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I have a 96 polaris 300 explorer with no spark, what is the diagnostics procedure for testing CDI box, coil, and stator / pick up coil?

I have a 96 polaris explorer which i installed a new starter in it, i shut the bike off with kill switch pulled both side covers didn't disconnect any wire except starter wire no the bike has no spark it ran before i change the starter and i didn't remove the flywheel

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SOURCE: 96 polaris with no spark what is the diagnostic proceedure with specs

Check your earth wires and connections, then check the main fuse, sorry I don't know where it is located, might be right by the solenoid.
Check your battery has good charge and continuity.

Posted on Dec 28, 2016

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96 polaris with no spark what is the diagnostic proceedure with specs


Check your earth wires and connections, then check the main fuse, sorry I don't know where it is located, might be right by the solenoid.
Check your battery has good charge and continuity.

Dec 28, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Code p1300 for 96 camry


Code 1300 is specific for each brand, in the case of Toyota it is for a problem with the ignitor which makes the coil spark.
You can research the code online or you may need a shop manual to get the testing procedures. The part is over $300 new and may not be the actual problem.

Mar 11, 2013 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

No spark from coil 1991 chrysler labaron v 6


Start by testing the ignition coil primary, and secondary resistance.

To measure the primary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the positive (+) and negative (-) terminals (the terminals which are connected to the engine wiring harness) on the coil. To test the secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the positive (+) coil terminal and the high voltage cable terminal on the coil. Then, measure the resistance between the positive (+) coil terminal and the coil case; the resistance for the case should exhibit infinite resistance. For coils manufactured by Diamond, the primary resistance at 70-80°F (21-27°C) should be 0.97-1.18 ohms and the secondary resistance should be 11,300-15,300 ohms. Coils built by the Toyodenso company should exhibit a primary resistance at 70-80°F (21-27°C) of 0.95-1.20 ohms and a secondary resistance of 11,300-13,300 ohms. Replace any coil with a new one if it does not meet the specifications.

FAILURE-TO-START TEST Before proceeding with this test make certain that spark has been checked for at the coil. Refer to the ignition coil testing procedures. Failure to do this may lead to unnecessary diagnostic time and wrong test results. CAUTION
Be sure to apply the parking brake and block the wheels before performing any test with the engine running.
  1. Check the battery voltage. It must be at least 12.4 volts to perform the test. If the battery voltage is not at least 12.4 volts, refer to Section 1 for battery charging procedures.
  2. Crank the engine for 5 seconds while monitoring the voltage at the coil positive (+) terminal. If the voltage remains near zero during the entire period of cranking, refer to Section 4 for the On-board Diagnostic checks. The checks will test the PCM and the auto shutdown relay.
  3. If the voltage is at near-battery voltage and drops to zero after 1-2 seconds of cranking, refer to Section 4 On-board Diagnostic procedures. The problem is likely to be related to the distributor reference pick-up circuit to the PCM.
  4. If the voltage remains at near battery voltage during the entire 5 seconds, with the key OFF, remove the PCM 60-way connector. Check the 60-way connector for any terminals that are pushed out or loose.
  5. Remove the connector to the coil positive (+) and connect a jumper wire between the battery positive (+) terminal and the coil (+) terminal.
  6. Using the special jumper wire shown in the illustration, momentarily ground terminal No. 19 of the 60-way connector. A spark should be generated when the ground is removed.
  7. If a spark is generated, replace the PCM with a new one.
  8. If no spark is generated, use the special jumper wire to ground the coil negative (-) terminal directly.
  9. If a spark is produced, inspect the wiring harness for an open circuit condition.
  10. If no spark is produced, replace the ignition coil with a new one.
TESTING
  1. Check for stored trouble codes, then proceed as follows:
    • Fault code 11 - proceed to the next step.
    • Fault code 54 - proceed to step 6.
    NOTE: Before proceeding, verify that a minimum of 12.4 volts is available from the battery for operation of cranking and ignition systems.
  2. Test the distributor pick-up signal reference circuit as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
    2. Unplug the distributor pick-up connector.
    3. Remove the coil wire from the distributor cap and have an assistant hold it 1⁄4 in. (6mm) from a good engine ground.
    4. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
    5. Connect a jumper wire to the gray (GY) wire terminal and touch the other end of the jumper wire to the black/light blue (BK/LB) wire terminal on the distributor harness connector several times. While performing this, observe the coil wire.
      • If there is spark from the coil wire, proceed to the next step
      • If there is no spark from the coil wire, the problem is in the engine controller or wiring.
  3. Check the power supply to the distributor reference pick-up as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
    2. Connect a voltmeter between the orange wire in the harness connector and a known good ground.
      • If the reading on the voltmeter is 8-9.5 volts, proceed to the next step.
      • If the reading is anything but 8-9.5 volts, check for problems in the circuit between the reference connector and the engine controller.
  4. Check the mechanical operation of the distributor as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
    2. Remove the distributor cap from the distributor housing.
    3. Crank the engine while observing the ignition rotor.
      • If the distributor rotor revolves while the engine is being cranked over, replace the distributor pick-up coil assembly with a new one.
      • If the distributor rotor did not rotate, inspect the engine for a mechanical fault and repair as necessary.
  5. If fault code 54 (No distributor sync pick-up signal) is being received, or was received before performing this test, proceed as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
    2. Unplug the distributor pick-up connector.
    3. Connect a voltmeter to the tan/yellow (TN/YL) wire of the harness connector.
    4. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
      • If the reading on the voltmeter is at 4 volts, replace the distributor pick-up coil assembly.
      • If the reading is 0 volts, check for an open in the wiring harness between the reference connector and the engine controller.

Jan 30, 2011 | 1991 Chrysler LeBaron

1 Answer

1985 f-150 I am not getting any spark when the engine cranks. i have checked the cap and rotor and they are not the problem. the wires to the coil are both hot and the ign.module has hot and ground as...


Here is the PIP test procedure for the TFI Ignition Module. If the ignition module is a dura-spark control module mounted out on the driver side fender well, then you can remove the unit and most auto part stores have an ignition module tester and will test it for free.

If the TFI pick-up coil/'stator connector to the ignition module is dark or burnt looking then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to replace the pick-up coil/stator inside of the distributor.

Also, check the fuses and all of the wires to the ignition module for any damaged wires with missing wire insulation and any exposed wires that are touching each other or shorting to ground. Let me know if you require any further assistance.


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Aug 15, 2010 | 1985 Ford F150

2 Answers

No spark from spark plug wires I think it may be the distributor cap or interior parts under cap like rotor and condensor but dont want to change parts thats are fine i replaced the plugs but still no...


There wrere two types of HEI (High Energy Ignition) distributors used by GM in 1985, one was the original design with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap, and the second had the coil mounted seperate from the distributor and used a coil wire.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also if the coil is seperate from the distributor that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


GM HEI Ignition Coil (Mounted In Distributor Cap Type)
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Jul 30, 2010 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevy

1 Answer

1979 chevy van not getting spark.was running fine day before.turns over fine,getting fuel.could it be the module


First thing is what condition are the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires in?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil located in the top of the distributor cap is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Bat" or "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position. Then check the secondary resistance to the ignition coil.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


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Jul 29, 2010 | 1979 Chevrolet C/K 3500

1 Answer

What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




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Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

1991 Caprice Classic.Fuel pump works but does not activate when the car is started with the key. Also no spark. Any ideas?


The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one or all of these systems to malfunction.

There is also the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor and ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition coil to the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.


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Jul 15, 2010 | Chevrolet Caprice Classic Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 91 f250 with 7.5 liter and no spark. where may the problem be?


Use a test light and check to see if there is battery voltage present at the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position if no battery voltage is present at the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position then there is a power supply or wiring problem to the ignition coil, and if there is battery voltage at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then with the test light on the "Neg" (-) or negative side of the ignition coil crank the engine over. The test light should flash or pulse indicating that there is a dwell signal to the ignition coil, and if there is battery voltage to the "Pos" side of the ignition coil and there is a dwell signal to the "Neg" side of the ignition coil, and there is still no spark from the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If there is battery voltage to the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, and there is no dwell signal to the "Neg" side of the ignition coil, then the Ignition module, or the pick-up coil/stator would be the most likely cause of the problem.

Check to see if that ignition system actually used an ignition module on the side of the distributor, and if the distributor does have an ignition module mounted on the side of it, then it is most likely faulty and those modules were prone to failure from excessive engine heat. Also, remove the distributor cap and inspect the connector from the pick-up coil/stator where the ignition module connects to it, and if the connector is dark or burnt looking then also replace the pick-up coil/stator or the entire distributor. You might need a Ford ignition module wrench to remove the ignition module from the side of the distributor and most auto part stores will have one for only a few dollars.

Here are some images to assist you and notice the white connector on the ignition pick-up coil/stator and when that connector turns dark or burnt looking then it is faulty.


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Jun 19, 2010 | 1991 Ford F250

3 Answers

Honda fourtrax


Where is the cdi box located??

May 21, 2009 | 1998 Honda Accord

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