Question about 2004 Toyota Camry

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Are there any front end alignment adjustments on a 2004 Camry other than toe-in?

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Yes
there all of the alignment capabilities available
At the top of the strut inside the engine compartment where the strut is mounted there are 3 bolts that are concentric so that by moving that mounting plate in a circle to new holes position the top of the strut is moved forward sideways and back covering all alignment positions of camber and castor
there is also alignment adjustments for the rear end and a professional alignment shop will always check and adjust that end first as it dictates the end result for a front end alignment

Posted on Dec 07, 2016

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How can I adjust toe-in?


Toe-in can be adjusted by adjusting you outer tie rod ends. I would not recommend adjusting them without alignment equipment though, with the exception of an emergency situation. If you go too far it will eat your tires in the front very quickly. On a 4 x 4 you are looking at around $60.00 for a 4-wheel alignment.

Feb 14, 2016 | 2003 GMC Envoy

1 Answer

How much to toe the front wheels


Toe in / out and all other wheel alignment parameters must be checked and adjusted by a specialist shop that uses specialized equipment to do the adjustments. To your question, yes, a front end alignment by a good auto workshop will bring them back in line.

Mar 01, 2015 | 2000 Lincoln Navigator

1 Answer

How do you adjust rear end toe


replace anything that was bent and then have the rear end alignment done at a wheel alignment specialist shop
any specialist shop when doing a front alignment should always check the rear first as it controls the accuracy of the front job

Aug 17, 2014 | 2002 Oldsmobile Intrigue

1 Answer

2004 GMC ENVOY whenever making a turn in drive or reverse tires drag on pavement


have the wheel alignment checked for correct camber and toe in- toe out adjustment. Check condition of wheel bearings and adjustment. .Check the front end suspension for wear

Apr 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Front tires wearing on inside very quickly on 1998 Mazda B2500


This may be due to the alignment being out of specification or possibly loose front end parts throwing your alignment out.

Jan 10, 2011 | 2004 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Front end was aligned and still has problem just purchased a used 2004 It pulls to the right severely and has tire wear


If the alignment shop did a good job, they either would have corrected the problem or identified exactly what it is that is causing it. Likely you have a bent front end component or the axle housing itself. Your ball joints should be checked for excessive play as well as all pivot points. The two aspects of an alignment that can cause a tire to wear are camber and toe-in (or out) Camber is not adjustable but you can get ball joints that are off-set to compensate for slight variations. If any part of the linkage is bent it can affect the toe in adjustment.
If the axle housing is bent and ball joints I recommended cannot compensate, the housing (complete differential) must be replaced.
I'd have it aligned again first, this time find a shop that does collision work. They are more familiar with that kind of problem and won't "steer" you wrong!!!.

Sep 26, 2010 | 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

Wear on the inside of front tires


Toe, I believe is tires pointed in or out like your toes. Caster, think about the casters on furniture that want to point straight in the direction of travel. Here is a good reference: http://www.aa1car.com/library/wheel_alignment.htm

What you are describing could be a toe in, toe out problem or it could be weak springs or overload condition.

If the guy/girl that told you there was no toe adjustment was a front end alignment mechanic, I would be inclined to believe them. If you have not spoken to a front end mechanic, you should.

Thanks for your question at FixYa.com

Feb 11, 2010 | 1999 Dodge Ram

3 Answers

Both rear tires are wearing on the inside.


you need an alignment. Its a toe-in, your tie rods need to adjusted. Check your tire pressure too.

Aug 20, 2009 | 1994 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight Regency

3 Answers

Wheel alignment


The main cause of steering wheel off-center is toe misalignment or rear axle misalignment. Toe can fall out of adjustment fairly easily as a result of daily driving, so you can imagine the effects of pounding it through 4WD trails on a regular basis.

Toe is designed to preload the steering linkage to remove play in the system. You can visualize toe angle from above; toe-in, or positive toe, is displayed when the leading edges of the tires are closer together than in the rear. Toe-out, or negative toe, is when the leading edges are farther apart. Zero toe is when wheels are pointed straight ahead and are parallel to each other. A slight amount of positive toe is preferred for most vehicles.

Improper toe angle isn't the only reason a steering wheel won't center. This phenomenon can also be caused by the steering linkage not being centered when toe was adjusted in the first place. This can be corrected by recentering the steering wheel and readjusting toe to proper specs. A bent steering arm or linkage component can also cause the steering wheel to be off-center. I've also seen this occur due to loose steering arm bolts. An off-center steering wheel contributes to tire wear because as the wheels are turned off dead center they turn toe out and increase tire scrubbing.

Sometimes an off-center steering wheel is accompanied by a wheel pull to one direction or the other and could be the result of a damaged component somewhere in the vehicle - a bent axlehousing could be throwing off the rear toe setting (rear toe setting is often overlooked). A bent frame or overly worn suspension bushings can also be the cause. If your wheel is off-center and also pulling, it can be as simple as incorrect tire pressure from side to side. Memory steer is another effect that is usually associated with an off-center steering wheel. This is when the steering wheel returns to an off-center position and can result in steering pull or drift after completing a turn. This can be caused by binding in the steering linkage as well as power steering system issues such as leaks or improper hydraulic pressure. Steering linkage bind occurs when proper geometry is not maintained in lifted vehicles.

Many 4x4s don't have factory provisions for adjusting caster and camber and rear toe and camber, but the front toe setting is easily adjusted. Toe is controlled by the steering linkage. By loosening the adjusters on the tie rod and shortening or lengthening the tie rod by turning the ends, toe angle can be adjusted. This should not be a substitute for regular professional wheel alignment jobs and is simply a tip that can be used to put off frequent trips to the alignment shop due to regular trips to the trail.
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Before determining toe angle and/or performing adjustments, it's a good idea to start the engine and turn the steering wheel side to side to relieve pressure in the system. Then, turn the wheels straight and shut off the engine. You should also roll the vehicle back and forth a few times between measurements.

Get someone to hold the other end of the measuring tape and measure the leading toe distance. This is the distance between the leading edges of the front tires. You'll compare the results to the distance between the trailing edges of the tires directly opposite from where you took the first measurement.

The higher number will indicate toe direction: higher number in leading edge indicates toe out; higher number at trailing edge displays toe in. Larger-than-stock tires require more positive toe for best results.

Once the necessary measurements are performed to determine what the current toe setting is, you can loosen the bolts on the tie-rod adjuster sleeve so that the tie-rod ends can be rotated. Don't forgot to tighten the adjusters when you're done as damage or injury could result.

The tie-rod ends thread into the tie rod. The ends can be threaded in or out of the tie rod to make the assembly longer or shorter. Longer creates more toe out; shorter toe in. Don't make huge adjustments all at once. It's best to adjust and measure a few times to achieve appropriate setting.
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I hope this helps you if you were looking to do a toe alignment yourself if you have decent knowledge of component location on a jeep.

Jan 30, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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