Question about 1991 Toyota Corolla

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1991 corolla; cooling system losing water, but no visible evidence of leakage under car. When I turn the motor on and top off the radiator, the water gurgles and gets hot fast. must always top off radiator before driving, temperature gauge indicates motor is running hot

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Head gasket failure & or warped head
Get it fixed asasp!!!

Posted on Jul 20, 2009

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I need to know how to fix an ac on a 1991 Toyota corolla


Air conditioner is required to have:
- Good electrical and electronic connections.
- Receiver and drier be in a good condition with clean and transparent sight glass.
- Clean evaporator (cooling coil) and condenser (in front of radiator).
- Working condenser fan.
- Neat pipe lines.
- Reliable expansion valve.
- Reliable and tested compressor.
- There is no leakage in the whole system.
- Refrigerant oil and gas.
NOTE: All of the operations must be performed in a well ventilated area, away from heat and fire.

Jul 31, 2014 | 1991 Toyota Corolla

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Things to test when checking cooling system


<p>A leak detection additive is available through the parts department that can be added to cooling system. The additive is highly visible under ultraviolet light (black light) (1). Pour one ounce of additive into cooling system. Place heater control unit in HEAT position. Start and operate engine until the radiator upper hose is warm to touch. Aim the commercially available black light tool at components to be checked. If leaks are present, black light will cause the additive to glow a bright green color.<br /> <p>The black light can be used in conjunction with a pressure tester to determine if any external leaks exist .<br /> <p><b>PRESSURE TESTER METHOD</b><br />he engine should be at normal operating temperature. Recheck the system cold if the cause of coolant loss is not located during the warm engine examination. <br /> WARNING <p> HOT, PRESSURIZED COOLANT CAN CAUSE INJURY BY SCALDING.<br /> <p>Carefully remove the radiator pressure cap from the filler neck and check coolant level. Push down on cap to disengage it from the stop tabs. Wipe the inside of filler neck and examine the lower inside sealing seat for nicks, cracks, paint, dirt and solder residue. Inspect the radiator-to- reserve/overflow tank hose for internal obstructions. Insert a wire through the hose to be sure it is not obstructed.<br /> <p>Inspect cams on the outside of filler neck. If the cams are damaged, seating of the pressure cap valve and tester seal will be affected.<br /> <p>Attach pressure tester (7700 or an equivalent) to radiator filler neck (1).<br /> <p>Operate tester pump to apply 103.4 kPa (15 psi) pressure to system. If hoses enlarge excessively or bulge while testing, replace as necessary. Observe the gauge pointer and determine the condition of the cooling system according to the following criteria:<br /> <p><b>Holds Steady:</b> If the pointer remains steady for two minutes, serious coolant leaks are not present in system. However, there could be an internal leak that does not appear with normal system test pressure. If it is certain that coolant is being lost and leaks cannot be detected, inspect for interior leakage or perform Internal Leakage Test. Refer to <a>INTERNAL LEAKAGE INSPECTION</a>.<br /> <p><b>Drops Slowly:</b> Indicates a small leak or seepage is occurring. Examine all connections for seepage or slight leakage with a flashlight. Inspect radiator, hoses, gasket edges and heater. Seal small leak holes with a Sealer Lubricant (or equivalent). Repair leak holes and inspect system again with pressure applied.<br /> <p><b>Drops Quickly:</b> Indicates that serious leakage is occurring. Examine system for external leakage. If leaks are not visible, inspect for internal leakage. Large radiator leak holes should be repaired by a reputable radiator repair shop.<br /> <a></a> <p><b>INTERNAL LEAKAGE INSPECTION</b><br /> <p>Remove engine oil pan drain plug and drain a small amount of engine oil. If coolant is present in the pan, it will drain first because it is heavier than oil. An alternative method is to operate engine for a short period to churn the oil. After this is done, remove engine dipstick and inspect for water globules. Also inspect the transmission dipstick for water globules and the transmission fluid cooler for leakage.<br /> <br /> WARNING <p> WITH RADIATOR PRESSURE TESTER TOOL INSTALLED ON RADIATOR, DO NOT ALLOW PRESSURE TO EXCEED 145 KPA (21 PSI). PRESSURE WILL BUILD UP QUICKLY IF A COMBUSTION LEAK IS PRESENT. TO RELEASE PRESSURE, ROCK TESTER FROM SIDE TO SIDE. WHEN REMOVING TESTER, DO NOT TURN TESTER MORE THAN 1/2 TURN IF SYSTEM IS UNDER PRESSURE.<br /> <p>Operate the engine without the pressure cap on the radiator until the thermostat opens. Attach a Pressure Tester to filler neck. If pressure builds up quickly it indicates a combustion leak exists. This is usually the result of a cylinder head gasket leak or crack in engine. Repair as necessary.<br /> <p>If there is not an immediate pressure increase, pump the Pressure Tester. Do this until indicated pressure is within system range of 110 kPa (16 psi). Fluctuation of gauge pointer indicates compression or combustion leakage into cooling system.<br /> <p>Because the vehicle is equipped with a catalytic converter, <b>do not</b> remove spark plug cables or short out cylinders to isolate compression leak.<br /> <p>If the needle on the dial of pressure tester does not fluctuate, race engine a few times to check for an abnormal amount of coolant or steam. This would be emitting from exhaust pipe. Coolant or steam from exhaust pipe may indicate a faulty cylinder head gasket, cracked engine cylinder block or cylinder head.<br /> <p>A convenient check for exhaust gas leakage into cooling system is provided by a commercially available Block Leak Check tool. Follow manufacturers instructions when using this product.<br /> <p><b>COMBUSTION LEAKAGE TEST - WITHOUT PRESSURE TESTER</b><br /> <p>DO NOT WASTE reusable coolant. If the solution is clean, drain the coolant into a clean container for reuse.<br /> <br /> WARNING <p> DO NOT REMOVE CYLINDER BLOCK DRAIN PLUGS OR LOOSEN RADIATOR DRAINCOCK WITH SYSTEM HOT AND UNDER PRESSURE. SERIOUS BURNS FROM COOLANT CAN OCCUR.<br /> <p>Drain sufficient coolant to allow thermostat removal(Refer to 7 - COOLING - STANDARD PROCEDURE). Remove accessory drive belt or (Refer to 7 - COOLING/ACCESSORY DRIVE/DRIVE BELTS - REMOVAL).<br /> <p>Add coolant to radiator to bring level to within 6.3 mm (1/4 in) of the top of the thermostat housing.<br /> <br /> CAUTION <p> Avoid overheating. Do not operate engine for an excessive period of time. Open draincock immediately after test to eliminate boil over.<br /> <p>Start engine and accelerate rapidly three times, to approximately 3000 rpm while observing coolant. If internal engine combustion gases are leaking into cooling system, bubbles will appear in coolant. If bubbles do not appear, internal combustion gas leakage is not present.

on Jan 20, 2011 | Subaru Legacy Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Mitsubishi shogun 2004 2.5TD


Hi There, How about letting us know your given name, seems friendlier when answering your questions? Okay the problem your friend is having can be caused by something very inexpensive, the radiator cap, or as expensive as a replacement cylinder head. I suggest having the pressure cap tested which means using a cooling system test kit. If the release pressure of the radiator cap has become too low, coolant will be expelled. Also have the radiator tested. If there is a pressure drop look for where the leakage occurs. Other common places of leakage are from core plugs on the engine block and the water pump. Leakage from the pump is many times only evident with the engine running, but be careful only to observe and not to touch anywhere dangerous. If there is a pressure drop but with no evidence of leakage from the parts already mentioned but no leakages are evident, check inside the cabin to be sure that the leakage is not from the cabin climate control. Pressure should be maintained for at least fifteen minutes a little above the pressure stamped onto the radiator pressure cap. If all else fails it is time to suspect the cylinder and cylinder head gasket. If the cylinder head gasket is blown it can sometimes result in a mixture of oil and coolant, evident from the changed colour of the engine oil, but can also leak into the cooling system and result in the symptoms you report. If the engine is petrol with an alloy head, skimming and a replacement of the gasket will usually sort out the problem. If it has a diesel engine with a cast head, the head may be cracked, requiring the cylinder head replacement. Regards John .

Jul 26, 2014 | 2002 Mitsubishi Pajero

1 Answer

2000 suzuki baleno losing water from cooling system


Try this refill with water to max level then start your engine and let it go hot then turn off engine and search for signs of water on the engine block on front and rear of it . the engine block have 3 or 4 seals made of metal that could be rusty and leaking water from them. If not then try to see on the pipes joints for leakage.

Nov 14, 2012 | Suzuki Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1993 Cavalier has coolant loss. It's losing the


you should have the cooling system pressure tested and inspected for a leak that may only show up under pressure.it could be a slow leak from the water pump,frost plug,head gasket which wouldn`t show up in the oil,heater core.it sounds like a small leak but this is the best way to start to find it.

Apr 02, 2012 | 1993 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

I have a 91 corolla with 78,000 miles. I've been losing coolant with no obvious leaks. Heat from the vents is sometimes hot, sometimes cool. I've checked and changed oil, and there's no coolant in the oil....


have the system pressure tested for a few hours, if pressure drops and no leaks are found you may have a head gasket leak and the coolant is going out the tailpipe

Oct 26, 2009 | 1991 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

Radiator overheating


The only thing missing from your narration is the water pump. Check to make sure that you are not losing coolant from the water pump. Make sure it is not leaking coolant. If there is evidence of leaking, the water pump is bad. You must take extreme caution when dealing with the cooling system (hot liquid under pressure; not a pleasant thought), but you can remove the radiator cap and start the engine. Check the coolant in the radiator for movement/circulation. If the water pump is functioning properly, there should be some visible sign of water/coolant circulation. The water pump may not be at fault, but with the other upgrades you made to the cooling system, some gunk (for lack of a better word) may have broken loose and clogged the ports in the water hose. You can also remove the hose at the water pump and check for anything clogging up the works. Really sorry for your trouble and I hope this helped. Best wishes.

Sep 14, 2009 | 1992 Chevrolet S-10

2 Answers

Car runs hot while idling, then cools down when you start driving. Have to add antifreeze but cant tell where it is leaking. could it be a heater valve busted or is it possibly the water pump?


It`s easy to see if the water pump is working just drain some of the fluid out of the radiator and look inside while vehicle is running NOTE due this only when vehicle is cold.
Know if it`s not flowing after it starts to warm up then either the thermostat is stuck closed or the water pump is bad i would start with the thermostat if i where you the other job is a lot harder and more expensive
Also the fluid disappearance could be caused by the fluid boiling out when it gets hot one last note check pressure cap on radiator for wear or cracks if bad replace hope this helped you.

Sep 10, 2009 | 2001 Jeep Cherokee

1 Answer

Lose of water


Hi,

One possible explanation is that the leak is small and the water escapes as steam. This then would lead to no immediately visible water leak under the vehicle and being small, the coolant system is still capable of preventing an overheat. Most likely spots would be the junction of the radiator hoses either to the radiator or to the engine side. One possible way to check is use your Toyota as you normally would but before shutting down the engine after a long drive, pop open the hood and check where steam or water might be leaking.

Hope this be of initial help/idea. Pls post back how things turned up or should you need additional information.

Good luck and kind regards. Thank you for using FixYa.

Aug 19, 2008 | 1994 Toyota Corolla

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