the increased mass of the components. Shift effort can also be higher in cold weather because the fluid will be thicker. Medium duty transmissions will not shift as quickly as a Corvette transmission. To reduce shift effort, do not attempt to rush the shift - allow the synchronizers to work as designed. Shifting harder will only increase the chance of rushing past the synchronizer leading to grinding while shifting.
Non-Synchronized Gears
Some light duty truck transmissions in 1st gear (creeper-gear) and reverse gears in various transmissions, along with all gears in some medium duty transmissions, may be non-synchronized. This means there is not a mechanism to match input and output shaft speeds to allow for a smooth shift. This function is left up to the driver. This can be noticed if a shift into 1st or reverse is attempted while the vehicle is rolling or before the input shaft stops rotating leading to a gear grind. The grinding can be reduced by coming to a complete stop and pausing for a moment before shifting into the 1st or reverse gear. Some slight grinding can be expected. In medium duty non-synchronized transmissions, the driver must match input shaft (engine) speed to output shaft (driveshaft) speed with every shift. This can be accomplished by double clutching, or by using other methods. If the driver is not able to perform this function properly, there will be gear grinding with each improperly completed shift. Driver training may be required to correct this condition. Clutch brakes are used in medium duty non-synchronized transmissions to allow a shift into gear at a stop. The clutch brake is used to stop the input shaft from spinning, allowing a shift into gear at a stop without grinding. The clutch brake is activated by pressing the clutch pedal all the way to the floor. When the clutch brake is used, it is possible to have a blocked shift with the vehicle stationary. If this occurs, engage the clutch slightly to rotate the input gear to allow the shift. The clutch brake is intended to only be used while at a stop. Care must be taken to not activate the clutch brake while shifting between gears. This could lead to excessive grinding or a blocked or missed shift.

Aug 29, 2011 | Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Hi, I have a vw golf 2003 2L sport 5speed manual. It doesn't shift into 1st gear; what could be the problem?


The problem is the 1st gear synchronizer damaged. You need to replace it with new one. For this operation you need to remove the gearbox out from the car, then dismounting the gearbox, and replace the 1st gear synchronizer.

tdisline_494.jpg

May 05, 2011 | 2003 Volkswagen Golf

1 Answer

Toyota corolla 2006 has a grinding noise when shifting in to second gear up shift and downshift the rest of the gears are fine


If this is a manual transmission it sounds as though you have bad synchronizers for the 2nd gear...what I have done in the past is simply do not use that gear whenever possible to avoid unneccesary wear. It is a very costly job to repair this. You are better of driving it carefully as long as you can, make sure anytime you shift the clutch is 100% depressed before you move the shifter as well as while you make the shift into any gear at all. Do not release it until you are 100% into the gear you want as well. Most synchronizers are damaged by not shifting as I have described and/or jamming the shifter into gears when shifting. It is also critical to immediately have your transmission drained and have new gear oil / or transmission fluid added so that you are not cycling around the broken pieces of metal through the transmission. I have driven some cars like this for years and years. If it still works, do not waste you money on a rebuild...simply do what I suggested and drive carefully, avoid second when possible, and change that tranny fluid more often then reccomended,...GOOD LUCK

Mar 30, 2010 | 2006 Toyota Corolla

4 Answers

Ford ranger, getting harder to shift into gear


Suggest you check the fluid level of the transmission first. Remove the fill plug, and see if it is Below the proper level. Do Not fill at this time! There is a reason for this.

Then I would suggest draining the fluid. You are also looking for brass fragments in the fluid. Drain into a three quart metal, or plastic drain pan. (They are approximately 18 inches across, and 4 inches deep)

1.Manual transmissions use Synchronizer's made of a brass alloy. The synchronizers have tapered teeth, that the nose of the teeth can be worn down. Also a tapered surface on the synchronizer, that can be worn down. Brass fragments in the transmission fluid is a sign of this wear.

Some brass 'dust' will occur as normal wear. A large accumulation means you have problems. Transmission is hard to shift, is one of those symptoms due to this.

This link to an animated working of a five-speed manual transmission, may help to explain how the components interact with each other, and also help me to explain the Synchronizer/s.
(From Howstuffworks.com - Auto- Under the Hood - Transmissions and Drivetrain)

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/transmission3.htm

Looking at the animation, observe the 'gold' colored parts. In particular, observe the the pair of gold colored teeth at the rear. (The teeth are in a vertical row, going up and down)

Now also observe the blue colored teeth next to them, on either side. (On the spinning gears)
You are looking at a side view of the transmission, and also a side view of the Synchronizers.

The synchronizers are round just like the gears. They have a Female tapered surface where they meet the gear. The gear has a Male tapered surface on the outside of the gear, that matches.

When the female tapered surface of the synchronizer meets the male tapered surface of the gear, the friction contact makes the synchronizer start turning the same speed, as the gear.

Helps the gear being shifted into start turning also, and the - teeth of the synchronizer, - gear to be engaged, and - already turning components are synchronized to each other. They will be all turning the same speed, so shifting will be smooth.

This shows you Synchronizer rings for a 4-speed Muncie transmission,

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/MUNCIE-4-SPEED-BRASS-SYNCHRONIZER-RINGS-1963-TO-1974_W0QQitemZ360137693405QQcmdZViewItem?rvr_id=&itemid=360137693405

Enlarge it for a better view.
See the teeth going around the synchronizer ring? Notice that they are pointed, or V shaped. When the nose, or tip of this V is worn down, a manual transmission is hard to shift.

Also observe the flat landing on top. (In this view it's on top) The flat landing has three rectangular cutouts in it. (There are used for Detents)

Come from that top landing, down the side to the teeth. This Side has a tapered surface. Tapered ever so slightly, that it is not readily visible in this photo.
When this tapered surface wears down, the transmission is hard to shift.

Summation?
1.Low fluid will cause hard shifting. It will also cause abnormally high wear of the synchronizer rings, (Synchronizer Rings are also referred to as 'Blocker Rings')

2.Worn Synchronizer Rings,
Broken or worn Detent 'buttons',
Broken Detent Springs,
and worn Synchronizer Hub's,
will cause hard shifting.

Should you not have an abnormal amount of brass shavings in your transmission fluid, and found the fluid to be low, you may want to just replace the fluid to the proper level, and see if this works first.

If so, I suggest contacting your Ford dealer, and see what the proper transmission fluid is for YOUR Ford Ranger. They will go by THE transmission is used in your truck, and will have any updates if better fluid has been developed since your truck was made.

I know dealers are expensive to buy from sometimes, but I implore you to use the transmission fluid they recommend.
It will have special additives.



Oct 31, 2009 | 2004 Ford Ranger

1 Answer

Grinding in first and second gear


There are synchronizer rings on the mainshaft between the synchro hub and the gears. These rings help in meshing the gears so they don't 'grind' when shifting.

I think whoever rebuilt your transmission needs to fix it. It sounds like the synchronizer rings were left out, or possibly there is not enough allowance for the synchronizers to rotate freely -- the axial 'play' when they build up the gearsets on the mainshaft.

May 14, 2009 | 1995 Nissan Pickup

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