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O2 sensor stuck on lean bank#1. Does the o2 senor have to be replaced and if so how do you reach the connector?

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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Ck for a vac leak first. Have the readings scanned to see if the sensors are doing their job & there s no other cause. To get to the conn, start at the sensor & trace the wire back to the connection. The u can do a direct test of the sensor. u can pull a vac hose on bank 1, get a propane torch & let in some propane & see if the sensor reacts. Clear the codes & see if they return. After all is said & done U may just need the sensor?! Good luck

Posted on Dec 17, 2016

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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The O2 sensor might need to be replaced or might not - ideally the next stage in diagnosis would be to test it to ensure the internal heating element is working and then by using a sensor simulator and tester.

This step is desirable because the sensor might be telling the truth and the lean condition is caused by fuelling problems.

Practically speaking, if the existing sensor has covered a few years and more than fifty or sixty thousand miles it could be a good idea to take the opportunity to change it regardless. This is advice from NGK, even if it eventually proves not to be the fault it has longer term economic and reliability benefits.

Reaching the connector is another story...
Follow the cable back from the sensor and do what you have to, remove or dismantle what you have to, to reach the connector. Stand on your head if need be...
Car designers and manufacturers seem to want people to suffer...

Posted on Dec 17, 2016

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Hi i have a 2002 ford ranger and it has teas codes P0446 P0135 P0141 P2195 P0403 P0171


P0446: EVAP System Vent Control Circuit http://www.autocodes.com/p0446_ford.html

P0135: O2 Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction Bank 1 Sensor 1
P0135 Ford O2 Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction Bank 1 Sensor 1

P0141: O2 Heater Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 2
P0141 Ford O2 Heater Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 2

P2195: Oxygen Sensor Signal Biased/Stuck Lean - Bank 1 Sensor 1
http://www.autocodes.com/p2195_ford.html

P0403:Exhaust Gas Recirculation Control Circuit http://www.autocodes.com/p0403_ford.html

P0171: Fuel Injection System Too Lean Bank 1 http://www.autocodes.com/p0171_ford.html

Nov 15, 2016 | 2002 Ford Ranger

2 Answers

2010 f-150 signal stuck lean bank 2 sensor 1


It could be the sensor, or a fuel mixture problem for that side.
A mechanic would use a scanner to watch the data flow on that sensor while making that side run rich.

Feb 23, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Ford freestar 2004 where is the O2 sensor #1 located


There is 4 senors the bank 1 sensor 1 is located in front of the LH (Drivers side) catalytic converter
Hope this helps

Jun 22, 2014 | 2004 Ford Freestar

2 Answers

2000 navigator system too lean


Too Lean on which Bank of the Motor?

To have a lean O2 Code --you could have a rich fuel
condition & the pcm drove the fuel trim lean

Next you could have a vacuum leak-in the intake or exhaust system

Third you could have a failed O2 Sensor

Front or Upstream Oxygen Sensors get replaced at 100,000 miles

The front sensors are on the exhaust pipe between the motor &
the converter.

Will need a long handled flex head O2 Sensor Wrench

Mar 17, 2014 | 2000 Lincoln LS

1 Answer

05 navigator codes po012 intake " A " camshaft position over ******** bank 1 po302 random misfire po302 cyl. 2 misfire po303 cly. 3 misfire po304 cyl. 4 misfire po2195 o2 stuck lean bank 1 sensor 1 po2196...


there is nothing wrong with the timing chain position . Just a series of sensors that have gone outside the set parameters so if you check and change each one you will clear the faults.

Jan 03, 2014 | Lincoln Navigator Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What do i have to change if codes po1151 and po155 come up on my 1999 lincoln town car?


P0155 - 02 Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
This code refers to the front oxygen sensor on Bank 2. The heated circuit in the oxygen sensor decreases time needed to enter closed loop. As the O2 heater reaches operating temperature, the oxygen sensor responds by switching according to oxygen content of the exhaust surrounding it. The ECM tracks how long it takes for the oxygen sensor to begin switching. It the ECM determines (based on coolant temp) that too much time elapsed before the oxygen sensor began operating properly, it will set P0155. See also: P0135 (Bank 1).

Potential Symptoms: You will likely notice poor fuel economy the illumination of the MIL.

Causes: A code P0155 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
O2 Heater element resistance is high
Internal short or open in the heater element
O2 heater circuit wiring high resistance
open or short to ground in the wiring harness

Possible Solutions:
Repair short or open or high resistance in wiring harness or harness connectors
Replace oxygen sensor (cannot repair open or short that occurs internally to sensor)



P0156 - 02 Sensor Circuit Malfunction (Bank 2 Sensor 2)
The o2 (oxygen) sensors measure oxygen content in the exhaust. The PCM (powertrain control module) then uses this information to regulate fuel injector pulse. The o2 sensors are very important for the proper operation of the engine. Innacurate or faulty o2 sensors can cause the PCM to add or take away fuel based on the faulty o2 sensor voltage which can cause a host of problems.

A P0156 code refers to the Bank 2,2 o2 sensor or the downstream (post-cat) o2 sensor on Bank 2. It is a four wire sensor. The PCM supplies a ground circuit and a reference voltage circuit of about 0.5 volts. Also for the o2 sensor heater element there is a battery voltage supply wire and another ground circuit for that. The o2 sensor heater allows the o2 sensor to warm up faster, thus achieving closed loop in less time than it would normally take for the exhaust to warm the sensor up to operating temperature. The O2 sensor varies the supplied reference voltage based on oxygen content in the exhaust. It is capable of varying from about 0.1 to 0.9 volts, 0.1 V indicating lean exhaust and 0.9 V indicating rich exhaust. This P0156 code indicates that the Bank 2, 2 o2 sensor is stuck low for too long or isn\'t active at all.

Symptoms: Often post-cat o2 sensor problems present few symptoms since they are inputs to the PCM to monitor catalytic converter quality and don\'t directly control fuel. sometimes no symptoms are noticeable. However the following may be possible on some vehicles:
MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
Decrease in MPG
Increase in tailpipe emissions

Causes: Potential causes of an P0156 code include:
Bad O2 sensor
Signal shorted to voltage
Wiring problems due to contact with exhaust components
Holes in exhaust near o2 sensor

Possible Solutions:
If you have access to a scan tool, check the signal voltage for the Bank 2,2 oxygen sensor with the engine at normal operating temperature. Is it stuck low currently? If so, increase RPM for a few seconds and see if it affects the reading. If it begins working with increased RPM, check for holes in the exhaust near the o2 sensor that may cause a false lean. If the exhaust pipe is intact, the sensor is sluggish, replace it.

If the Bank 2,2 o2 sensor voltage reading remains low with increased RPM, unplug it and then observe the reading. It should have increased to about 0.5 volts or thereabouts. If it did, check for water intrusion or other connector problems. If none are found, replace the shorted o2 sensor. If the voltage reading is still stuck low after unplugging the sensor, then suspect a wiring problem. Using a voltmeter, with the o2 sensor unplugged, check for voltage on the signal circuit at the o2 sensor connector(PCM side). It can vary with model, but should be about 0.5 volts and not above 1 volt. If the voltage reading is too high, repair short to voltage on signal circuit. If the signal voltage checks out, suspect the PCM.


Hope this helps (remember to rate this answer).

Jun 06, 2011 | Lincoln Town Car Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

1997 plymouth voyager w/ codes: P0140 O2 sensor circuit no activity detected (bank 1(2) sensor 2


The Powertrain control module (PCM) will provide a .45 volt reference voltage to the Oxygen sensor. When the O2 sensor reaches operating temperature, it will generate a voltage that will vary depending on the oxygen content of the exhaust. Lean exhaust generates a low voltage (less than .45V) and rich exhaust generates a high voltage (greater than .45V). O2 sensors on a specific bank marked as "sensor 2" (as this one is) are used to monitor emissions. A Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) system (catalytic converter) is used to control tailpipe emissions. The PCM uses the signal received from Oxygen sensor 2 (#2 indicates aft of catalytic converter, #1 indicates pre-converter) to read efficiency of TWC. Normally this sensor will switch between high and low voltage at a noticeably slower rate than the front sensor. This is normal. If the signal received from rear (#2) O2 sensor indicates that the voltage has "stuck" between .425V to .474 V, the PCM determines this sensor is inactive and this code will set.
Potential Symptoms Your check engine light(CEL), or malfuction indicator lamp (MIL) will be illuminated. There will not likely be any noticeable drivability problems other than the MIL. The reason is this: The rear or post catalytic converter Oxygen sensor does not affect fuel deliver(this is an exception on Chryslers). It only MONITORS the efficiency of the catalytic converter. For this reason, you will likely not notice any engine trouble.
Causes The causes for a P0140 code are fairly few. They could be any of the following:
  • Shorted heater circuit in O2 sensor. (Usually requires replacement of heater circuit fuse in fuse block also)
  • Shorted signal circuit in O2 sensor
  • Melting of harness connector or wiring due to contact with exhaust system
  • Water intrusion in harness connector or PCM connector
  • Bad PCM
Possible Solutions This is a fairly specific problem and shouldn't be too difficult to diagnose.
First, start engine and warm up. Using a scan tool, watch the Bank 1, sensor 2, o2 sensor voltage. Normally the voltage should switch slowly above and below .45 volts. If it does, the problem is likely intermittent. You'll have to wait for the problem to surface before you can accurately diagnose.
However, if it doesn't switch, or is stuck then perform the following: 2. Shut off vehicle. Visually check the Bank1,2 harness connector for melting or chafing of the harness or the connector. Repair or replace as needed 3. Turn ignition on, but engine off. Disconnect the O2 sensor connector and check for 12Volts at the Heater Circuit supply and for proper ground on the heater circuit ground circuit. a. If 12V heater supply is missing, check the proper fuses for an open in the circuit. If heater circuit fuse is blown, then suspect a bad heater in the o2 sensor causing a blown heater circuit fuse. Replace sensor and fuse and recheck. b. If ground is missing, trace the circuit and clean or repair ground circuit. 4. Next, with connector still unplugged, check for 5 Volts on the reference circuit. If this is missing, check for 5 Volts at the PCM connector. If 5 Volts is present at the PCM connector but not at the o2 sensor harness connector, then there is an open or short in the reference wire supply between the PCM and the o2 sensor connector. However, if there is no 5 Volts present at the PCM connector, the PCM is likely at fault due to internal short. Replace PCM. ** (NOTE: on Chrysler models, a common problem is the 5Volt reference circuit can be shorted out by any sensor on the car that uses a 5 Volt reference. Simply unplug each sensor one at a time until the 5 Volts reappears. The last sensor you unplugged is the shorted sensor. Replacing it should fix the 5 Volt reference short.) 5. If all the voltages and grounds are present, then replace the Bank 1,2 O2 sensor and re-test.

May 26, 2011 | Plymouth Voyager Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2006 hundai elantra P2270 code. If this is an O2 sensor, which one?


Possible O2 sensors:

P2270 O2 Sensor Signal Stuck Lean Bank 1 Sensor 2
P2271 O2 Sensor Signal Stuck Rich Bank 1 Sensor 2
P2272 O2 Sensor Signal Stuck Lean Bank 2 Sensor 2
P2273 O2 Sensor Signal Stuck Rich Bank 2 Sensor 2
P2274 O2 Sensor Signal Stuck Lean Bank 1 Sensor 3
P2275 O2 Sensor Signal Stuck Rich Bank 1 Sensor 3
P2276 O2 Sensor Signal Stuck Lean Bank 2 Sensor 3
P2277 O2 Sensor Signal Stuck Rich Bank 2 Sensor 3
P2278 O2 Sensor Signals Swapped Bank 1 Sensor 3 / Bank 2 Sensor 3
---
This is Bank 1 (closer to the dash panel) Sensor 2 (located after the catalytic converter).

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Note: A malfunctioning front oxygen sensor may cause fuel trim codes to set.
  1. Several Diagnostic Trouble Codes use specific terminology to refer to sensor location. The illustration and key below explain the following terms:
  2. Engine BANK Bank 1 is closer to the dash panel, (also referred to as RH or right hand). Bank 2 is closer to the radiator, (also referred to as LH or left hand).
  3. UP Refers to Sensor 1 or "front sensor". It is located closer to the exhaust manifold and before the catalytic converter.
  4. DOWN Refers to Sensor 2 or "rear sensor." It is located after the catalytic converter.
  5. The following examples show how to interpret oxygen sensor terminology:
  6. B1/S1 = Bank 1/Sensor 1 = Dash panel side, BEFORE the catalyst or "upstream"
  7. B2/S2 = Bank 2/Sensor 2 = Radiator side, AFTER the catalyst or "downstream"

Aug 06, 2010 | Hyundai Elantra Cars & Trucks

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