Question about 1992 Chevrolet Corvette

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I have no electrical power to the control module ignition on terminal B ?

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Have u checked for blown fuses

Posted on Jul 24, 2009

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2006 chevy impala radio & dash lights stay on now when ahut car off, key out and close and lock doors automatically. Never happened before. Help please..


Could be relay contact's stuck closed allowing power to stay on . Or it could be a BCM - body control module problem .

Retained Accessory Power (RAP)
The retained accessory power (RAP) system allows certain vehicle functions to operate for a specific amount of time after the ignition switch is turned OFF. The body control module (BCM) monitors the ignition switch position, battery condition, and each door ajar switch status to determine whether RAP should be initiated or terminated. RAP is controlled with two different methods; serial data and relay control. Some modules receive a RAP message from the BCM over the serial data circuits. Serial data controlled RAP is deactivated as required by their modules RAP power mode operation. Other subsystems are activated directly by the BCM through a RAP relay. Components and systems that are active in RAP are also activated anytime the ignition is any position other than OFF regardless of the door switch signals.

Relay Controlled RAP
The BCM keeps the RAP relay energized during all power modes, except Off-Awake and Crank. The relay is also energized for approximately 10 minutes after shutting the ignition OFF and removing the key, providing no door is opened.
Relay controlled RAP will end when one of the following conditions is met:
• The BCM receives an input from any door ajar or open switch indicating the opening of any door after the ignition key is out of the ignition.
Important: If the BCM is receiving any door ajar or open signal from those switches when the ignition key is turned OFF, RAP will not initiate.
• The BCM internal timer for the RAP expires after approximately 10 minutes.
• The BCM detects a decrease in battery capacity below a prescribed limit.
Systems powered by the RAP relay during the RAP power mode are as follows:
• A/T shift lock control solenoid assembly (w/ floor shifter)
• Power window circuit breaker
• RAP fuse
• Inside rearview mirror (DD6)
• Sunroof (CF5)
Serial Data Controlled RAP
RAP systems controlled by serial data are as follows:
Radio
Radio RAP activation/termination is the same as relay operation with 1 exception; the only door switch that will turn off the radio during RAP is the driver door open switch.
Vehicle Communication Interface Module (VCIM) (Onstar®)
VCIM RAP activation/termination is the same as radio operation with 1 exception; if there is an active call when the ignition key is turned off the VCIM will remain in RAP mode, and keep the radio in RAP mode until the call is terminated.

Do you know what a DTC - diagnostic trouble code is ?
DTC B1475 00: Retained Accessory Power Circuit

Your best bet , take it to a Chevy dealer !

Jan 31, 2017 | 2006 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

08 avalanche power steps have no power fuse good


Do you know there is a electronic control module for the power steps ? assist step control module !

Circuit/System Description
The assist step control module (ASC) controls the assist step actuators to extend or retract the assist steps. Each actuator consists of an electric motor and a potentiometer. The module supplies a low reference and 10-volt reference source voltage to the potentiometer. The ASC module monitors the voltage drop across the potentiometer on the position signal circuit. When the actuator shaft rotates, the voltage on the position signal circuit changes. The ASC module supplies the actuator motor with a 12-volt control circuit and a ground control circuit. The ASC module controls the direction of the actuator by changing the polarity of the control circuits.

Do you know how to test electric circuits with a DVOM ?
Circuit/System Testing
ASC Disable Switch Circuit Test
Ignition OFF, disconnect the harness connector at the IP multifunction switch.
Test for less than 10 ohms between the listed ground circuit terminal and ground.
• X88/Z88 Terminal 3
• Z75 terminal 1
? If greater than the specified range, test the ground circuit for an open/high resistance.
Ignition ON, verify the scan tool ASC Disable Switch parameter is Inactive.
? If not the specified value, test the signal circuit terminal 9 for a short to ground. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Install a 3A fused jumper wire between the signal circuit terminal 9 and ground. Verify the scan tool ASC Disable Switch parameter is Active.
? If not the specified value, test the signal circuit for a short to voltage or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
If all circuits test normal, test or replace the IP multifunction switch.
ASC Actuator Circuit Test
Ignition OFF, disconnect the harness connector at the appropriate actuator.
Scan tool disconnected, test for less than 20 ohms between the low reference circuit terminal C and ground.
? If greater than the specified range, test the low reference circuit for an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Ignition ON, command the appropriate actuator with a scan tool while using the DMM Min/Max function to capture voltage. Test for greater than 9 volts between the 10-volt reference circuit terminal D and ground.
? If less than the specified range, test the 10-volt reference circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Command the appropriate actuator with a scan tool while using the DMM Min/Max function to capture voltage. Test for greater than 9 volts between the signal circuit terminal E and ground.
? If less than the specified range, test the signal circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Using a scan tool, command the appropriate actuator both directions while using the DMM Min/Max function to capture voltage. Test for greater than 2 volts between the control circuit terminal A and ground.
? If less than the specified range, test the control circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Using a scan tool, command the appropriate actuator both directions while using the DMM Min/Max function to capture voltage. Test for greater than 2 volts between the control circuit terminal B and ground.
? If less than the specified range, test the control circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
If all circuits test normal, replace the ASC actuator.

Nov 24, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where is the body control module on 2006 HHR


Body Control Module (BCM)
Under the I/P below the radio on the right side of the center console.
Do you know what the purpose of the BCM is ?
The body control module (BCM) has a bussed electrical center integrated into the housing. Body control relays and fuses are installed directly on the BCM, which simplifies wiring and junction blocks on the vehicle. The body control system consists of the BCM and its associated controls. Battery positive voltage is provided to the BCM from IBCM BATT 1 fuse and the IBCM BATT 2 fuse in the underhood fuse block. The module grounds are wired to ground G201, G203 and G305. The BCM is wired to the GMLAN High speed serial data buss, and the GMLAN Low speed serial data buss, as well as discrete input and output terminals to control the functions of the vehicle's body.
Serial Data Gateway
The body control module (BCM) in this vehicle functions as a translator between the High and Low speed GMLAN busses. The 2 communication protocols use the BCM to translate communicated serial data messages between the control modules over the 2 serial data busses.
Power Mode Master
This vehicles body control module (BCM) functions as the power mode master (PMM). Refer to Power Mode Description and Operation for a complete description of power mode functions.
Serial Data Power Mode Master
On vehicles that have several control modules connected by serial data circuits, one module is the power mode master (PMM). On this vehicle, the PMM is the body control module (BCM). The PMM receives 3 discrete ignition switch signals to differentiate which power mode will be sent over the Serial Data circuits. The 3-wire Ignition Switch table below illustrates the state of these inputs in correspondence to the ignition switch position:
Relay Controlled Power Mode
The body control module (BCM) uses the discrete ignition switch inputs Off/Run/Crank, Accessory, and ignition 1, to distinguish the correct power mode. The ignition 1 circuit is also routed to the Run/Crank relay for relay controlled power feeds during the appropriate power mode. The BCM, after determining the desired power mode, will activate the appropriate relays for that power mode.
Reprogram the body control module (BCM) after replacement. Refer to Control Module References .




Do you

Sep 24, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

No power at all


Inspect/Test/Replace Hope this helps.

An ignition switch supplies voltage to the ignition control module and/or the ignition coil. Often an ignition sytem thas two wires connected to the run terminal of the ignition switch. On is connected to the module. The other is connected to the primary resistor and coil. The start terminal of the switch is also wired to the module.
You can check for voltage using either a 12-volt test light or a digital multimeter (dmm).
To use a test light:
  • Turn the ignition key off and disconnect the wire connector at the module.
  • Disconnect the S terminal of the starter solenoid to prevent the engine from cranking when the ignition is in the run position.
  • Turn the key to the run position and probe the red wire connection to check for voltage.
  • Check for voltage at the battery terminal of the ignition coil using the test light.
  • Next, turn the key to the start position and check for voltage at the white wire connector at the module and the battery terminal of the ignition coil. If voltage is present, the switch and its circuit are okay.
To do the same test using a DMM:
  • Turn the ignition switch to the off position and back-probe, with the meter's positive lead, the power feed wire at the module.
  • Connect the meter's negative to a good ground at the distributor base.
  • Turn the ignition to the run or start position as needed, and measure the voltage.
  • The reading should be at least 90% of battery voltage.

Dec 21, 2012 | 1999 Buick Regal

1 Answer

2007 HHR Has no power, replaced shifter assembly, still no power.


Check all main power feeds to all fuse centers (boxes) ! Do you know what a electrical distribution diagram is ? How to use a DVOM - digital volt ohm meter to test electrical circuits ?
Has no power, replaced shifter assembly ???? No power where ??? And why would you replace shifter assembly ???? What happens when you turn the key to on ? not start ,just on ? Insturment cluster lights up ?
Is the battery good ? Connections an cables ? Your going to need to check power at the battery ,fuse boxes etc.... Confirm there is B+ voltage somewhere !
Your best bet , take it to a qualified repair shop . You have no idea of the complexity of this vehicle ! Everything is contolled by computer ! The ignition switch is a input to the BCM - body control module , by these inputs the BCM will control the vehicle .
The body control module (BCM) has a bussed electrical center integrated into the housing. Body control relays and fuses are installed directly on the BCM, which simplifies wiring and junction blocks on the vehicle. The body control system consists of the BCM and its associated controls. Battery positive voltage is provided to the BCM from IBCM BATT 1 fuse and the IBCM BATT 2 fuse in the underhood fuse block. The module grounds are wired to ground G201, G203 and G305. The BCM is wired to the GMLAN High speed serial data buss, and the GMLAN Low speed serial data buss, as well as discrete input and output terminals to control the functions of the vehicle's body .
Serial Data Gateway
The body control module (BCM) in this vehicle functions as a translator between the High and Low speed GMLAN busses. The 2 communication protocols use the BCM to translate communicated serial data messages between the control modules over the 2 serial data busses.
Power Mode Master
This vehicles body control module (BCM) functions as the power mode master (PMM). Refer to Power Mode Description and Operation for a complete description of power mode functions.
Power to many of this vehicle's circuits are controlled by the module that is designated the power mode master (PMM). This vehicle's PMM is the body control module (BCM). The PMM controls which power mode (Run, Accessory, Crank, Retained Accessory Power, or Off) is active.
Serial Data Power Mode Master
On vehicles that have several control modules connected by serial data circuits, one module is the power mode master (PMM). On this vehicle, the PMM is the body control module (BCM). The PMM receives 3 discrete ignition switch signals to differentiate which power mode will be sent over the Serial Data circuits. The 3-wire Ignition Switch table below illustrates the state of these inputs in correspondence to the ignition switch position:

Relay Controlled Power Mode
The body control module (BCM) uses the discrete ignition switch inputs Off/Run/Crank, Accessory, and ignition 1, to distinguish the correct power mode. The ignition 1 circuit is also routed to the Run/Crank relay for relay controlled power feeds during the appropriate power mode. The BCM, after determining the desired power mode, will activate the appropriate relays for that power mode.
Run/Crank Relay
The run/crank relay control circuit is connected to a constant ground and is switched by the ignition 1 circuit or the body control module (BCM). The BCM, will in lieu of the ignition switch position, activate the Run/Crank relay during a remote start event. The Run/Crank relay supplies a power signal to the following circuits, when the a Run or Crank power mode is selected:
• Automatic transmission shift indicator
• Automatic transmission (A/T)
• Switched power feeds to the BCM
• Electronic brake control module (EBCM)
• Electronic ignition module (spark control)
• Electronic power steering module (EPS)
• Fuel injectors
• Powertrain control module (PCM)
• Park neutral position (PNP) switch

Do yourself a favor an take it to a qualified repair shop !

Jun 03, 2017 | 2007 Chevrolet Chevrolet HHR LT

1 Answer

05 chevy uplander no crank


anybody else seen this happen ????? their are no magical fixes for automotive electrical problems . You buy yourself a DVOM - digital volt ohm meter an test all the electrical coming into the ignition switch an going out . Do you know how to do automotive elcetrical an electronic testing ? Do you know what voltage drop is ?
Electric Testing Techniques You Need to Know Do you know what a wiring diagram is ? You can find free ones here http://www.bbbind.com/free_tsb.html Enter vehicle info. year , make , model and engine size ! Under system click on electrical distribution , under subsystem click on power distribuition ! Click the search button then the blue link. Find the ignition switch , check power in an out when trying to start the vehicle , voltage drop ! ignition switch could be bad . Do a voltage drop test on the starting circuit , bad positive or ground cable .
Starter Voltage Drop
Relay Controlled Power Mode
The body control module (BCM) uses the discrete ignition switch inputs ignition 1, ignition 3 and crank to distinguish the correct power mode. Once the BCM has determined the power mode selected by the vehicle operator it will energize the Ignition relay, Run relay and retained accessory power (RAP) relay, depending on which power mode is selected.
Your getting into thing's you have no clue about , probably ! Do you know about computer controlled thing's

Ignition 1 Relay
The relay uses a Hot At All Times B+ power source derived from the underhood electrical center. The ignition 1 relay supplies a power signal to the following circuits when the Run or Crank power mode is selected:
• AC clutch relay
• ABS STG angle sensor
• Antilock brake system (ABS) yaw sensor
• Auxiliary power drop connector
• Crank relay
• Cruse control switch
• Electronic brake control module (EBCM)
• Engine control module (ECM)
• HVAC module
• Ignition control module (ICM)
• Instrument panel cluster (IPC)
• Sensing and diagnostic module (SDM)
• Transmission solenoid circuit
Power to many of this vehicle's circuits are controlled by the module that is designated the Power Mode Master (PMM). This vehicle's PMM is the Body Control Module (BCM). The PMM controls which power mode (Run, Accessory, Crank, Retained Accessory Power, or Off) is active.
Serial Data Power Mode
On vehicles that have several control modules connected by serial data circuits, one module is the power mode master (PMM). On this vehicle, the PMM is the body control module (BCM). The PMM receives 3 discrete ignition switch signals to differentiate which power mode will be sent over the Serial Data circuits. The table below illustrates the state of these inputs in correspondence to the ignition switch position:

May 23, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2004 chevy malibu ignition switch


How would you like it if you replaced the switch an that wasn't the problem ? That is very possible without knowing for sure if that is the problem . Testing the electrical supply to the switch an out of the switch is the proper way to diagnose this problem. Plus the ignition switch is just a input to the BCM - body control module . The BCM is really in charge of what mode to put the vehicle in . Your best bet , take it to a qualified repair shop .

The body control module (BCM) has a bussed electrical center integrated into the housing. Body control relays and fuses are installed directly on the BCM, which simplifies wiring and junction blocks on the vehicle. The body control system consists of the BCM and its associated controls. Battery positive voltage is provided to the BCM from IBCM BATT 1 fuse and the IBCM BATT 2 fuse in the underhood fuse block. The module grounds are wired to ground G201, G203 and G305. The BCM is wired to the GMLAN High speed serial data buss, and the GMLAN Low speed serial data buss, as well as discrete input and output terminals to control the functions of the vehicle's body .
Serial Data Gateway
The body control module (BCM) in this vehicle functions as a translator between the High and Low speed GMLAN busses. The 2 communication protocols use the BCM to translate communicated serial data messages between the control modules over the 2 serial data busses.

Normal vehicle serial data communications and the control modules operations will not begin until the system power mode has been identified. Discrete wires from the ignition switch contacts are monitored by a module which acts as the power mode master (PMM) in order to determine the correct power mode. The module which is the PMM communicates the system power mode to all modules on the serial data lines. Refer to Body Control System Description and Operation to identify which module is the PMM and the applicable power mode look up table.

The one that said you may need an ignition switch has no clue as to what's up !
Install a scan tool.
Turn OFF the ignition.
With a scan tool, under Vehicle Control Systems, Computer/Integrating Systems, BCM Data menu observe the Power Mode parameter.
Does the displayed power mode parameter match the actual ignition switch position?
Go to Step 2
Go to Step 6
2
Turn the ignition switch to the UNLOCK position.
With a scan tool, under Vehicle Control Systems, Computer/Integrating Systems, BCM Data menu observe the Power Mode parameter.
Does the displayed power mode parameter match the actual ignition switch position?

May 30, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 92 explorer has no spark


Hi, here are some tests you can do to diagnose the problem. Please let me know if you have questions.

First, use a voltmeter or 12 volt test light to check for power on the red wire going to pin 8 of the ignition control module when the key is on. The module is in the left front corner of the engine compartment.

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jturcotte_2440.gif

If there is no power, the problem is the ignition switch or EEC relay. If there is power, next, check the ignition coil as listed below.

IGNITION COIL TESTINGPrimary and Secondary Circuit Tests
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF , disconnect the battery, then detach the wiring harness connector from the ignition coil to be tested.
  2. Check for dirt, corrosion or damage on the terminals.

PRIMARY RESISTANCE
  1. Use an ohmmeter to measure the resistance between the following terminals on the ignition coil, and note the resistance:

Except 2.3L, 2.5L and 5.0L engines


B+ to Coil 1 B+ to Coil 2 B+ to Coil 3
The resistance between all of these terminals should have been between 0.3-1.0 ohms. If the resistance was more or less than this value, the coil should be replaced with a new one.

SECONDARY RESISTANCE


jturcotte_2439.gif

Fig. Fig. 1: Engine ignition coil harness connections-3.0L and 4.0L engines

  1. Measure, using the ohmmeter, and note the resistance between each corresponding coil terminal and the two spark plug wire towers on the ignition coil. The coil terminals and plug wires towers are grouped as follows:
Except 2.3L, 2.5L and 5.0L engines

Terminal 3 (coil 1)-spark plugs 1 and 5 Terminal 2 (coil 3)-spark plugs 2 and 6 Terminal 1 (coil 2)-spark plugs 3 and 4

If the coils test good, move on the the crankshaft sensor.
Using a DVOM set to the DC scale to monitor less than 5 volts, measure the voltage between the sensor Cylinder Identification (CID) terminal and ground by backprobing the sensor connector. If the connector cannot be backprobed, fabricate or purchase a test harness. The sensor is okay if the voltage reading varies more than 0.1 volt with the engine running at varying RPM. (check both the blue and gray wires at the ignition module with the engine cranking.)



jturcotte_2442.gif

Fig. Fig. 3: CKP sensor wire harness connections for the 4.0L (VIN X and E) engines


If there is power and both the coils and sensor check good, replace the ignition control module.

Oct 27, 2011 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Got fuel to the throttle body but still wont fire,


There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.
The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

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Sep 21, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

I have a slow battery drain on a 2006 Jeep Liberty. Pulling either fuse #34 from the dash fuse box or #7 under the hood (labeled JB Power) will eliminate the drain. According to the owner's manual #34...


Hi
Welcome
Jb power is Junction Block power
Here is a list of tests for this problom

IGNITION-OFF DRAW TEST The term Ignition-Off Draw (IOD) identifies a normal condition where power is being drained from the battery with the ignition switch in the Off position. A normal vehicle electrical system will draw from five to thirty-five milliamperes (0.005 to 0.035 ampere) with the ignition switch in the Off position, and all non-ignition controlled circuits in proper working order. Up to thirty-five milliamperes are needed to enable the memory functions for the Powertrain Control Module (PCM), digital clock, electronically tuned radio, and other modules which may vary with the vehicle equipment.
A vehicle that has not been operated for approximately twenty days, may discharge the battery to an inadequate level. When a vehicle will not be used for twenty days or more (stored), remove the IOD fuse from the Junction Block (JB). This will reduce battery discharging.
Excessive IOD can be caused by:
  1. Electrical items left on.
  2. Inoperative or improperly adjusted switches.
  3. Inoperative or shorted electronic modules and components.
  4. An internally shorted generator.
  5. Intermittent shorts in the wiring.
If the IOD is over thirty-five milliamperes, the problem must be found and corrected before replacing a battery. In most cases, the battery can be charged and returned to service after the excessive IOD condition has been corrected.
1. Verify that all electrical accessories are off. Turn off all lamps, remove the ignition key, and close all doors. If the vehicle is equipped with an illuminated entry system or an electronically tuned radio, allow the electronic timer function of these systems to automatically shut off (time out). This may take up to three minutes. See the Electronic Module Ignition-Off Draw Table for more information.
ELECTRONIC MODULE IGNITION-OFF DRAW (IOD) TABLE Module Time Out?
(If Yes, Interval And Wake-Up Input)
IOD IOD After Time Out Radio No 1 to 3 milliamperes N/A Audio Power Amplifier No up to 1 milliampere N/A Central Timer Module (CTM) No 4.75 milliamperes (max.) N/A Powertrain Control Module (PCM) No 0.95 milliampere N/A ElectroMechanical Instrument Cluster (EMIC) No 0.44 milliampere N/A Combination Flasher No 0.08 milliampere N/A 2. Determine that the underhood lamp is operating properly, then disconnect the lamp wire harness connector or remove the lamp bulb. 3. Disconnect the battery negative cable. 4. Set an electronic digital multi-meter to its highest amperage scale. Connect the multi-meter between the disconnected battery negative cable terminal clamp and the battery negative terminal post. Make sure that the doors remain closed so that the illuminated entry system is not activated. The multi-meter amperage reading may remain high for up to three minutes, or may not give any reading at all while set in the highest amperage scale, depending upon the electrical equipment in the vehicle. The multi-meter leads must be securely clamped to the battery negative cable terminal clamp and the battery negative terminal post. If continuity between the battery negative terminal post and the negative cable terminal clamp is lost during any part of the IOD test, the electronic timer function will be activated and all of the tests will have to be repeated. 5. After about three minutes, the high-amperage IOD reading on the multi-meter should become very low or nonexistent, depending upon the electrical equipment in the vehicle. If the amperage reading remains high, remove and replace each fuse in the Power Distribution Center (PDC) , one at a time until the amperage reading becomes very low, or nonexistent. (Refer to 04 - Vehicle Quick Reference/Fuse Locations and Types - Specifications) for the appropriate wiring information for complete PDC and TIPM fuse, circuit breaker, and circuit identification. This will isolate each circuit and identify the circuit that is the source of the high-amperage IOD. If the amperage reading remains high after removing and replacing each fuse and circuit breaker, disconnect the wire harness from the generator. If the amperage reading now becomes very low or nonexistent, diagnose and repair the Charging System as necessary. After the high-amperage IOD has been corrected, switch the multi-meter to progressively lower amperage scales and, if necessary, repeat the fuse and circuit breaker remove-and-replace process to identify and correct all sources of excessive IOD. It is now safe to select the lowest milliampere scale of the multi-meter to check the low-amperage IOD.
CAUTION: Do not open any doors, or turn on any electrical accessories with the lowest milliampere scale selected, or the multi-meter may be damaged.

6. Observe the multi-meter reading. The low-amperage IOD should not exceed thirty-five milliamperes (0.035 ampere). If the current draw exceeds thirty-five milliamperes, isolate each circuit using the fuse and circuit breaker remove-and-replace process in Step #5 . The multi-meter reading will drop to within the acceptable limit when the source of the excessive current draw is disconnected. Repair this circuit as required; whether a wiring short, incorrect switch adjustment, or an inoperative component is the cause.

Jul 13, 2010 | 2006 Jeep Liberty

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