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Range rover sport 2016 model looses coolant , pressure tested , completed cylinder leakage/ block test no visible sings of coolant leaking .had this before ?

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: 2002 freelander coolant leak

My coolant leaked out and on top there is a large hard plastic container, I had to replace it, that stopped my coolant leak.

Posted on Oct 20, 2008

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  • 99 Answers

SOURCE: I have water leaking from

Hi it has the classic symptoms of a failed water pump, when stationary no water/coolant is running around the engine hence cold air, when driving its forcing the water/coolant around the engine giving the warm air,, solution have the water pump changed before the head gasket blows, Hope this helps

Posted on Dec 04, 2008

  • 316 Answers

SOURCE: Coolant overflowing out of expansion tank no boil no steam

As you've stated driving around town it's fine, and everything is working well. For the symptoms, there are 2 possible causes:
1. Your cooling fans are not working.
2. Your radiator needs to be replaced.
I'm sure you can determine which it is, and I wish you luck on your repair.

Posted on Jun 02, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Overheating Leaking coolant completely out overnight Land Rover

I've heard other stories about the coolant leaking then the vehcile needing a head gasket replacement? Ask your mechanic, not just any mechanic will work on these vehicles.

Posted on Aug 17, 2009

  • 6982 Answers

SOURCE: No boil or steam when coolant overflows after shutting off engine

The only real way of checking for warpage on any head is by using a bar that extends from corner to corner on the head. The bar must be certified as straight (you can actually buy one from a tool dealer) since you likely will have little use for it, you can also have a good machine shop check that. Additionally, you should have had the heads magnafluxed (crack checked). The deck on the block should also be carefully examined and cleaned.
You are on the right track if you are going to do another hydrocarbon test. That will verify if you are getting a proper seal at the head gaskets or have any other seal problems (like cracks).
It seems as if you have done a very careful job and I know you don't want to take it apart again. The things you mentioned though do appear to point to exhaust driving coolant from the engine.
You can check the actual antifreeze mix with a simple ball type hydrometer. Anything except 50/50 will change the boil point of the mixture in a direction that isn't good. One thing I'd check is that you may still have an air pocket in the system somewhere. Make sure when filling that the heater is on high heat. One trick for getting the T stat to open without an air bind is to turn the engine off as soon as the temp approaches the opening point (195 (f)) then re-starting it in about three to five minutes, the engine temp will continue to rise during the time it is off but there will be no flow, allowing air to escape without fighting the coolant flow. Once re-started, add coolant slowly so the stat does not close again but add just fast enough so it does not overheat. One other item...If you need to take it apart again, don't use any kind of steel shim gaskets for the heads. Though a composite gasket will many times lower compression a bit, they also seal better. I use fel pro blue gaskets in everything. Unless I was careless or something got by me (not often) I never had a problem with any engine I ever built or repaired. The only application where I did not use them was in fuel engines where they were "o" ringed with stainless wire and used solid copper gaskets. (way different than a street engine!!!)
Have that hydrocarbon test done ASAP. No sense messing with it 'till you have that squared away!
Good Luck!!!

Posted on Jul 11, 2010

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2 Answers

Coolant disappears, but why no visible leakage?


You need to get your hands on a coolant pressure tester and pump the system up to 16 psi to test for leaks. Pull spark plugs, disable fuel pump relay and check for seepage into the combustion chambers, after the test crank the motor over and see if it comes out the spark plug holes, possible bad head gasket, also check to see if heater core is leaking out the ac condensation tube. Rent the tool, if possible, they also sell a shop air style too that can be adjusted to keep 16psi at the fill reservoir all the time instead of pumping and pumping up the system with the hand pump tester.

Mar 05, 2016 | 2005 Volkswagen Passat

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Things to test when checking cooling system


<p>A leak detection additive is available through the parts department that can be added to cooling system. The additive is highly visible under ultraviolet light (black light) (1). Pour one ounce of additive into cooling system. Place heater control unit in HEAT position. Start and operate engine until the radiator upper hose is warm to touch. Aim the commercially available black light tool at components to be checked. If leaks are present, black light will cause the additive to glow a bright green color.<br /> <p>The black light can be used in conjunction with a pressure tester to determine if any external leaks exist .<br /> <p><b>PRESSURE TESTER METHOD</b><br />he engine should be at normal operating temperature. Recheck the system cold if the cause of coolant loss is not located during the warm engine examination. <br /> WARNING <p> HOT, PRESSURIZED COOLANT CAN CAUSE INJURY BY SCALDING.<br /> <p>Carefully remove the radiator pressure cap from the filler neck and check coolant level. Push down on cap to disengage it from the stop tabs. Wipe the inside of filler neck and examine the lower inside sealing seat for nicks, cracks, paint, dirt and solder residue. Inspect the radiator-to- reserve/overflow tank hose for internal obstructions. Insert a wire through the hose to be sure it is not obstructed.<br /> <p>Inspect cams on the outside of filler neck. If the cams are damaged, seating of the pressure cap valve and tester seal will be affected.<br /> <p>Attach pressure tester (7700 or an equivalent) to radiator filler neck (1).<br /> <p>Operate tester pump to apply 103.4 kPa (15 psi) pressure to system. If hoses enlarge excessively or bulge while testing, replace as necessary. Observe the gauge pointer and determine the condition of the cooling system according to the following criteria:<br /> <p><b>Holds Steady:</b> If the pointer remains steady for two minutes, serious coolant leaks are not present in system. However, there could be an internal leak that does not appear with normal system test pressure. If it is certain that coolant is being lost and leaks cannot be detected, inspect for interior leakage or perform Internal Leakage Test. Refer to <a>INTERNAL LEAKAGE INSPECTION</a>.<br /> <p><b>Drops Slowly:</b> Indicates a small leak or seepage is occurring. Examine all connections for seepage or slight leakage with a flashlight. Inspect radiator, hoses, gasket edges and heater. Seal small leak holes with a Sealer Lubricant (or equivalent). Repair leak holes and inspect system again with pressure applied.<br /> <p><b>Drops Quickly:</b> Indicates that serious leakage is occurring. Examine system for external leakage. If leaks are not visible, inspect for internal leakage. Large radiator leak holes should be repaired by a reputable radiator repair shop.<br /> <a></a> <p><b>INTERNAL LEAKAGE INSPECTION</b><br /> <p>Remove engine oil pan drain plug and drain a small amount of engine oil. If coolant is present in the pan, it will drain first because it is heavier than oil. An alternative method is to operate engine for a short period to churn the oil. After this is done, remove engine dipstick and inspect for water globules. Also inspect the transmission dipstick for water globules and the transmission fluid cooler for leakage.<br /> <br /> WARNING <p> WITH RADIATOR PRESSURE TESTER TOOL INSTALLED ON RADIATOR, DO NOT ALLOW PRESSURE TO EXCEED 145 KPA (21 PSI). PRESSURE WILL BUILD UP QUICKLY IF A COMBUSTION LEAK IS PRESENT. TO RELEASE PRESSURE, ROCK TESTER FROM SIDE TO SIDE. WHEN REMOVING TESTER, DO NOT TURN TESTER MORE THAN 1/2 TURN IF SYSTEM IS UNDER PRESSURE.<br /> <p>Operate the engine without the pressure cap on the radiator until the thermostat opens. Attach a Pressure Tester to filler neck. If pressure builds up quickly it indicates a combustion leak exists. This is usually the result of a cylinder head gasket leak or crack in engine. Repair as necessary.<br /> <p>If there is not an immediate pressure increase, pump the Pressure Tester. Do this until indicated pressure is within system range of 110 kPa (16 psi). Fluctuation of gauge pointer indicates compression or combustion leakage into cooling system.<br /> <p>Because the vehicle is equipped with a catalytic converter, <b>do not</b> remove spark plug cables or short out cylinders to isolate compression leak.<br /> <p>If the needle on the dial of pressure tester does not fluctuate, race engine a few times to check for an abnormal amount of coolant or steam. This would be emitting from exhaust pipe. Coolant or steam from exhaust pipe may indicate a faulty cylinder head gasket, cracked engine cylinder block or cylinder head.<br /> <p>A convenient check for exhaust gas leakage into cooling system is provided by a commercially available Block Leak Check tool. Follow manufacturers instructions when using this product.<br /> <p><b>COMBUSTION LEAKAGE TEST - WITHOUT PRESSURE TESTER</b><br /> <p>DO NOT WASTE reusable coolant. If the solution is clean, drain the coolant into a clean container for reuse.<br /> <br /> WARNING <p> DO NOT REMOVE CYLINDER BLOCK DRAIN PLUGS OR LOOSEN RADIATOR DRAINCOCK WITH SYSTEM HOT AND UNDER PRESSURE. SERIOUS BURNS FROM COOLANT CAN OCCUR.<br /> <p>Drain sufficient coolant to allow thermostat removal(Refer to 7 - COOLING - STANDARD PROCEDURE). Remove accessory drive belt or (Refer to 7 - COOLING/ACCESSORY DRIVE/DRIVE BELTS - REMOVAL).<br /> <p>Add coolant to radiator to bring level to within 6.3 mm (1/4 in) of the top of the thermostat housing.<br /> <br /> CAUTION <p> Avoid overheating. Do not operate engine for an excessive period of time. Open draincock immediately after test to eliminate boil over.<br /> <p>Start engine and accelerate rapidly three times, to approximately 3000 rpm while observing coolant. If internal engine combustion gases are leaking into cooling system, bubbles will appear in coolant. If bubbles do not appear, internal combustion gas leakage is not present.

on Jan 20, 2011 | Subaru Legacy Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to bleed cooling sysem


Just drive and add coolant from time to time. Carefully open the filler cap. If coolant keep missing you may have a leak. If you see no leakage you can see for white smoke in the exhaust. if pressure keeps building up in the system you have a cracked cylinder head or a bad head gasket.

Apr 10, 2014 | 2000 Land Rover Range Rover

1 Answer

Small amount of milk in oil


To check whether the coolant is entering into the engine oil or not, do the following.
- Park the car on a level floor.
- Check engine oil level on the dip stick and mark it with nail polish. Let it dry. Confirm the oil level. Put the dip stick back.
- Apply about 10 psi external pressure to the coolant system, while keeping caps in place.
NOTE: It is advised to use the coolant system tester. In case the tester is not available, ask any technician to do it for you. Or you can use a bicycle pump with gauge installed on it to pressure the system up to 10 psi. The system should held the pressure up to 30 Seconds.
- If the pressure is maintained for 30 Seconds every thing is good at this time. Ensure that the air is not leaking through your external pump system with which you are testing the system.
If the pressure drops, there will be a leakage some where. Either external or internal. External leakage can easily be observed while carefully examining the hose pipes, clips and joints on the engine.
Internal leakage can be determined by checking the engine oil level again.
- Take out the dip stick and inspect the oil level. If the engine oil level increases it confirm the internal leakage.
- Internal coolant leakage could be due to:-
1. Cylinder head bolts loose or under torqued. (Re-Torque the bolts).
2. Burnt cylinder head gasket. (Always use original spares).
3. Cylinder and head surfaces warped. (Surface grind the cylinder head on surface grinding machine and replace the gasket).
4. Any corroded lid in the cylinder block or cylinder head assembly.
5. Oil cooler, if any.
If the test report of above mentioned procedure is found to be OK, start the engine, pull up dip stick a little, open breather tube from the tappet cover, keep it open and keep the engine start for as long as the water vapors coming out of these points disappear and the engine oil will become clear to its original color.
At times it happens that immediately after replacing the cylinder head gasket some coolant may flow into the engine unavoidably and keep contaminating the engine oil for quite some time.
Hope that works.
Thank you for visiting Fixya.

Mar 03, 2014 | Chevrolet Cobalt Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Built up pressure inside radiator and coolant come


Check for a blown head gasket .or a cracked block

Oct 12, 2013 | 2002 Isuzu Rodeo Sport

1 Answer

Leaks coolant by the transmission hosing


Pressure test the system so you can see exactly where the coolant is coming out. You might have a leak at the radiator seam.

Dec 19, 2011 | 2004 Land Rover Range Rover

1 Answer

Is a compression test a conclusive way to check for a leaking head gasket? My 99 honda civic (D16Y7) Is losing coolant and ruining radiator caps from the coolant obviously getting too hot. I did a...


Check for milky oil
It may help to have the radiator cleaned and flushed, and a new thermostat installed, the coolant may be going out the overflow
Not certain how it ruins radiator caps, they hold about 5psi in the radiatior and let excess pressure into the overflow, then when the engine cools, allow coolant to s uck back form the overflow tank

May 27, 2011 | 1999 Honda Civic

1 Answer

Range rover 2002 model 4.4i petrol engine, every 50-100km, losing 2litres water needs constant topping up. no sign of leaks around head gasket or rad. Inside carpet is dry so not heater matrix. what is...


It appears that you have a minor leak at where a hose attaches to an engine or radiator pipe. When the engine is hot, any small leak will evaporate quickly and therefore not be seen. As the coolant heats up it will expand into the overflow tank but once the engine is stopped the extra heat build up will force the coolant out the leaking joint. As the engine cools, the leak prevents the coolant from being sucked back from the overflow tank.

Check all hoses and clamps including heater hoses and those pesky little bypass hoses in the cooling system for a good tight fit and replace any hoses that have gone hard or have become soft and stretched. Those spring type hose clamps tend to be less effective in clamping as the hoses age. Worm drive ones are the best to use.

If unsure take vehicle to a cooling system specialist and have them do a pressure test and more thorough diagnosis.

If problem persists, then it could indicate a problem with the head gasket (Usually caused by allowing engine to become excessively overheated when cooling system has run dry) allowing very hot high pressure combustion gases into the engine water jacket, which super heats the coolant in the engine block, which then boils off, and is released via the cap or any leaks. If the head gasket is really bad it will leak water into the cylinders and into the oil in the sump. This is indicated by an emulsion of water and oil mix on the dipstick. You will also see white smoke (water vapour) from the exhaust.

Oct 12, 2010 | 2003 Land Rover Range Rover

1 Answer

1999 Land Rover Discovery II engine miss


Observe the engine running in the dark to see if there are any spark jumps from the wires or coil, you may have a carbon track.....

Feb 16, 2010 | 2001 Land Rover Discovery Series II

2 Answers

I have a 1990 gmc 1500 5 speed that is overheating and leaking coolant i changed the radiator hoses,thermostat, and water pump, and i know the leak is not coming from the radiator what do i do next?


any external leaks?coolant stains? would check the intake for signs of leakage also the heater hose quick connect.also check the sides of the block for leakage from the core plugs.

Jan 02, 2010 | 1990 GMC C1500

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