Question about Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Nissan 1400 vacuum pipe from manifold to carburetor seems to be blocked

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 45 Answers

Replace EGR valve

Posted on Dec 27, 2016

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My nissan 1400 carburetor dont want to idle when i start it up when i close the top of the carburetor with my hand then it idles and i can feel its sucking a lot of air...what can i do to fix it


check adjust the float level
check fuel pump pressure
check that the idle circuit shut off solenoid is operational
check for blockage in the idle circuit
By putting your hand over the carby you are in effect creating a vacuum in the carby that is sucking fuel into the manifold through which ever circuit is available
May be a carby over haul would be in order

Feb 17, 2016 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1986 nissian d21 pickup starts up fine but shuts down immediatly after letting of the gas


It is possible that you have a vacuum problem. There could be hundreds of other causes, but start at the beginning and check for a perished rubber vacuum pipe.
Vacuum leaks could also occur between the carburetor and the intake manifold, but on a '86 model, just for fun check the play on the butterfly valve shaft.
Your car is 28 years old, and the butterfly shaft tends to wear out from years of acceleration and deceleration (throttle valve movement). If you do find excessive play on the butterfly shaft, you probably need to have the carb overhauled, or possibly less expensive, have it replaced.

Mar 31, 2014 | 1986 Nissan Pickup 4WD 1986

1 Answer

Got bakkie started revs increase but cannot maintain revs and then cuts out


You could possibly have an air leak in your intake, hense the engine cutting out at low revs. Check your piping from the air filter to the intake manifold, and also your intake sensor.
Unplug the sensor and if it does the same thing then thats your problem.

Mar 19, 2014 | 2007 Nissan 1400 Bakkie

1 Answer

I opened up my 1400 nissan bakkies carburetor to service it and i am not sure where all the differentjets must go


In general there are fewer ways to adjust the newer carbs than the vintage carbs of the past. Often the vacuum at low idle is the problem and you should check a vacuum port on the intake with a Vacuum gauge. Sometimes an EGR valve does not shut completely and the engine struggles at idle. If you find that vacuum is adequate, you can adjust the air mixture screws to provide the highest vacuum reading and then crank them in until the vacuum falls less than 1 inch. It might be beneficial to run the engine and spray a water mist from a hand powered spray bottle around the seams of the intake and carburetor. Also spray any vacuum solenoids or lines. You will notice a change in RPM if there is a leak. You may have a fuelpump problem A clogged fuel filter or low pressure can affect how the caricon1.png idles. Please rate my info.

Jan 21, 2014 | 2007 Nissan 1400 Bakkie

1 Answer

CARBURATOR OF NISSAN 1400 BAKKIE


the ball bearing will be a non return valve for the accelerator pump. When the pump is moved to suck in fuel from the bowl it lifts of the seat and when the pump is pressed down the force of the fuel closes it off and the fuel is squirted in to the manifold.

Jan 19, 2014 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Carburetor settings


In general there are fewer ways to adjust the newer carbs than the vintage carbs of the past. Often the vacuum at low idle is the problem and you should check a vacuum port on the intake with a Vacuum gauge.

Sometimes an EGR valve does not shut completely and the engine struggles at idle. If you find that vacuum is adequate, you can adjust the air mixture screws to provide the highest vacuum reading and then crank them in until the vacuum falls less than 1 inch.

It might be beneficial to run the engine and spray a water mist from a hand powered spray bottle around the seams of the intake and carburetor. Also spray any vacuum solenoids or lines. You will notice a change in RPM if there is a leak.

You may have a fuelpump problem A clogged fuel filter or low pressure can affect how the car idles.

Please rate my info.

Dec 08, 2012 | 2007 Nissan 1400 Bakkie

1 Answer

Egr valve when does it operate


The EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) valve

What is it? This is a device that reduces engine emissions of nitric oxides by allowing a measured amount of exhaust gas to re-enter the intake manifold and mix with the air prior to entering the cylinders. The EGR can be vacuum or electrically driven or a combination of both.

Where is it located? The EGR is most often associated with the intake manifold. The EGR will be sited at a point of contact with both the exhaust and intake manifolds. If the exhaust manifold is remote, for example on the other side of the engine to the intake manifold, there will often be an exhaust feed pipe leading from the exhaust manifold to the EGR sited on the intake manifold.

How does it work? Generally intake manifold vacuum acting on a diaphragm draws up on a valve to open a connection between an entry port from the exhaust gases and an exit port to the intake manifold. An open EGR port makes starting difficult so the valve operation is often impeded by an electrical over-ride until the engine has warmed up, as signaled to the ECU by the coolant temperature sender. In some cases, a differential pressure feedback exhaust (DPFE) sensor fed by pipes from the exhaust feed to the EGR informs the ECU when and by how much the EGR should be open.

Symptoms of faulty EGR

The EGR has two possible fault modes either it is a) open when it should be closed or b) closed when it should be open. (some EGR faults are in fact more likely to be DPFE related)
  • Poor idling: ‘hunts’ at idle and generally rough engine performance. This is due to the air ingress through the split diaphragm or the EGR valve being left open, either event compromises the intake manifold vacuum and in turn this interferes with the ECU’s ability to deliver accurate fuel to air ratio for a given engine speed.
  • Misfire and ‘pinking’: if the EGR is jammed closed or the exhaust feed pipe is blocked (e.g. gummed up with baked carbon) the engine ignition runs lean and very hot, so hot in fact that the fuel air mix can spontaneously ignite causing a misfire. The misfire if pronounced can, in turn, be detected by the engine knock sensors and this gives the appropriate on board diagnostic error codes along with the check engine light. Due to the diesel engines creating more soot in the exhaust a blocked EGR is a much more common complaint in diesels than petrol cars.
  • Surging: A sticking EGR valve can lead to an effect of rhythmic surging a bit like the MAF fault, especially in turbo charged engines. Normally on a warmed up engine the vacuum from the inlet manifold opens the EGR. If the EGR fails to open promptly the turbo can be subject to a slight boost. Extra fuel/air mix is pushed into the inlet manifold as a result, increasing pressure (decreasing the vacuum). Without vacuum in the inlet manifold the EGR closes again but if sticky does so only slowly. This may allow inlet gases to flow through the EGR into the exhaust manifold for a split second. There is a time lag in the sequence of these events leading the engine to surge in cyclical manner.


How to check? With the engine running it may be possible to force the EGR valve open by pressing on the diaphragm with one’s fingers. Failing that pulling off the vacuum line to the EGR, blocking the pipe on the inlet manifold and applying vacuum to the EGR to monitor function will determine if the diaphragm is split. Removal of the EGR assembly and examination of the ports and valve mechanism will reveal any carbon build up.

How to fix? If the diaphragm is split then the EGR needs to be replaced. Most EGR problems are linked to carbon soot build up and this can be cleaned using a cloth, brush and carburetor choke cleaner spray. If the exhaust feeder pipe is blocked this can be cleaned using a piece of frayed hand brake cable as an internal brush. This makeshift brush can be further enhanced by mounting it in a drill to sweep dirt from the interior of lengths of pipe. Some cars (Hondas are a good example) have an elaborate passage way system to provide exhaust gas to each inlet pipe runner. The only way to clean these out is by removing the blanking plugs (no easy task) and then using the makeshift rotary wire brush and carburetor choke spray. New blanking plugs have to be reinstated to make good the passage ways assembly.




Jul 14, 2010 | 1992 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

I have a Nissan Altima 99 than spend a lot of gas wath I can do ?


Dirty air filter

Dirty injectors + o-rings

Vacuum leak at intake manifold and vacuum hose.

Bad Idle Air Control Motor (IAC)

Low compression (170 psi + is OK)

Start cleaning and repair these trouble spots and see is there any improvement.

====

For more advance DIY'er then you may try this.

Use a can of Berryman carburetor clean to locate the vacuum leak.


SEE SAMPLE PICTURE HERE


This is a 20-30 minutes job.

Vacuum leaks can occur in following locations.


Intake manifold AND/OR vacuum lines.


Intake manifold is not accessible unless the engine head if off.

You can still check the potential leak by spraying some Berryman near the intake manifold.

Listen for rpm increase after you introduce the Berryman (FUEL) at idle.


Do the same starting from the brake booster unit (the round unit) on the drive side fire all.

Carefully listen for increase of RPM right after to spray the Berryman to the potential vacuum spot.

Get a friend to HEAR the RPM increase or monitor for RPM on the tech.

DO NOT AIM the Berryman into any heat source.


PLEASE RATE my answer if it is useful to you.

Dec 14, 2009 | 1999 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

Auto Diagnostic Trouble Code


cORRECT. tHIS CODE DOES DEALs With emmissions. P1400 deals with the EGR valve. In case u are not aware, EGR stands for Exhaust Gas Re-circulation. What really this valve does is that it re-cycles some of the exhaust gases into the cylinder for combustion. The EGR valve might be blocked or has malfunctioned. It is advised that this valve changed or consult with a mechanic who is knowledgeable about this technology. a malfunctioned/dis-abled EGR system will cause the car to fail an emissions test, and may cause the EGR passages in the cylinder head and intake manifold to become blocked with carbon deposits, necessitating extensive engine disassembly for cleaning. So it is advised that u repair this ASAP

Jan 19, 2009 | 1997 Nissan Maxima

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

27 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Nissan Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76691 Answers

Phil Lovisek
Phil Lovisek

Level 3 Expert

726 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22219 Answers

Are you a Nissan Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...