Question about Cars & Trucks

Open Question

The ball that's supposed to fit in the nest doesn't quite seem to be long enough. is there a way to adjust or extend linkage to fit ball pocket. thanks.

Posted by on

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

93 ford tempo, changed neutral safety switch. worried i may have broken the kickdown lever, reattached all the linkage to it and now the transmission won't shift into 2nd gear until about 35mp


What about the rest of the shift points. 2 to 3 and 3 to 4? If the others are normal than the problem is with the 1-2 internals and not the T-V linkage.
It seems the transmission Is acting as if the throttle is wide open; for the 1-2 shift, therefore there is something in the linkage is broken or out of adjustment since your work. The last step before opening up the transmission to replace the TV linkage is to make sure the external TV cable linkage is set up right, and after is verified, if you are still seeing WOT upshift points that function of the internal to external kick down parts will need to be repaired. Sorry.

If you know a good local independent transmission specialist you might see him and get some advice.

Nov 17, 2014 | 1993 Ford Tempo

1 Answer

How to replace the shift linkage in the pontiac montana van


On that van, like many other GM front-wheel-drive vehicles, the shift cable goes through a bracket on the transmission to the linkage( the little metal arm). Where the cable connects to the linkage, there is a ball stud. It takes quite a bit of force to disconnect the cable from that. If it became disconnected at that ball without any other outside influence, the shift cable may need to be replaced. You can try pushing the plastic end of the shift cable back on to that ball stud ,it should click into place.
If the ball stud became disconnected from the linkage(little metal arm), the linkage would need to be replaced.
There should be a locknut holding the linkage to the transmission stud right above the range selector switch. If it came loose of there, you may need a new linkage, and to replace that nut

Jun 09, 2014 | 2001 Pontiac Montana

1 Answer

2000 chevy sliverado will not go in to park


More than likely you have a linkage problem. The cable or mechanical linkage that positions the transmission may have slipped and not allowing your selector to push it all the way up into park. This is a fairly common problem with automatic transmissions. It will allow you to shift into all the other gears but fails to push or pull, which ever the case up far enough to fully engage the park mechanism in your transmission. I have had the same problem on several vehicles over the years. Place the vehicle on level ground if possible and scotch it to where it cannot roll and with the engine off get someone to work the selector while you look for the linkage movement. When it reaches it full extension into park see if there is not an adjustment somewhere on the linkage that will extend or contract it more. The reason I say extend or extract is because some vehicles push the transmission into park and on others it pulls it in. At any rate it isn't going far enough to fully engage the lock inside of the transmission. Probably a small movement of this linkage will solve your problem. If it has no adjustment, then I would go to a local parts house and ask the salesman about it. He can look it up and tell you if it has a bushing or something that has worn to the point that it will not engage. I hope this is helpful and solves your problem. However, there is a chance that you have problems inside your transmission. In all of the years I have been involved with vehicles I have seen this only a couple of times and then they were due to the fact that someone had shifted into park while the vehicle was moving at a fairly high rate of speed.
Gillight

Jul 19, 2012 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

I have a 1996 f150 extended cab 5.8l 4x4 and my passenger wheel has play in it. do you think it could be the wheel bearings or could you give me a list of what to check for.


It could be. That and the ball joints and tie rod ends are the most comon causes of play. To check them yourself you will need a helper. Jack that wheel clear of the ground after you block the wheels. Never trust the e-brake by itself. Have a helper rock the wheel from the 12 and 6 o'clock position and watch for play at the outer ends of the upper and lower control arms. If the wheel moves in and out and doesn't affect the control arms there is a bad ball joint. Next get your helper torock it from the 9 and 3 o'clock positions. while you watch the tie rods. The whole linkage will probably move a little as he does this. You are looking for a spot where the wheel moves but not the linkage. There are an inner and outer tie rode end on each side. Check both. If your helper has movement in the wheel at both positions and there is none under the truck then the wheel bearing is the likely culprit. Hope this helps.

Sep 11, 2011 | 1996 Ford F150 Regular Cab

1 Answer

1986 cadillac rebuilt rochester quadrajet 4 barrel carburetor .Started car right up .problem is starts with choke engaged and instead of kicking down once warmed up it reaves higher.its not flooding out...


It sounds like whoever rebuilt the carb hooked the choke linkage up the wrong way. The mechanism can go together wrong and still fit. One of the pieces is a counterweight to trip the linkage off and it is likely in there wrong. It is usually painted green. The linkage will have to come apart and be redone. I've rebuilt a few and never had any luck finding a good diagram of how it is supposed to go together. There is one piece that has small steps on it, and when the choke is activated it is supposed to lock out the back barrels. The steps are what makes your engine rev higher when you try to kick it down. You have to play with it, put it together, close the choke and then trip the throttle. If it doesn't open try again. Sorry but hope this helps.

May 31, 2011 | Cadillac Brougham Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

STeering wheel is loose and noisy while steering. Sounds like something broke inside.


This might help to understand the steering linkage: REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Fig. 1: Steering linkage used on the Bronco and 4-wheel drive F-150 84928067.gif
Fig. 2: Steering linkage used on the 4-wheel drive F-350 84928070.gif
Fig. 3: Steering linkage used on F-Super Duty chassis/cab 84928071.gif
Pitman Arm EXCEPT F-SUPER DUTY STRIPPED CHASSIS AND MOTOR HOME CHASSIS
  1. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  2. Disconnect the drag link at the Pitman arm. You'll need a puller such as a tie rod end remover.
  3. Remove the Pitman arm-to-gear nut and washer.
  4. Matchmark the Pitman arm and gear housing for installation purposes.
  5. Using a 2-jawed puller, remove the Pitman arm from the gear.
  6. Installation is the reverse of removal. Align the matchmarks when installing the Pitman arm. Tighten the Pitman arm nut to 170-230 ft. lbs. (230-312 Nm); torque the drag link ball stud nut to 50-75 ft. lbs. (68-102 Nm), advancing the nut to align the cotter pin hole. Never back off the nut to align the hole.
F-SUPER DUTY STRIPPED CHASSIS MOTOR HOME CHASSIS
  1. Matchmark the Pitman arm and sector shaft.
  2. Disconnect the drag link from the Pitman arm.
  3. Remove the bolt and nut securing the Pitman arm to the sector shaft.
  4. Using a 2-jawed gear puller, remove the Pitman arm from the sector shaft. To install:
  5. Aligning the matchmarks, slide the Pitman arm onto the sector shaft. If the arm won't slide on easily, use a cold chisel to spread the separation. NEVER HAMMER THE ARM ONTO THE SHAFT! Hammering on the arm will damage the steering gear!
  6. Install the nut and bolt. Tighten the nut to 220-300 ft. lbs. (298-407 Nm).
  7. Connect the drag link.
Tie Rod and Drag Link EXCEPT RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  2. Remove the cotter pins and rust from the drag link and tie rod ball studs.
  3. Remove the drag link ball studs from the right-hand spindle and Pitman arm.
  4. Remove the tie rod ball studs from the left-hand spindle and drag link.
  5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Seat the studs in the tapered hole before tightening the nuts. This will avoid wrap-up of the rubber grommets during tightening of the nuts. Tighten the nuts to 70 ft. lbs. (95 Nm). Always use new cotter pins.
  6. Have the front end alignment checked.
RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in the straight-ahead position.
  3. Remove the nuts connecting the drag link ball studs to the connecting rod and Pitman arm.
  4. Disconnect the drag link using a tie rod end remover.
  5. Loosen the bolts on the adjuster clamp. Count the number of turns it take to remove the drag link from the adjuster. To install:
  6. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Install the drag link with the same number of turns it took to remove it. Make certain that the wheels remain in the straight-ahead position during installation. Seat the studs in the tapered hole before tightening the nuts. This will avoid wrap-up of the rubber grommets during tightening of the nuts. Tighten the adjuster clamp nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm). Tighten the ball stud nuts to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm).
  7. Have the front end alignment checked.
Connecting Rod RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in the straight-ahead position.
  3. Disconnect the connecting rod from the drag link by removing the nut and separating the two with a tie rod end remover.
  4. Loosen the bolts on the adjusting sleeve clamps. Count the number of turns it takes to remove the connecting rod from the connecting rod from the adjuster sleeve and remove the rod.
  5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Install the connecting rod the exact number of turns noted during removal. Tighten the tie rod nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm); the ball stud nut to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm).
  6. Have the front end alignment checked.
Tie Rod Ends RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE Fig. 4: Remove the cotter pin from the castellated nut at the ball stud 88288p02.jpg
Fig. 5: Remove the nut from the ball stud 88288p03.jpg
Fig. 6: Use a tie rod end puller tool to remove the ball stud from the Pitman arm 88288p04.jpg
Fig. 7: Liquid correction fluid makes excellent paint to mark the threads of the tie rod end 88288p05.jpg
Fig. 8: For a more accurate reinstallation, you may measure the tie rod end prior to removal 88288p06.jpg
Fig. 9: After having loosened the nut, unscrew and remove the tie rod end 88288p07.jpg
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  3. Remove the ball stud from the Pitman arm using a tie rod end remover. NOTE: Optional: paint a mark or measure the length of the tie rod end threads to ease reinstallation in as close to the original position as possible.
  4. Loosen the nuts on the adjusting sleeve clamp. Remove the ball stud from the adjuster, or the adjuster from the tie rod. Count the number of turns it takes to remove the sleeve from the tie rod or ball stud from the sleeve. To install:
  5. Install the sleeve on the tie rod, or the ball in the sleeve the same number of turns noted during removal. Make sure that the adjuster clamps are in the correct position, illustrated, and torque the clamp bolts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm).
  6. Keep the wheels facing straight-ahead and install the ball studs. Tighten the nuts to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm). Use new cotter pins.
  7. Install the drag link and connecting rod.
  8. Have the front end alignment checked.
prev.gif next.gif

Sep 18, 2010 | 1996 Ford F150 Regular Cab

2 Answers

My clutch pedal suddenly stuck to the floor but wont engage anymore. The cable seemed fine


As far as I can remember, the Jetta has a ball & socket linkage on top of the gearbox. This linkage eventually wear out & the ball will pop out of the socket thus giving you no clutch pedal.
Lift the bonnet & have a look on the right hand side of the engine, you should be able to see what I mean. Push the ball back into the socket & you'll get your clutch pedal back. Chances are the clutch will probably go again unless you replace the worn parts but they're a cheap enough fix.
Hope this helps, Stephen.

Oct 28, 2009 | 1997 Volkswagen Jetta

1 Answer

Where are the lubrication fittings on a 2007 Ford Expedition EL?


There are usually no fittings to grease on the ball joints or steering linkages. Recommend a front end inspection every other oil change as I have seen the ball joints go bad at 50000 miles.

Apr 06, 2009 | 2007 Ford Expedition EL XLT

2 Answers

1982 rabbit shift linkage


There is a plastic ball that is in the shift linkage that also wears and is usually not included in the shift linkage bushing kit. It is attached to a metal piece and is bolted to the shift linkage. This is generally the problem if you already replaced the bushings.

Sometimes the linkage is out of adjustment but I would make sure that the ball is not worn first. They generally cost $5.00 - $8.00 or so.

If you need to adjust the linkage you can try the following, but if the bushings or the ball is worn adjustment will not do any good.

There is an adjustment on the shift rod that goes from the shifter to the transmission. It is a rod slipped into a tube with a locking collar or clamp.

The way that I do this is to make sure that your vehicle is in 1st gear and then loosen the bolt on the clamp.

Make sure that the clamp is loose enough so that the shaft can slip in the tube. Put the shifter in the 1st gear position and then tighten the clamp.

You may need to fiddle with this a little to get it in just the right spot.

This is much easier if you have an assistant.


Nov 05, 2008 | 1983 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

17 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cars & Trucks Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

74896 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22095 Answers

Randy Ohler

Level 3 Expert

14585 Answers

Are you a Car and Truck Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...