Question about 2004 Volvo S80

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2004 Volvo S80 2.9 non turbo has positive crankcase pressure. The driver side plastic camshaft cover popped out. Replaced cover and removed PCV box and connecting hoses,they were clean with no crude.

Recent oil change, air filter & plugs. New Timing belt, Camshaft seals. Car ran ok for 5000 miles

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  • Volvo Master
  • 694 Answers

Your pvc or so called oil trapp is plugged replace that and look at the engine where it goes in for blockage too that's the problem Regards Chris

Posted on Mar 26, 2017

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

glennsmart
  • 798 Answers

SOURCE: oil leak?

Whoa whoa ... You've said that the car takes 7 quarts of oil. That's 14 pints. Depending on which engine variant is fitted, engine oil capacity is either:

  • 5.75 litres + 0.4 litre if the oil cooler is drained
  • Turbo - 3.85 litres + 0.6 litre if the oil cooler is drained
  • These figures are for a UK 3 litre version of the 960
If you've filled the car with 7 quarts of engine oil that's almost twice as much oil as should be in the engine. Did you mean pints when you wrote quarts?

If you've filled it with 7 quarts it's overfull. Way too full. Check your oil dipstick - remove it, wipe it clean and then dip the oil level. At the bottom of the dipstick there is a flattened wider part. The oil level should not be below the bottom of this marker, and nor should it be above it. If the oil level is way above the flattened marker bar - you're overfull and will have to drain some oil out of the engine. An overfilled engine will try and blow oil out from wherever it can as the oil system will over-pressurised.

Ok .. so there's no problem with the engine compression. The crankcase isn't overfilled with oil (the crankcase is known as the oil sump in the UK). There's no oil fouling of the plugs and the car isn't burning oil, just leaking it. There's no misfires or running

If the engine isn't overfilled with oil there may be a problem with a broken/sticking piston ring or piston/cylinder. That high oil loss you mention seems severe. A problem with a piston/ring/cylinder can allow the compression to leak past the rings/piston into the engine oil sump and pressurise it. Under pressure, the oil will try and leak to atmosphere from anywhere it can.

A blue smoky exhaust is also an indication of piston/ring problems. A quick check is to start the car. If there's a cloud of blue smoke at start up which clears quickly, it's like to be worn valve guides. If, when driving the car with a warm engine there's blue smoke on acceleration - it points to a problem with rings/piston.

A quick check is to remove the spark plugs. Is there engine oil on one or more of them? An oiled up plug indicates that the engine oil is finding its way up past the rings/piston - and if oil can find its way up to a spark plug, then exhaust gasses/compressed fuel/air can find its way into the engine oil sump and pressurise it.

Another quick check is to start the engine and remove the oil dipstick. If fumes are 'chugging' out of the tube or oil is spitting out, that's another sure-fire sign that the oil sump is becoming pressurised due to a piston ring/piston/cylinder problem.

If you possess or can borrow an engine compression tester there is a further test you can do yourself to confirm whether or not there are piston/ring problems. Basically, a compression tester is just a gauge that screws into the cylinder head in place of the spark plug.

Warm the engine for 5 minutes so that the pistons expand fully in the bores.
Remove the spark plugs
Fit the compression tester into No1 cylinder and crank the engine for 10 seconds. Make a note of the compression reading on the gauge.
Do the same for each cylinder.

Here's an example of what you might find (the figures are for example only)
Cylinder Reading
1 115
2 120
3 118
4 95
5 96
6 117

Figures vary, but there should not be more than a 10% difference between the readings.
In the example above you can see that cylinders 4 and 5 have readings that are well below those of the other cylinders. This is indicating problems within those two cylinders. The lower compression could be due to a head/gasket fault or piston ring/piston problem. A split or worn exhaust valve in the head may cause low compression, a misfire and uneven running but it won't cause the engine oil sump/crankcase to pressurise. Now, some fine tuning to locate the exact problem:

Put a liberal squirt of oil into each cylinder - something like Redex, WD40 or engine oil.Put a cloth over each spark plug hole and spin the engine to get rid of the excess oil. The idea is that the oil you have squirted into the piston bores will form a 'seal' around the outside of the piston/rings.

Do the compression tests again and note the readings. If the readings go up significantly it indicates that the rings/pistons/bore has a problem. Readings that go up significantly are due to the oil forming a seal around the piston which raises the compression whilst testing. Here's an example:Cylinder Reading on 1st test 2nd test
1 115 118
2 120 121
3 118 120
4 95 110 Significant rise - more than 10%
5 96 98
6 117 119

Ok .. all this means is that cylinder 4 has compression problems due to the rings/piston/bore. The 2nd compression reading (with the oil squirted in) is higher simply because the oil formed a seal. Cylinder number 5 still has a low reading which didn't increase significantly on the 2nd 'wet' (when oil is added) test. This suggests that the problem is an exhaust valve/head gasket/head problem.

If there had been no significant increase in the reading on number 4 cylinder, this would suggest valve/gasket head problem. Low readings on adjoining cylinders (and which don't increase with the 2nd compression 'wet' oil test) would indicate a faulty head gasket between those two cylinders.

I'll continue this article ... ran out of word space

Posted on Sep 18, 2008

repairpal
  • 128 Answers

SOURCE: 1999 cross country v70 awd crankshaft seal replacement

Your info is confusing. The rear cam seal is not inside the timing belt cover, and the crank seal is at the bottom of the engine, while the cam seal is at the top.

Is there oil at the top, around the cam seal? Or just at the bottom? It's common for the oil pump seal to leak. If you get the oil pump reseal kit, it contains the oil pump seal and gasket, as well as the crankshaft seal. Make sure you seal the oil pump bolts, Volvo has special copper washers for this purpose.

Just try to locate the oil leak before replacing any more parts. Sometimes it can be something simple like the oil cap seal or the oil trap housing.


Bret
RepairPal.com

Posted on Nov 24, 2008

emissionwiz
  • 75066 Answers

SOURCE: 1992 Volvo 960 Broken timing belt

IF U BROKE THIS BELT WHILE DRIVING U HAVE BENT THE VALVES IN THE ENGINE, THIS IS WHAT IS CALLED AN INTERFERENCE DESIGN ENGINE, THAT MEANS WHEN THE TIMING BELT BREAKS THE PISTONS HIT THE ENGINES VALVES

Posted on Nov 11, 2009

Testimonial: "THanks - was not able to accept this last answer, but thankfully I found another way to say THANKS. That notch was suspicious!"

  • 1757 Answers

SOURCE: need diagram of timing belt and camshaft of VOLVO

My apologies for the delayed response. I am going back and answering questions that were never answered.
Click on the following Link. It has all the Diagrams for the Timing Belt you will need.
Before Clicking, let me know if this helped.
Again my sincerest apologies...

http://www.2carpros.com/car_repair_information/year/2001/make/volvo/model/s40/2001_volvo_s40_timing_belt_diagram_marks.htm

Posted on Feb 26, 2010

TDISLine
  • 1874 Answers

SOURCE: when i removed exhaust camshaft

The timing marks diagram for a 2002 Volvo 1.9 D Turbo:

tdisline_777.jpg
tdisline_778.jpg
Installation:
1. Ensure timing pin inserted [5].
2. Ensure camshaft sprocket timing marks aligned [3].
3. Fit timing belt in following order:
3.1. Crankshaft sprocket.
3.2. Tensioner pulley.
3.3 Camshaft sprocket.
3.4. Water pump pulley.
NOTE: Observe direction of rotation marks on belt.
4. Ensure belt is taut between sprockets.
5. Ensure marks on belt aligned with marks on sprockets [9] & [10].
6. Turn camshaft sprocket slightly in clockwise direction to tension timing belt against tensioner pulley.
7. Fit timing belt to fuel pump sprocket.
8. Turn camshaft sprocket slightly in anti-clockwise direction to tension timing belt against water pump pulley.
9. Install:
9.1. Crankshft pulley [7].
9.2. Crankshaft pulley centre bolt [6]. Use new bolt.
10. Ensure timing pin located correctly [5].
11. Tighten crankshaft pulley centre bolt [6]. Tightening torque = 20 Nm + 100 ... 130 degrees.
12. Remove timing pin [5].
13. Slacken tensioner nut [8].
14. Insert M6 bolt [11].
15. Attach tension gauge to belt at triangle sign (see above pictures). Tool: Volvo No. 951 2797 [12].
16. Screw in M6 bolt until tension gauge indicates 88 +/- 3 Hz.
17. Remove tension gauge [12].
18. Temporaly tighten tensioner pulley bolt [8].
19. Turn crankshaft 4 turns clockwise to TDC on No.1 cylinder.
20. Insert 8 mm timing pin [5].
21. Rock crankshaft slightly to ensure timing pin located correctly.
22. Ensure camshaft sprocket timing marks aligned [3].
23. Remove timing pin [5].
24. Attach tension gauge to belt at triangle sign (see above pictures). Tool: Volvo No. 951 2797 [12].
25. Tension gauge should indicates 85 +/- 3 Hz.
26. If not: Screw in M6 bolt until tension gauge indicates 85 +/- 3 Hz.
27. Remove tension gauge [12].
28. Tighten tensioner nut to 50 Nm [8].
NOTE: DO NOT turn crankshaft again to check timing belt tension.
29. Remove M6 bolt [11].
30. Fit blanking plug and tighten to 20 Nm [4]. Use locking fluid.
31. Install components in reverse order of removal.
32. Check Engine Control Module (ECM) fault memory.

Posted on Jul 18, 2011

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2 Answers

Locate pcv valve.pulled throtle body nothing or valve covers


Crankcase ventilation system is used to consume crankcase vapors created during the combustion process instead of venting them to the atmosphere.
Fresh air is supplied through a filter to the crankcase, the crankcase mixes the fresh air with the blow-by gases and then passed through a positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) orificed tube into the intake manifold.
The PCV orificed tube restricts the flow rate of the blow-by gases using a 3 mm (0.118 in) (a) orifice located at the end of the tube. If abnormal operating conditions arise, the system is designed to allow excessive amounts of blow-by gases to back flow through the crankcase vent tube into the throttle body in order to be consumed by normal combustion. Positive Crankcase Ventilation Hose/Pipe/Tube Replacement
Remove the two nuts (2) from the fuel injector sight shield (1).
Lift the sight shield (1) from the front and pull forward to disengage the rear tab from the bracket.
Disconnect the PCV fresh air tube from the left camshaft cover.
Remove the PCV fresh air tube from the throttle body.
Remove the drive belt. Refer to Drive Belt Replacement .
Remove the power steering pump retaining bolt.
With the hoses still attached, Carefully position aside the power steering pump.
Remove the retaining clip securing the PCV dirty air tube.
Disconnect the PCV dirty air tube from the PCV orificed tube.
Remove the PCV dirty air tube from the intake manifold.

Feb 25, 2016 | 2004 Cadillac Seville

1 Answer

PCV valve should be at crankcase or camshaft casevalve cover?


Hi Eric:
Depending on the engine, the PVC has different locations.
There are holes through the block and head that connect the crankcase to the space under the rocker arm/valve cover.
Check to see where your oil filler cap is located. If it is in the rocker arm/valve cover there has to be a way for it to get into the crankcase.
Cheers.

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Transmission dipstick keep popping up 2004 chevy trilblazer


Is it crankcase pressure that causes it to pop-up? If so, check crankcase ventilation system/pcv. It might be possible that you have so much crankcase pressure, that ventilation system can't handle it, then the pressure gets out anyway it can.

On a warm engine, at idle, if you remove oil fill cap, is there smoke coming out?

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Where is the pcv valve on volvo s60 2.0T 2002


The PCV ( Positive Crankcase Ventilator ) valve is located in a valve cover. It is identifiable by the largish hose ( usually about 1/2 - 3/4 inch diameter )going from it to the intake system. If you have a throttle body injection system, the PCV hose will go to the throttle body. Typically PCVs are on the passenger side of the motor.

Feb 21, 2015 | Volvo S60 Cars & Trucks

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2002 isuzu rodeo cylinder head torque lbs. for 2.2


Print


Removal & Installation

2.2L Engine

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions section.
  2. Drain the cooling system.
  3. Relieve the fuel system pressure.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following: Negative battery cableIntake Air Temperature (IAT) sensor connectorPositive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) valve and hoseAir intake assemblyUpper radiator hoseAccessory drive beltExhaust front pipeAlternator and bracketsCrankshaft Position (CKP) sensor connectorKnock sensor connectorHeater hosesWater bypass hoseFuel linesEvaporative Emissions (EVAP) valve connectorCanister hoseIntake manifoldEngine wiring harness connectors at left rear of the engine compartmentPower steering pump pressure switch connectorFront coverSpark plugs and wiresCamshaft Position (CMP) sensorValve coverTiming belt. Refer to the Timing Belt unit repair section.Timing belt idler pulleysTiming belt rear coverOil pressure switch connectorCamshaftsCylinder head. Remove the bolts in reverse of the tightening sequence.

    Negative battery cable Intake Air Temperature (IAT) sensor connector Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) valve and hose Air intake assembly Upper radiator hose Accessory drive belt Exhaust front pipe Alternator and brackets Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor connector Knock sensor connector Heater hoses Water bypass hose Fuel lines Evaporative Emissions (EVAP) valve connector Canister hose Intake manifold Engine wiring harness connectors at left rear of the engine compartment Power steering pump pressure switch connector Front cover Spark plugs and wires Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor Valve cover Timing belt. Refer to the Timing Belt unit repair section. Timing belt idler pulleys Timing belt rear cover Oil pressure switch connector Camshafts Cylinder head. Remove the bolts in reverse of the tightening sequence.

To install:


0996b43f802097a8.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig. Cylinder head torque sequence-2.2L (VIN D) engine

NOTE Use new cylinder head bolts for assembly.

  1. Install the cylinder head with a new gasket. Tighten the bolts in sequence as follows: Step 1: 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm)Step 2: Plus 90 degreesStep 3: Plus 90 degreesStep 4: Plus 90 degrees
    1. Step 1: 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm)
    2. Step 2: Plus 90 degrees
    3. Step 3: Plus 90 degrees
    4. Step 4: Plus 90 degrees

  2. Install or connect the following: CamshaftsOil pressure switch connectorTiming belt rear coverTiming belt idler pulleys. Tighten the bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm).Timing beltValve coverCMP sensorSpark plugs and wiresFront coverPower steering pump pressure switch connectorEngine wiring harness connectors at left rear of the engine compartmentIntake manifoldCanister hoseEVAP valve connectorFuel linesWater bypass hoseHeater hosesKnock sensor connectorCKP sensor connectorAlternator and bracketsExhaust front pipeAccessory drive beltUpper radiator hoseAir intake assemblyPCV valve and hoseIAT sensor connectorNegative battery cable

    Camshafts Oil pressure switch connector Timing belt rear cover Timing belt idler pulleys. Tighten the bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm). Timing belt Valve cover CMP sensor Spark plugs and wires Front cover Power steering pump pressure switch connector Engine wiring harness connectors at left rear of the engine compartment Intake manifold Canister hose EVAP valve connector Fuel lines Water bypass hose Heater hoses Knock sensor connector CKP sensor connector Alternator and brackets Exhaust front pipe Accessory drive belt Upper radiator hose Air intake assembly PCV valve and hose IAT sensor connector Negative battery cable
  3. Fill the cooling system.
  4. Start the engine and check for leaks.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions Section.
  2. Drain the cooling system.
  3. Relieve the fuel system pressure.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable Intake Air Temperature (IAT) sensor connector Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) valve and hose Air intake assembly Upper radiator hose Accessory drive belt Exhaust front pipe Alternator and brackets Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor connector Knock sensor connector Heater hoses Water bypass hose Fuel lines Evaporative Emissions (EVAP) valve connector Canister hose Intake manifold Engine wiring harness connectors at left rear of the engine compartment Power steering pump pressure switch connector Front cover Spark plugs and wires Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor Valve cover Timing belt. Refer to the Timing Belt procedure. Timing belt idler pulleys Timing belt rear cover Oil pressure switch connector Camshafts Cylinder head. Remove the bolts in reverse of the tightening sequence.

To install:

0996b43f802097a8.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig. Cylinder head torque sequence-2.2L (VIN D) engine


NOTE Use new cylinder head bolts for assembly.

  1. Install the cylinder head with a new gasket. Tighten the bolts in sequence as follows:
    1. Step 1: 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm)
    2. Step 2: Plus 90 degrees
    3. Step 3: Plus 90 degrees
    4. Step 4: Plus 90 degrees

  2. Install or connect the following:

    Camshafts Oil pressure switch connector Timing belt rear cover Timing belt idler pulleys. Tighten the bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm). Timing belt Valve cover CMP sensor Spark plugs and wires Front cover Power steering pump pressure switch connector Engine wiring harness connectors at left rear of the engine compartment Intake manifold Canister hose EVAP valve connector Fuel lines Water bypass hose Heater hoses Knock sensor connector CKP sensor connector Alternator and brackets Exhaust front pipe Accessory drive belt Upper radiator hose Air intake assembly PCV valve and hose IAT sensor connector Negative battery cable
  3. Fill the cooling system.
  4. Start the engine and check for leaks.

May 26, 2012 | Isuzu Rodeo Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Is it normal for a PCV box on a 2004 Volvo S80 with 139,000 miles to need replacement?


Generally after about 100k miles more and more parts on vehicles need replaced. A PCV box could need replaced due to it getting clogged with sludge from your engine crankcase.

The PCV releases the blowby gases that build up in the crankcase. It is a vital part to any newer engine.

Sep 07, 2011 | 2004 Volvo S80

1 Answer

Just wondering where the Camshaft position sensor in my 2005 Dodge Neon is as I need to replace it.


Removal & Installation 2.0L engine camshaft position sensor location chry_car_2.0_cpsloc.gif

2.4L engine camshaft position sensor location chry_car_2.4turbo_cpsloc.gif

2.0L SOHC Engine To Remove:
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Brake booster hose and electrical connector from holders on end of cylinder head cover and reposition
    • Electrical connectors from camshaft position sensor
    • Camshaft position sensor mounting screws
    • Sensor
To Install:
  1. Install or connect the following:
    • Camshaft position sensor. Torque sensor mounting screws to 80 in. Lbs. (9 Nm)
    • Brake booster hose and electrical harness in holders on end of valve cover
    • Electrical connectors to camshaft position sensor
2.4L Turbo Engine To Remove:
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Air cleaner box
    • Plastic clip for the wiring harness from the stud on the valve cover
    • Nut holding the clip for the oil supply line to the turbo and disconnect the fresh air makeup hose from the valve cover
    • Electrical connectors from camshaft position sensor
    • Camshaft position sensor mounting screws
  3. Remove sensor
To Install:
  1. Install or connect the following:
    • Camshaft position sensor torque sensor mounting screws to 80 in. lbs. (9 Nm)
    • Electrical connectors to camshaft position sensor
    • Nut holding the clip for the oil supply line to the turbo and disconnect the fresh air makeup hose to the valve cover
    • Plastic clip for the wiring harness to the stud on the valve cover
    • Air cleaner box
    • Negative battery cable
prev.gif next.gif

Aug 01, 2010 | 2005 Dodge Neon

2 Answers

How difficult is it to change the PCV valve. 2004


PCV is an acronym for positive crankcase ventilation.
The PCV Valve is a very common replacement item on many engines today. It's called the PCV valve for short but it stands for Positive Crankcase Ventilation. When your engine spins it many times collects pressure in the crankcase area, and it has to escape to relieve pressure on the motors bearings and seals. The PCV valve and PCV system is typically located near the intake manifold, and many times comes right off of the valve cover. It is very simple to replace the PCV valve, and you can do so by simply unscrewing it, and screwing in the new valve. We recommend using a little bit of teflon tape or paste to make sure you do not get any oil leaks.
Example (see picture below): 2,4 ltr. Audi V6 engine (BDV, AMM)
b0e80b6.png It's not difficult to replace PCV valve!

Sep 24, 2009 | 2004 Audi A4

1 Answer

Check engine light with P1330. 156,000 miles, regular maintenance and no issues with car's performance


P1330 CVVT Solenoid or is the Camshaft Actuator opening period which is too long.The Camshaft Reset Valve was actually quite easy and quick to replace (well less than 1 hours if one know what their doing). It is located under the Timing Belt cover/camshaft pulley. To gain access, you have to move the black plastic turbo pipes a bit out of the way. This requires removing the two turbo pipe screws closest to the radiator,and one turbo pipe screw mounted at the center of the turbo piping (it screws into a long metal clip on top of the piping). Then remove the hard rubber hose that connects to the turbo pipe closest to the windshield washer reservoir. The rubber tubing is fastened to the turbo pipe by a standard screw-type hose clamp. Pop off that rubber hose with a bit of effort. I would not try to pry it off, because you might break the plastic turbo pipe. Just use your hands and be 'persuasive'.
(If you have a non-turbo 2.9L, then the above two paragraphs don't apply.) There is no need to remove the long black plastic cover that covers the engine horizontally. You only have to remove the two Torx fasteners and two spring clips on the actual Timing Belt cover. Since the turbo piping is now loose, you can move it a bit out of the way to gain access to the two torx fasteners, then pop the spring clips and remove the Timing Belt cover.The Camshaft Reset Valve is at the top left under the Timing Belt cover. It is held in place by 4 bolts and has an electrical connector that also needs to be removed. Try to get the same unit with the same wiring, the new 'improved' unit looks slightly different and any requires cutting off the old connector on the engine harness and splicing in the new unit.

Aug 26, 2009 | 1999 Volvo S80

2 Answers

It sounds like sucking air


Sounds like it's time for some basic maintenance. Some of the emission controls require changing. More specifically, the PCV. Positive Crankcase Valve.

At 60,000, and 100,000 miles this are supposed to be changed, but conditions may require a change sooner.

May 19, 2009 | 2005 Volvo S40

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