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I have a 743 that was on a hill and it went free wheeling down the hill no pressure out of pump. What caused freewheeling?

Air is detectable in hydraulic system. Control valve rebuilt, all hoses replaced,and spider (U joint) between engine an pump replaced. Now no hydraulic pressure

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: I have a ford 1710

I had this problem too. I made the upgrades like you did,
but I kept blowing seals. The solution is really simple, it
seems that if you take it to a shop they figure it out right
away. Where is all this information stored anyway?

One of the screws on the plate holding the power steering
hydraulic diverter (below the pump) needs to have a washer
between the plate and the engine. I don't remember which one
it is but I think it might be the top one. This will bring the shaft
on the priority valve (same as diverter) in line with the seat
on the pump. Without it they are not quite lined up leaving
a gap for the fluid to shoot through and blow the seal. Also,
makes it harder to get the thing together.


Posted on Aug 14, 2008

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  • 92 Answers

SOURCE: 67 mustang GTA steering problem

THESE TYPE CAN TRAP AIR DURING REFILLING, TRY REMOVE CAP ON PUMP, START ENGINE, SLOWLY TURN STEERING WHEEL, RIGHT - LEFT, CHECK FLUID FREQUENTLY WHILE DOING THIS, THIS SHOULD PURGE SYSTEM OF AIR .

Posted on Oct 05, 2008

  • 21 Answers

SOURCE: Had a rough idle and the engine dies while

does yurs have the idle air control motor if so look into that

Posted on Jul 12, 2009

  • 1341 Answers

SOURCE: 2004 Mazda RX-8 PO455

It will not go off by itself,you will need to reset it by connecting to a diagnostic tool.Once cleared if there is any other problem then it will trigger the check engine light again.Hope this helps..

Posted on Sep 03, 2009

  • 14036 Answers

SOURCE: subaru impreza 1993 power steering leak

YOU CANT USE A REGULAR FUEL LINE ON POWER STEERING AS A HIGH PRESSURE HOSE.BECAUSE POWER STEERING PRESSURE IS 1000 PSI.YOU HAVE TO BUY THE POWER STEERING HIGH PRESSURE HOSE IT HAS NUMBER OF PLIES MATERIAL WEAVES TO MAKE IT STRONG.IT WAS MADE FOR POWER STEERING HIGH PRESSURE.YOU DONT HAVE A BLOCKAGE .THE HIGH PRESSURE HOSE JUST WORE OUT.REPLACE IT .IT SHOULD FIX THE PROBLEM.

Posted on Sep 04, 2009

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S10 chevy when driving sputters and pops loses power will not pull on a HILL


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Issue with coolant system: Issue began after I had radiator shop in Sonora Ca. flush out system and replace thermostats as normal maint. and they put the t stats in wrong holes. I only noticed after they...


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Check engine light is on and when checked it pulls a malfunction code (code P1494) leak detection switch or mechanical failure. Is it still under warranty under the emissions? It is a 2001 Jeep Grand...


First off, a model year 2001, its possible still covered under the 5 year/50,000 mile emissions warranty. That's federal law. So you should not have had to pay a penny for that repair since the Leak Detection Pump is an emission control device.

As is the Charcoal Canister. If that is bad there should be no charge for repair or replacement. I hope you saved the receipts because I think they owe you a bunch of money. If they give you an argument about it, call Chrysler and they will take care of it.

Now, are you ready to learn more about the Leak Detection Pump then you will ever need to know? Good! Here it is!

Leak Detection Pump (LDP) Operation And Diagnosis:
* P0442-Evap Leak Monitor 0.040" Leak Detected
* P0455-Evap Leak Monitor Large Leak Detected
* P0456-Evap Leak Monitor 0.020" Leak Detected
* P1486-Evap Leak Monitor Pinched Hose Found
* P1494-Leak Detection Pump SW Or Mechanical Fault
* P1495-Leak Detection Pump Solenoid Circuit

Introduction:
The evaporative emission system is designed to prevent the escape of fuel vapors from the fuel system. Leaks in the system, even small ones, can allow fuel vapors to escape into the atmosphere.

Government regulations (remember I said that?) require on-board testing to make sure that the evaporative (EVAP) system is functioning properly. The leak detection system tests for EVAP system leaks and blockage. It also performs self-diagnostics.

During self-diagnostics, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) first checks the Leak Detection Pump (LDP) for electrical and mechanical faults. If the first checks pass, the PCM then uses the LDP to seal the vent valve and pump air into the system to pressurize it.

If a leak is present, the PCM will continue pumping the LDP to replace the air that leaks out. The PCM determines the size of the leak based on how fast/long it must pump the LDP as it tries to maintain pressure in the system.

EVAP Leak Detection System Components:
Service Port: Used with special tools like the Miller Evaporative Emissions Leak Detector (EELD) to test for leaks in the system.

EVAP Purge Solenoid: The PCM uses the EVAP purge solenoid to control purging of excess fuel vapors stored in the EVAP canister. It remains closed during leak testing to prevent loss of pressure.

EVAP Canister The EVAP canister stores fuel vapors from the fuel tank for purging. EVAP Purge Orifice: Limits purge volume.

EVAP System Air Filter: Provides air to the LDP for pressurizing the system. It filters out dirt while allowing a vent to atmosphere for the EVAP system.

Leak Detection Pump (LDP) Components:
The main purpose of the LDP is to pressurize the fuel system for leak checking. It closes the EVAP system vent to atmospheric pressure so the system can be pressurized for leak testing. The diaphragm is powered by engine vacuum. It pumps air into the EVAP system to develop a pressure of about 7.5' H20(1/4) psi. A reed switch in the LDP allows the PCM to monitor the position of the LDP diaphragm. The PCM uses the reed switch input to monitor how fast the LDP is pumping air into the EVAP system. This allows detection of leaks and blockage.

The LDP assembly consists of several parts. The solenoid is controlled by the PCM, and it connects the upper pump cavity to either engine vacuum or atmospheric pressure. A vent valve closes the EVAP system to atmosphere, sealing the system during leak testing. The pump section of the LDP consists of a diaphragm that moves up and down to bring air in through the air filter and inlet check valve, and pump it out through an outlet check valve into the EVAP system.

The diaphragm is pulled up by engine vacuum, and pushed down by spring pressure, as the LDP solenoid turns on and off. The LDP also has a magnetic reed switch to signal diaphragm position to the PCM. When the diaphragm is down, the switch is closed, which sends a 12 V (system voltage) signal to the PCM. When the diaphragm is up, the switch is open, and there is no voltage sent to the PCM. This allows the PCM to monitor LDP pumping action as it turns the LDP solenoid on and off.

LDP At Rest (Not Powered):
When the LDP is at rest (no electrical/vacuum) the diaphragm is allowed to drop down if the internal (EVAP system) pressure is not greater than the return spring. The LDP solenoid blocks the engine vacuum port and opens the atmospheric pressure port connected through the EVAP system air filter. The vent valve is held open by the diaphragm. This allows the canister to see atmospheric pressure.

Diaphragm Upward Movement:
When the PCM energizes the LDP solenoid, the solenoid blocks the atmospheric port leading through the EVAP air filter and at the same time opens the engine vacuum port to the pump cavity above the diaphragm. The diaphragm moves upward when vacuum above the diaphragm exceeds spring force. This upward movement closes the vent valve. It also causes low pressure below the diaphragm, unseating the inlet check valve and allowing air in from the EVAP air filter. When the diaphragm completes its upward movement, the LDP reed switch turns from closed to open.

Diaphragm Downward Movement:
based on reed switch input, the PCM de-energizes the LDP solenoid, causing it to block the vacuum port, and open the atmospheric port. This connects the upper pump cavity to atmosphere through the EVAP air filter. The spring is now able to push the diaphragm down. The downward movement of the diaphragm closes the inlet check valve and opens the outlet check valve pumping air into the evaporative system. The LDP reed switch turns from open to closed, allowing the PGM to monitor LDP pumping (diaphragm up/down) activity. During the pumping mode, the diaphragm will not move down far enough to open the vent valve.

The pumping cycle is repeated as the solenoid is turned on and off. When the evaporative system begins to pressurize, the pressure on the bottom of the diaphragm will begin to oppose the spring pressure, slowing the pumping action. The PCM watches the time from when the solenoid is de-energized, until the diaphragm drops down far enough for the reed switch to change from opened to closed. If the reed switch changes too quickly, a leak may be indicated. The longer it takes the reed switch to change state, the tighter the evaporative system is sealed. If the system pressurizes too quickly, a restriction somewhere in the EVAP system may be indicated.

Pumping Action:
During portions of this test, the PCM uses the reed switch to monitor diaphragm movement. The solenoid is only turned on by the PCM after the reed switch changes from open to closed, indicating that the diaphragm has moved down. At other times during the test, the PCM will rapidly cycle the LDP solenoid on and off to quickly pressurize the system. During rapid cycling, the diaphragm will not move enough to change the reed switch state. In the state of rapid cycling, the PCM will use a fixed time interval to cycle the solenoid.
The Charcoal Canister

EVAP/Purge Solenoid:
The duty cycle EVAP canister purge solenoid (DCP) regulates the rate of vapor flow from the EVAP canister to the intake manifold. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) operates the solenoid.

During the cold start warm-up period and the hot start time delay, the PCM does not energize the solenoid. When de-energized, no vapors are purged. The PCM de-energizes the solenoid during open loop operation.

The engine enters closed loop operation after it reaches a specified temperature and the time delay ends. During closed loop operation, the PCM cycles (energizes and de-energizes) the solenoid 5 or 10 times per second , depending upon operating conditions. The PCM varies the vapor flow rate by changing solenoid pulse width. Pulse width is the amount of time that the solenoid is energized. The PCM adjusts solenoid pulse width based on engine operating condition.

Vapor Canister:
A maintenance free, EVAP canister is used on all vehicles. The EVAP canister is filled with granules of an activated carbon mixture. Fuel vapors entering the EVAP canister are absorbed by the charcoal granules.

Fuel tank pressure vents into the EVAP canister. Fuel vapors are temporarily held in the canister until they can be drawn into the intake manifold. The duty cycle EVAP canister purge solenoid allows the EVAP canister to be purged at predetermined times and at certain engine operating conditions.

Hope this helps.

Dec 14, 2010 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Leak detection pump sw or mechanical fault


can be caused by failure of the evaporation system leak detection pump or reed switch. When you turn your key on, the LDP sometimes comes on briefly to pressurize the fuel tank. The PCM enables a solenoid value in the pump to allow engine vacuum to shift a diaphram that pressurizes the system. Locate the LDP if the left rear bumper/fender well. With the engine running, remove the vacuum hose to see if vacuum from the engine is being supplied to the pump. If not, check the hose connection at the engine intake manifold. Repair or replace the hose as necessary to restore vacuum to the LDP.
If the engine vacuum is present, the problem may be with the pump or the electrical power to the pump solenoid. You can check the power to the solenoid by removing the connector and probing the connector with a 12 volt test light. Connect the test light clip to a ground point on the frame and probe the cable terminals. With the car running, one of the terminal should light the test light. If not, the problem is the wiring to the alternator. If the test light comes on, replace the LDP. Please let me know if you have any questions.


EVAP Leak Detection Pump Description & Operation
The evaporative emission system is designed to prevent the escape of fuel vapors from the fuel system. Leaks in the system, even small ones, can allow fuel vapors to escape into the atmosphere. Government regulations require onboard Testing to make sure that the evaporative (EVAP) system is functioning properly. The leak detection system tests for EVAP system leaks and blockage. It also performs self-diagnostics. During self-diagnostics, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) first checks the Leak Detection Pump (LDP) for electrical and mechanical faults. If the first checks pass, the PCM then uses the LDP to seal the vent valve and pump air into the system to pressurize it. If a leak is present, the PCM will continue pumping the LDP to replace the air that leaks out. The PCM determines the size of the leak based on how fast/long it must pump the LDP as it tries to maintain pressure in the system.
The main purpose of the LDP is to pressurize the fuel system for leak checking. It closes the EVAP system vent to atmospheric pressure so the system can be pressurized for leak Testing. The diaphragm is powered by engine vacuum. It pumps air into the EVAP system to develop a pressure of about 0.25 psi. A reed switch in the LDP allows the PCM to monitor the position of the LDP diaphragm. The PCM uses the reed switch input to monitor how fast the LDP is pumping air into the EVAP system. This allows detection of leaks and blockage.
The LDP assembly consists of several parts. The solenoid is controlled by the PCM, and it connects the upper pump cavity to either engine vacuum or atmospheric pressure. A vent valve closes the EVAP system to atmosphere, sealing the system during leak Testing. The pump section of the LDP consists of a diaphragm that moves up and down to bring air in through the air filter and inlet check valve, and pump it out through an outlet check valve into the EVAP system. The diaphragm is pulled up by engine vacuum, and pushed down by spring pressure, as the LDP solenoid turns on and off.
The LDP also has a magnetic reed switch to signal diaphragm position to the PCM. When the diaphragm is down, the switch is closed, which sends a 12v (system voltage) signal to the PCM. When the diaphragm is up, the switch is open, and there is no voltage sent to the PCM. This allows the PCM to monitor LDP pumping action as it turns the LDP solenoid on and off.
Diaphragm Downward Movement
Based on reed switch input, the PCM de-energizes the LDP solenoid, causing it to block the vacuum port, and open the atmospheric port. This connects the upper pump cavity to atmosphere through the EVAP air filter. The spring is now able to push the diaphragm down. The downward movement of the diaphragm closes the inlet check valve and opens the outlet check valve pumping air into the evaporative system. The LDP reed switch turns from open to closed, allowing the PCM to monitor LDP pumping (diaphragm up/down) activity.
During the pumping mode, the diaphragm will not move down far enough to open the vent valve. The pumping cycle is repeated as the solenoid is turned on and off. When the evaporative system begins to pressurize, the pressure on the bottom of the diaphragm will begin to oppose the spring pressure, slowing the pumping action. The PCM watches the time from when the solenoid is de-energized, until the diaphragm drops down far enough for the reed switch to change from opened to closed. If the reed switch changes too quickly, a leak may be indicated. The longer it takes the reed switch to change state, the tighter the evaporative system is sealed. If the system pressurizes too quickly, a restriction somewhere in the EVAP system may be indicated.
Diaphragm Upward Movement
When the PCM energizes the LDP solenoid, the solenoid blocks the atmospheric port leading through the EVAP air filter and at the same time opens the engine vacuum port to the pump cavity above the diaphragm. The diaphragm moves upward when vacuum above the diaphragm exceeds spring force. This upward movement closes the vent valve. It also causes low pressure below the diaphragm, unseating the inlet check valve and allowing air in from the EVAP air filter. When the diaphragm completes its upward movement, the LDP reed switch turns from closed to open.

Removal & Installation
The Leak Detection Pump (LDP) is located under the left quarter panel behind the left/rear wheel. It is attached to a two-piece support bracket. The LDP and LDP filter are replaced (serviced) as one unit.

  1. Remove stone shield behind left/rear wheel. Drill out plastic rivets for removal.
  2. Remove 3 LDP mounting bolts.
  3. Remove support bracket brace bolt.
  4. Loosen, but do not remove 2 support bracket nuts at frame rail.
  5. To separate and lower front section of two-piece support bracket, remove 3 attaching bolts on bottom of support bracket. While lowering support bracket, disconnect LDP wiring clip.
  6. Disconnect electrical connector at LDP.
  7. Carefully remove vapor/vacuum lines at LDP.
  8. Remove LDP.

To Install:
  1. Position LDP and carefully install vapor/vacuum lines to LDP and LDP filter.
    WARNING The vapor/vacuum lines and hoses must be firmly connected. Check the vapor/vacuum lines at the LDP; LDP filter and EVAP canister purge solenoid for damage or leaks. If a leak is present, a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) may be set.
  2. Connect electrical connector to LDP.
  3. While raising front section of support bracket, connect LDP wiring clip.
  4. Install 3 LDP mounting bolts.
  5. Join front and rear sections of two-piece support bracket by installing 3 bolts on bottom of support bracket. Do not tighten bolts at this time.
  6. Install support bracket brace bolt. Do not tighten bolt at this time.
  7. Tighten 2 support bracket nuts at frame rail and 3 support bracket bolts and brace bolt.
  8. Position stone shield behind left/rear wheel. Install new plastic rivets.
  9. jturcotte_55.gif

Nov 05, 2010 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Code P1494


DTC P1494 - Leak Detection Pump Switch or Mechanical Fault

The causes are possibly an open or shorted switch sense circuit, a pump switch failure, or an open "fused ignition switch" output. First off, a model year 2001 is will still covered under the emissions warranty. That's federal law. So you should not have had to pay a penny for that repair since the Leak Detection Pump is an emission control device.

As is the Charcoal Canister. If that is bad there should be no charge for repair or replacement. I hope you saved the receipts because I think they owe you a bunch of money. If they give you an argument about it, call Chrysler and they will take care of it.

Now, are you ready to learn more about the Leak Detection Pump then you will ever need to know? Good! Here it is!

Leak Detection Pump (LDP) Operation And Diagnosis:

This article describes the theory of operation for the leak detection system. In addition, information is provided for each of the Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC's) as follows:

* P0442-Evap Leak Monitor 0.040" Leak Detected
* P0455-Evap Leak Monitor Large Leak Detected
* P0456-Evap Leak Monitor 0.020" Leak Detected
* P1486-Evap Leak Monitor Pinched Hose Found
* P1494-Leak Detection Pump SW Or Mechanical Fault
* P1495-Leak Detection Pump Solenoid Circuit

Introduction:
The evaporative emission system is designed to prevent the escape of fuel vapors from the fuel system. Leaks in the system, even small ones, can allow fuel vapors to escape into the atmosphere.

Government regulations (remember I said that?) require on-board testing to make sure that the evaporative (EVAP) system is functioning properly. The leak detection system tests for EVAP system leaks and blockage. It also performs self-diagnostics.

During self-diagnostics, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) first checks the Leak Detection Pump (LDP) for electrical and mechanical faults. If the first checks pass, the PCM then uses the LDP to seal the vent valve and pump air into the system to pressurize it.

If a leak is present, the PCM will continue pumping the LDP to replace the air that leaks out. The PCM determines the size of the leak based on how fast/long it must pump the LDP as it tries to maintain pressure in the system.

EVAP Leak Detection System Components:
Service Port: Used with special tools like the Miller Evaporative Emissions Leak Detector (EELD) to test for leaks in the system.

EVAP Purge Solenoid: The PCM uses the EVAP purge solenoid to control purging of excess fuel vapors stored in the EVAP canister. It remains closed during leak testing to prevent loss of pressure.

EVAP Canister The EVAP canister stores fuel vapors from the fuel tank for purging. EVAP Purge Orifice: Limits purge volume.

EVAP System Air Filter: Provides air to the LDP for pressurizing the system. It filters out dirt while allowing a vent to atmosphere for the EVAP system.

Leak Detection Pump (LDP) Components:
The main purpose of the LDP is to pressurize the fuel system for leak checking. It closes the EVAP system vent to atmospheric pressure so the system can be pressurized for leak testing. The diaphragm is powered by engine vacuum. It pumps air into the EVAP system to develop a pressure of about 7.5' H20(1/4) psi. A reed switch in the LDP allows the PCM to monitor the position of the LDP diaphragm. The PCM uses the reed switch input to monitor how fast the LDP is pumping air into the EVAP system. This allows detection of leaks and blockage.

The LDP assembly consists of several parts. The solenoid is controlled by the PCM, and it connects the upper pump cavity to either engine vacuum or atmospheric pressure. A vent valve closes the EVAP system to atmosphere, sealing the system during leak testing. The pump section of the LDP consists of a diaphragm that moves up and down to bring air in through the air filter and inlet check valve, and pump it out through an outlet check valve into the EVAP system.

The diaphragm is pulled up by engine vacuum, and pushed down by spring pressure, as the LDP solenoid turns on and off. The LDP also has a magnetic reed switch to signal diaphragm position to the PCM. When the diaphragm is down, the switch is closed, which sends a 12 V (system voltage) signal to the PCM. When the diaphragm is up, the switch is open, and there is no voltage sent to the PCM. This allows the PCM to monitor LDP pumping action as it turns the LDP solenoid on and off.

LDP At Rest (Not Powered):
When the LDP is at rest (no electrical/vacuum) the diaphragm is allowed to drop down if the internal (EVAP system) pressure is not greater than the return spring. The LDP solenoid blocks the engine vacuum port and opens the atmospheric pressure port connected through the EVAP system air filter. The vent valve is held open by the diaphragm. This allows the canister to see atmospheric pressure.

Diaphragm Upward Movement:
When the PCM energizes the LDP solenoid, the solenoid blocks the atmospheric port leading through the EVAP air filter and at the same time opens the engine vacuum port to the pump cavity above the diaphragm. The diaphragm moves upward when vacuum above the diaphragm exceeds spring force. This upward movement closes the vent valve. It also causes low pressure below the diaphragm, unseating the inlet check valve and allowing air in from the EVAP air filter. When the diaphragm completes its upward movement, the LDP reed switch turns from closed to open.

Diaphragm Downward Movement:
based on reed switch input, the PCM de-energizes the LDP solenoid, causing it to block the vacuum port, and open the atmospheric port. This connects the upper pump cavity to atmosphere through the EVAP air filter. The spring is now able to push the diaphragm down. The downward movement of the diaphragm closes the inlet check valve and opens the outlet check valve pumping air into the evaporative system. The LDP reed switch turns from open to closed, allowing the PGM to monitor LDP pumping (diaphragm up/down) activity. During the pumping mode, the diaphragm will not move down far enough to open the vent valve.

The pumping cycle is repeated as the solenoid is turned on and off. When the evaporative system begins to pressurize, the pressure on the bottom of the diaphragm will begin to oppose the spring pressure, slowing the pumping action. The PCM watches the time from when the solenoid is de-energized, until the diaphragm drops down far enough for the reed switch to change from opened to closed. If the reed switch changes too quickly, a leak may be indicated. The longer it takes the reed switch to change state, the tighter the evaporative system is sealed. If the system pressurizes too quickly, a restriction somewhere in the EVAP system may be indicated.

Pumping Action:
During portions of this test, the PCM uses the reed switch to monitor diaphragm movement. The solenoid is only turned on by the PCM after the reed switch changes from open to closed, indicating that the diaphragm has moved down. At other times during the test, the PCM will rapidly cycle the LDP solenoid on and off to quickly pressurize the system. During rapid cycling, the diaphragm will not move enough to change the reed switch state. In the state of rapid cycling, the PCM will use a fixed time interval to cycle the solenoid.

The Charcoal Canister

EVAP/Purge Solenoid:
The duty cycle EVAP canister purge solenoid (DCP) regulates the rate of vapor flow from the EVAP canister to the intake manifold. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) operates the solenoid.

During the cold start warm-up period and the hot start time delay, the PCM does not energize the solenoid. When de-energized, no vapors are purged. The PCM de-energizes the solenoid during open loop operation.

The engine enters closed loop operation after it reaches a specified temperature and the time delay ends. During closed loop operation, the PCM cycles (energizes and de-energizes) the solenoid 5 or 10 times per second , depending upon operating conditions. The PCM varies the vapor flow rate by changing solenoid pulse width. Pulse width is the amount of time that the solenoid is energized. The PCM adjusts solenoid pulse width based on engine operating condition.

Vapor Canister:
A maintenance free, EVAP canister is used on all vehicles. The EVAP canister is filled with granules of an activated carbon mixture. Fuel vapors entering the EVAP canister are absorbed by the charcoal granules.

Fuel tank pressure vents into the EVAP canister. Fuel vapors are temporarily held in the canister until they can be drawn into the intake manifold. The duty cycle EVAP canister purge solenoid allows the EVAP canister to be purged at predetermined times and at certain engine operating conditions.

Hope helps (remember rated and comment this).

Jun 17, 2010 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Uses excessive fuel


Brakes could be binding or hand bake cable holding on but you think youd smell burning brakes if that was the case!What condition is the oxy sensor in ,maybe carboned up and contaminated which can tell the engine management to supply more fuel than required.is the air filter air box in good condition and air box lid securely fastened.Should be sealed from air box to throttle body If the air filter is clogged and dirty that can lead to excess fuel consumption.Have you installed any injector cleaner in the fuel tank.cleans up dirty injectors thst can cause excess fuel consumption.

Oct 20, 2008 | 1995 Nissan Pathfinder

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