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How do i fix power window, motor works wont go up 1994 town car,drivers front


Replace the regulator and motor. Motor has a heat sensor in it. To many amps going up causes heat. It shuts down. The regulator is worn out also.

May 23, 2015 | 1994 Lincoln Town Car

1 Answer

How do u take off the starter


3.2L Engines

1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions section.
2. Remove or disconnect the following: Negative battery cableHeated Oxygen (HO2S) sensor connectorsExhaust front pipeHeat shieldStarter wiring connectorsStarter motor
Negative battery cable
Heated Oxygen (HO2S) sensor connectors
Exhaust front pipe
Heat shield
Starter wiring connectors
Starter motor

To install:

1. Install or connect the following: Starter motor. Tighten the bolts to 30 ft. lbs. (40 Nm).Starter wiring connectorsHeat shieldExhaust front pipeHeated Oxygen (HO2S) sensor connectorsNegative battery cable
Starter motor. Tighten the bolts to 30 ft. lbs. (40 Nm).
Starter wiring connectors
Heat shield
Exhaust front pipe
Heated Oxygen (HO2S) sensor connectors
Negative battery cable

Hope helps (remember to rate this).

Nov 08, 2010 | 1999 Isuzu Rodeo

1 Answer

Cooling fans not running


HI. I have a very thorough, step by step procedure that will help troubleshoot this issue. follow carefully, to isolate the problem, Use extreme caution when preforming this inspection procedure.



1.Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.


2.Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.


3.Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.


4.Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.


5.Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.


6.Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.


7.Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Aug 24, 2010 | 2000 Toyota Sienna

1 Answer

My radiator fan is not coming on even when the a/c is running.


HI. I have a very thorough, step by step procedure that will help troubleshoot this issue. follow carefully, to isolate the problem, Use extreme caution when preforming this inspection procedure.


Step1

Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.

Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.

Step3

Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.

Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.

Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.

Step6
Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.

Step7
Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Nov 07, 2009 | 1993 Saturn SL2

1 Answer

Cooling fan is not working


HI. I have a very thorough, step by step procedure that will help troubleshoot this issue. follow carefully, to isolate the problem, Use extreme caution when preforming this inspection procedure.


Step1
Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.

Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.

Step3

Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.

Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.

Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.

Step6

Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.

Step7

Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Nov 05, 2009 | 2001 Volkswagen Beetle

1 Answer

Cooling fan is not coming on . the fuse is intact.


HI. Here is a step by step troubleshooting guide that will help you isolate the issue. use caution, and follow carefully.

Step1
Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.
Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.
Step3
Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.
Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.
Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.
Step6
Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.
Step7
Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Oct 21, 2009 | 1991 Honda Civic

1 Answer

2003 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER AWD, THE RAD. FANS DON'T COME ON WHEN THEY SHOULD. I HAVE PUT NEW CONTROL MUDULE, TEMP. SENDING UNIT, THERMOSTAT AND THEY STILL DON'T WORK. WHEN THE CAR IS RUNNING AND I TAP ON...


Use this thorough testing procedure to troubleshoot this issue.

Step1
Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.
Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.
Step3
Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.
Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.
Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.
Step6
Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.
Step7
Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Aug 27, 2009 | 2003 Mitsubishi Outlander

1 Answer

How do you replace the oxygen sensors on a 1995 merc sable with a 3.0 ltr motor


they just unscrew from the exhaust pipe.

Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) SPECIAL SERVICE TOOL(S) REQUIRED Description Tool Number Oxygen Sensor Wrench T94P-9472-A
Removal and Installation
  1. Disconnect battery ground cable (14301). Refer to Section 14-01 .
  1. On 3.0L (4V) engine remove cowl extension and right side of leaf screen.
  1. Disconnect engine control sensor wiring (12A581) from heated oxygen sensors (HO2S) (9F472). Do not remove harness connectors from the brackets.
  1. Raise vehicle on hoist. Refer to Section 00-02 .
  1. NOTE: If excessive force is needed to remove a heated oxygen sensor, lubricate the heated oxygen sensor with penetrating oil prior to removal.

    Remove heated oxygen sensors from exhaust manifolds (9430) using Oxygen Sensor Wrench T94P-9472-A.
  1. To install, reverse Removal procedure. Apply a coating of anti-sieze compound to threads of heated oxygen sensor. Tighten heated oxygen sensors to 34-46 Nm (26-34 lb-ft).


    Heated Oxygen Sensors—3.0L (4V) Engine


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May 02, 2009 | 1995 Mercury Sable

1 Answer

Runs hot replaced radiator fan motor and heat sensor, fan still won't run


I own a 1997 caravan and had the same problem, turns out there is a fan relay switch mounted on the inside of the drivers side frame rail under the battery tray.. cost me 80.00 hope this helps..

Apr 21, 2009 | 1992 Dodge Caravan

1 Answer

Cooling fan won't come on.


HI. I have prepared some steps for you to follow.This will aid you will the troubleshooting.


Step1 Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail. Step2 Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow. Step3 Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector. Step4 Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing. Step5 Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan. Step6 Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one. Step7 Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Please rate and god bless..

Mar 21, 2009 | 1992 Dodge Spirit

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