Question about 2002 Honda CR-V

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My 2002 CRV has 103,000 miles....recently my left rear brakes would not release after stopping, causing the pads to samoke after a short drive....flushed the brake fluids....did nothing.....so my mechanic changes both calipers on the rear and also changed the rubber brake line to the left rear......is this a routine situation or should I expect the same with the front? I have owned 8 Hondas in the past 20 years , all had very high mileage and never experienced this problem.

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Is the problems fix on your car? if its not, take it back and have them fix it correctly and it is a safety factor. to answer your question, its Yes and No, its not a common thing with any car, but it can happens to any cars. some car will experience the same problems with low miles and some with very high miles. The caliper which has a working piston pushing the pad in and out causing lots of heat and friction therefor causing the piston and the seal to fail over time due to heat; on the race car its glow red like a stove. when you release the brake the pressure is then release from the line and the piston retract back along with the pad although in this case the piston did not retract and stay extended pushing the pad to the disc causing the wheel to smoke, it like driving with emergency brake on. Again is not a common thing but it does happens and can happens to any cars. hope that help...

Posted on Jul 16, 2009

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2002 Ford Excursion 7.3 4x4 rear brakes getting smoking hot. Noticed it on driver side first. Assumed the rotor was sticking, replaced it and the hose. Relaxed pads and found the pads on passenger side...


There are a number of issues that can cause overheating disc brakes. Disc brakes, when released, separate from the disc by the action of the rotor moving between them (since no rotor is perfectly true, there is a small about of wobble and it pushes the pads away from the rotor surface). Things that can cause this to go wrong are:

  1. Caliper pistons that have rust rings that cause sticking. This most often will happen right after or shortly after replacing old, work out pads with new ones. Because the caliper piston was extended out farther with the worn pads, its surface may get rusty. This rust can cause sticking when the piston is pushed back into the bore with the new, thicker pads.
  2. Caliper slide bolts will rust and get sticky, not allowing the caliper to release properly and re-center itself on the rotor. What you often see here is that one pad (inner or outer) is totally worn out and the other seems normal.
  3. Rusty brake lines/caliper internals can cause restrictions in the flow of brake fluid and hold pressure after the brake pedal is released.
It is highly recommended that whenever you change your brake pads, you replace the caliper slide bolts use a new brake hardware kit when reinstalling. The additional cost is almost always saved in longer brake pad life, and fewer complications.

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When I turn left my brakes repeatedly grab and release. What could be the cause?


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My mechanic tells me I need rear brake pads and rotors as a cost of $ 320.00. I have 60000 miles on the car. I can't believe I need brakes so soon with low mileage.


The way in which a car has driven has a very direct impact on how long brake pads will last before they have to be replaced. For example, if you spend most of your time driving long distances on the highway, you're using your brakes much less often than in stop and go urban driving. I have seen cars that need brake jobs every 75,000 miles; I've seen similar cars, with different drivers and different driving routines, go 25,000 miles between brake jobs.

I would not be surprised at all if the front brake pads (and possibly rotors) of your Accord needed to be replaced at 60k miles of typical mixed driving. I am, however, somewhat surprised that your rear brakes need service at this point. The front brakes of a car typically provide much more of a car's stopping power than the rear brakes (it's a physics thing), and so they generally wear much more quickly than the rear brakes. All that said, I recently had to replace the rear brake pads and rotors of a 2002 Passat that had only 51,000 miles on the odometer. This car's pads were worn down to the metal, and one of the rotors was badly scored. Upon speaking with the owner of the car, though, things made slightly more sense. First, the car was equipped with a very active ABS braking system, which decreases front wheel braking and increases rear wheel braking depending on road conditions. As a result, the rear brakes of that car were used much more heavily than in the "average" car. Second, and more obviously, the owner admitted to forgetting to release her parking brake several times before driving off, sometimes going several miles before realizing her mistake. The emergency brake system on most cars engages the rear brakes, and driving off with those brakes still on will put a huge amount of wear on those pads in a very short distance.

One final, distant, thought is that it's possible that your rear calipers have gotten "sticky" and are not fully releasing after they have been engaged. Accumulated moisture on the brake pistons and piston channel walls can leave rust spots that hang up piston travel, leading to this condition. At the same time, it would be unusual for both brakes on the same axle to develop this problem at the same time--this typically happens one brake caliper at a time, and you notice the condition when you car begins pulling to one side when you brake or even after you release your brakes.

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It sounds like there is a problem with the current calipers, it would be cheaper to try replacing the current ones with a new one NOT FROM HONDA. buy an aftermarket caliper and try that. Dealerships will try to screw you over and take money from you when its not necessary.

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