Question about 1996 Plymouth Grand Voyager

1 Answer

Ignition coil only fires on two cyl.replaced coil and does the same thing.Any ideas

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 850 Answers

It will be the distributor cap or leads or plugs!
Cheers Rob

Posted on Jul 20, 2009

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

2000 ford mustang code 453 and missfire cyl 5 where is the cyl


a haynes manual from a parts place will show you--or chec the condition of each plug wire-if one looks bad or falls apart--probly need to get all new wires /plugs

Dec 18, 2010 | 2000 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

Scanner said #4 cyl mis-fire changed #4 coil still reads #4 mis-fire any ideas


Replace the spark plug and if the problem still exsist replace the the ignition wire to the #4 cylinder.

Dec 01, 2010 | 2002 Ford Escape

2 Answers

Enging code came up on my 2004 dodge ram 1500 5.7 Hemi. Said ignition coil E was bad and that I had a misfire in cylinder 3. Replaced coil at cylinder 3 but it's still running rough. Is coil E somewhere...


Have you checked the spark plug itself? --- 5.7L Engine To Remove:
NOTE: Note spark plug cable original positions before removing.
dod_ram15_57_ign_coil.gif

dod_ram15_57_ign_coil_loc.gif

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Clean the area around the coil with compressed air.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Battery negative cable
    • Throttle body air intake tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Coil electrical connector by moving slide lock and pressing on release lock
    • Secondary high-voltage cable from coil
    • Mounting bolts
    • Coil from cylinder head opening by twisting
To Install:
  1. Clean area around spark plugs with compressed air.
  2. Apply dielectric grease to inside of boots.
  3. Install or connect the following:
    • Ignition coil to cylinder head opening
    • 2 mounting bolts
      1. Torque to: 106 inch lbs. (12 Nm)
    • Coil electrical connector
    • Cable to coil
    • Throttle body air tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Battery negative cable
---
Distributorless Ignition System General Information This vehicle uses two different types of ignition systems. The 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines do not use a conventional distributor. The 5.9L engine uses a conventional distributor. The ignition system is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) on all engines. Procedures in this section are for the 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines; please see the section on Distributor Ignition Systems for procedures for the 5.9L engine.
Distributorless ignition systems (EI) are used on many current engines. This system uses the waste spark method for distributing secondary voltage. In a waste spark system, an individual coil is used to fire one pair of engine cylinders simultaneously. These cylinders are known as companions, since each of their pistons is at TDC at the same time. On a typical V6 engine for example, cylinder 1 is at TDC compression while cylinder 4 is at TDC exhaust. This is also true of cylinders 2 and 5 as well as cylinder 3 and 6.
The cylinder on the compression stroke is known as the event cylinder, while the cylinder on the exhaust stroke is called the waste cylinder. Since secondary resistance is very low in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke, little voltage is required to fire the plug. For this reason, the majority of available voltage is consumed by the cylinder on the compression stroke.
One spark plug is attached to each end of the secondary coil winding via the spark plug wires. This series circuit arrangement causes one of the plugs to fire in a forward direction (center electrode to outer electrode), and the other spark plug to fire in a reverse direction (outer electrode to center electrode). The firing voltage requirements on the waste spark ignition are significantly greater than a traditional ignition system primarily because it takes 30% more energy to fire a plug reverse polarity. When a spark plug is fired backwards, it fires from the outer electrode to the center electrode. This is a high resistance path since the electrons do not flow as easily from a cold, dull surface such as the outer electrode to a hot, sharp surface like the center electrode.
Since the coil and plugs are arranged in a series circuit, a typical plug gap of .050" results in a total gap of .100" for the whole circuit that includes two spark plugs for the companion cylinders. The waste spark can overcome this added resistance by producing high secondary output voltages due to low resistance in the primary winding. Another reason higher secondary ignition voltage is required is cylinder pressure; specifically, the lack of it. Generally, event cylinders require 10 to 12-kV to initiate current flow across the spark plug gap, while only 2 - 3-kV is needed to fire the waste cylinder. Therefore, the air gap in the waste cylinder creates no more resistance than the rotor gap does in a conventional ignition system.
There are two different methods used for coil trigger. One method sends the crankshaft sensor signal directly to the ignition module to activate the coils, while the other sends the crankshaft sensor signal to the PCM and the PCM controls ignition operation either directly or through a separate ignition module.
Waste spark ignition advantages
  • It has fewer components than conventional distributor-type ignition systems.
  • No mechanical adjustments to set ignition timing.
  • No mechanical load (turning the distributor shaft).
  • No unwanted timing variations caused by gear lash or other worn distributor components.
Another advantage of waste spark is longer coil life. To illustrate this point, consider a six-cylinder engine with conventional ignition. At 3000 RPM, the coil must fire 9000 times per minute. This is calculated by dividing the engine speed by 2, since the cam turns at half crank speed, and then multiplying the distributor RPM by the total number of engine cylinders.
In contrast, the coils on a six-cylinder engine with waste spark only work a third as hard. This is because there's a coil for every two cylinders and each coil fires every crankshaft revolution. This means that at 3000 RPM, the coils only fire 3000 times per minute. This allows each coil to operate with less dwell (time that the coil is energized), resulting in less heat buildup and longer life.
Coil Over Plug System The coil over plug system was developed so that spark and spark timing could be better controlled on an individual cylinder basis. Each cylinder has an ignition coil mounted directly above the spark plug on the cylinder head cover. A short suppresser/connector replaces the spark plug wire and links the coil to the plug. There are different methods used for primary triggering. Some manufacturers use a combination coil/module, which means each coil has its own control circuit that is activated by the PCM. Others use remote mounted modules to trigger the coils.
Each individual coil is allowed to saturate while all other cylinders fire. For a V-8 engine, this allows a period of seven firing events for coil saturation, compared to three events for the same V-8 engine with a waste spark system. The coil over plug system also benefits from a minimum amount of energy lost, due to the resistance of spark plug wires.
Coil Near Plug System The coil near plug system also features multiple ignition coils. An ignition coil/module is mounted in proximity of each cylinder. There is a short length of spark plug wire between the coil and the spark plug.
Each ignition coil/module has its own control circuit and is activated sequentially by the PCM. All timing decisions are made by the PCM. This includes both ignition timing and duration of the spark.

Nov 03, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

1 Answer

Engine will not start. Coil is firing when


If coil is good and plugs are not - there's your problem. You can't have output of coil be good and plugs not work right. Something inbetween is wrong.

Dec 17, 2009 | 1986 Jeep CJ7

1 Answer

No fire to coil replace coal and tested ignition


Try checking the timing belt. They will cause this issue if they are even slightly streched or worn .... because theys slkip and make engine jump time. you can replace it and should solve the problem after you get it back in time.

Oct 18, 2009 | 1991 Geo Metro

1 Answer

1993 Chevy Cavalier 2.2 not firing on 2 cylinders


The reason I'm asking this is because a dual coil fires BOTH plugs at the same time. If one plug doesn't fire right, the other won't either, even to a point that neither does. Kepp the coils where they are and swap the plugs and wires and see if you have a change. Let me know

Jan 24, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

Dead cylinders 2003 sebring


it sounds like you may have the wires on the wrong coil. It should be #1 on the #4 coil, and the #3 wire on the #2 coil. you probably have them backwards so 1 and 3 are firing on the exhaust stroke.
the firing order is 1-3-4-2.
they should be hooked like this.
82c8490.jpg

3ddfc56.jpg

Jan 23, 2009 | 2003 Chrysler Sebring

2 Answers

Daewoo lanos 2000 car is misfiring and wont run properly firing on cylinders 1 and 4 misfiring


have you changed the ignition wires? perhaps firing order crossed? if not coil pack or ignition wires faulty how do you know it is not "FIREING" on 1 & 4 have you tested it with a spark tester tool???

Dec 23, 2008 | 2000 Daewoo Lanos

1 Answer

Daihatsu Mira 3 cyl 660cc No spark .I have checked plug and lead and fuses Any help appreciated. thanks rob.


Hi,

In my past dealings with these 3 cylinder engines, common faults (depending on the engine) are:
  • contact point pitting/burns (clean, scrape/replace);
  • rotor;
  • distributor cap;
  • ignition coil;
  • ignition coil ignition B+12 connector;
  • ignition coil loose ground.
Please check above mentioned components.

Hope this be of initial help/idea. Pls post back how things turned up or should you need additional information.

Good luck and kind regards. Thank you for using FixYa.

Aug 04, 2008 | Daihatsu Charade Cars & Trucks

Not finding what you are looking for?
1996 Plymouth Grand Voyager Logo

Related Topics:

54 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Plymouth Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

74896 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22095 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

7689 Answers

Are you a Plymouth Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...