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Setting the timing in a 2002 Toyota Sienna.

While setting the timing in a 2002 Toyota Sienna how do you differentiate between the compression and the exhaust stroke on No. 1 cylinder, after the crankshaft pulley has been removed?

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There are marks on cam gears and t-belt cover that will only line up on # 1 fire. Here you leave the belt and start tearing down. The new belt has marks that can only go one way and the crank does not have to be aligned perfecltly.

Posted on Jul 15, 2009

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How do i correct timing chain and gears installed correctly but #1 cylinder was in wrong position


What you are saying cannot be true. IF the timing chain and gears were installed correctly, the #1 cylinder would be in the correct position. Most likely what you have done is that you have the crankshaft in the wrong position. The crankshaft rotates twice for every rotation of the camshaft. Thus, the crankshaft timing mark will align with the camshaft mark twice - once with #1 cylinder TDC on the compression stroke, and once with the #1 cylinder TDC on the exhaust stroke. You probably have the crankshaft on the exhaust stroke when it should be on the compression stroke. You will need to take the chain off and rotate the crankshaft one full revolution and reinstall the chain. Best guess, IMHO.

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After top dead center what valve starts opening number 1 intake or number 1 exhaust?


It depends on which TDC you are talking about, compression TDC or exhaust TDC. On the compression stroke, no valves will open after TDC-this is when combustion has occured, the power stroke. When the piston reaches bottom and starts up on the exhaust stroke, then exhaust valve will open. At TDC of exhaust stroke, exhaust valve will be closed, and the intake valve will then open as piston is moving down.
If you have the intake valve opening right after TDC, you are on the exhaust stroke of that cylinder. The exhaust valve is only open during upward movement of the piston on the exhaust stroke. Immediately after TDC of exhaust stroke, the intake will open as the piston travels downward.

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1987 toyota 22re. head was taken off by siomeone who did not mark or align anything. I need to know how to get it on the compression stroke.


With the head off, the bottom end doesn't know compression from exhaust from squat. The crank just keeps pushing the pistons up and down. You set the #1 cylinder at the top of travel, the mark on the pointer scale must be at zero, then when you have the head on with the camshaft sprocket on its mark, and the timing belt or chain on, you should be at TDC on the compression stroke. To verify, both valves on #1 should be closed-the camshaft lobes for #1 should be more or less pointing up-away from the valves.
See? The valve train is what determines compression stroke vs. exhaust stroke. On compression, both valves are closed. On the exhaust stroke, the exhaust valve will be open. As long as you get the camshaft sprocket on the right mark and the crank sprocket at zero-or on its mark-the timing should be right.

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Is a mazda protege es 2000 1.6l pump gaz changed,spark plug is new , coil is ok, the mark for timing is ok (2cam)but not sure for crank mark i know is the pin on the crank supposely up ,the motor turn but...


If I understanding right, you set the timing on your mazda. you may have set timing on the exhaust stroke. Rotate the crankshaft again with the belts off and realign the timing marks. You need the number 1 cylinder top dead center on the compression stroke not the exhaust stroke. Also take off distributor cap and make sure rotor is pointing toward number 1 cylinder spark plug wire when at top dead center. Hope this is what you were asking.

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Step by step instructions on timing belt installation 2000 hyundai accent


Right, so you have two TDC's-the exhaust stroke and the compression stroke Top Dead Center-and both occurr when the crank hits the zero mark on the timing scale.
Always set timing with the number one cylinder at TDC on the compression stroke. How do you know which is which? If you have a distributor, the rotor will be pointing to number one cylinder tower, when at TDC of the compression stroke. If you are on the exhaust stroke's TDC, the rotor will be pointing just opposite of number one .
If you don't have a distributor, look at the valves for cylinder one under the valve cover. If at TDC of compression stroke, both valves will be closed. At TDC of exhaust stroke, the exhaust valve will be open.
You can also find the compression stroke on number one by pulling out the spark plug for number one, and either put a wrench or socket on the crank pulley and turn it clockwise, or use the starter and bump the engine over in short bumps. Put your finger or thumb over the spark plug hole and feel for the pressure to build up. As soon as you feel pressure on your finger, (if turning by hand, pressure will be slight, but you can feel it) you are on the compression stroke. Stop bumping the starter and turn the crank on around by hand until the zero mark lines up on the timing scale-TDC of compression stroke! The exhaust stroke will have no pressure build-up as the piston comes to top-because the exhaust valve is open. On the compression stroke, both valves are closed as the piston travels up the cylinder.

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Put on a new timing belt now it wont start


I need some clarification. Did you replace the belt because it broke? If so you may need to replace the head. The problem is if the belt breaks when your moving it usually damages the head and thus needs to be replaced.

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What does the cam sensor do?


It sends a signal to the Powertrain/Engine Control Module (ECM or PCM) so that the control module knows when to fire the fuel injectors.

Each cylinder in a 4-stroke engine reaches top dead center in its travel 2 times for every time the cylinder fires. Once on the compression stroke and once on the exhaust stroke. The ignition and fuel injector timing is based off of the position of #1 cylinder. If the computer knows what position #1 cylinder is in, then it can accurately calculate what position all of the other cylinders are in. The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) tells the controller when #1 cylinder is at top dead center. The cam position sensor (CMP) tells it if #1 is on the compression stroke or the exhaust stroke. With the data from these two sensors, both injector and ignition timing can be acurrately controlled.

I hope this helps you to understand.

Mar 24, 2012 | Ford Escort Cars & Trucks

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Where's the bank 1 sensor 1 located at my toyota sienna 2007, i know there are 3 sensors in bank 1 and 1 sensor in bank 2 if you can give me the image or view where they are located i really appreciate...


O2 sensors location is broken down like this. The bank refers to which side of the motor the sensor is on. Bank 1 is the same side of the engine as the number one cylinder. Bank 2 is the other side of the motor. Sensor refers to either before the cat or after the cat.

Bank 1 sensor 1 would be the O2 on the side of the motor that the number one cylinder is on and before the cat.

The number one cylinder is on the back side of the motor (the side closest to the firewall). The O2 sensor will be in the exhaust pipe near the exhaust manifold.

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2002 grand am 3.4l 1 newhead have compression only on cylinder 3 and 1 and 5 zero compression tried putting oil in no luck?


well thats good. if you put in oil and there is compression that tells you that your rings are bad and neeed rebuilt. i would check your timing, its possible that the exhaust or intake valve is open on the compression stroke letting the air escape.

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