Question about 2002 Mazda 626

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At first the ac stopped cooling. then the car overheated with the ac off. there appears to be no loss of radiator coolant

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Turn your engine on with the A/C on high. Watch your cooling fans mounted behind the radiator to make sure they are running. If they're not running, you have something wrong in the electrical side of the fan system. The cooling fans are essential for cooling as they pull air through the radiator when the vehicle is not moving fast enough to cool the coolant. The problem probably lies in a relay, so replace the high speed fan relay with one you know works but is not essential for moment (rear window defrost or something similar) and put that in the relay spot for the high speed fans. If the fans kick on now, you need to replace your relay and this will probably also fix your overheating.

Posted on Jul 12, 2009

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Car overheating causing fluid to come out of the reservoir


Change your thermostat. Ensure that your radiator fan is running at idle. See if your heat blows warm or not when the engine is warmed. if the heat is clod, then you have no water circulation in your engine. either the thermostat isnt opening up, or there is a blockage in your cooling system.

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My car has white smoke coming from the exhaust


he causes of white exhaust smoke can vary; however, it is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke.
One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
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Nov 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I was screwing cap back on radiator due to it overheating and it broke off as n now there's a whole can I still drive it


No, you can't. If you cannot effectively seal the cooling system with the radiator cap, coolant will not pressurize and flow thru the cooling system as intended. It will heat up, expand, and flow out of the hole, resulting in loss of coolant, overheating, and eventually, engine failure.

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1 Answer

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There are a number of possibilities:
1. Not enough anti-freeze in the cooling system. Anti-freeze not only protects against freezing, but also boil-over.
2. Defective thermostat. If it is stuck closed or partially so, it can cause overheating.
3. Clogged radiator.
4. Defective water pump.
5. Blown head gasket.

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1 Answer

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Have you checked for coolant loss or leakage ? If OK then check water temp sensor, both itself and its fuse/wiring. Red.

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3 Answers

Engine overheating i have replaced the radiator has plenty of water


replace thermostat.then bleed coolant system, this is how you do it.fill the cooling coolant system with 50 / 50 dexcool and water to raise boiling point,straight water will evaporate boil away cause engine to overheat catch fire thats why you need 50 / 50 mixture antifreeze and water.to bleed coolant system first fill coolant system until coolant stay at the full cold mark on the the coolant overflow jug,then you start engine allow it to idle,place the heater and ac control in any ac setting except max and the temperature control to the highest setting,run engine until lower hose to water pump is hot. with the engine hot run the engine speed up to 3000 rpm and allow it return to idle, repeat this 5 times. slowly open the bleed valve on the thermostat housing or look for bleed valve at the water pump heater hose.open bleed valve for 15 seconds to expel any trapped air.then top off the coolant as necessary,and when top radiator hose hot thermostat open up.keep adding cooling to overflow until coolant level stop at full cold mark dont over fill coolant.if engine seem like overheating while looking at cooling gauge turn off engine wait a while until cool off add more coolant until coolant level stay stable and dont drop any.when open radiator overflow cap use large rag over the radiator cap to keep from getting scald open radiator cap a little at a time but dont open radiator cap until engine cool down first.replace the radiator overflow cap, thermostat,and engine coolant temperature sensor and check the cooling fans fuses and relays see what happens.

Aug 18, 2012 | 1998 Oldsmobile Intrigue

1 Answer

I may have added too much coolant. After adding it, I drove for about 15 minutes. A few hours later, the tempurature gauge light came on. I check the coolant level again and there was nothing in the...


No, you can't add too much coolant. Rather, it does not hurt anything if you do. Did you add it to the radiator, or to the overflow tank?

Let it cool, then remove the radiator cap, and if needed, add coolant to the radiator. Put the cap back on, and fill the overflow tank to the "full - cold" line. Start it and run it a few minutes and look for leaks. If you find no leaks, drive it for a day or two, then let it cool and check it again. If it is down a lot (without overheating), you have a leak somewhere. If you lose enough coolant, that will make it overheat. However, if it overheats, that can cause loss of coolant, when you stop the car, you will see steam and smell coolant, and often hear it boiling.

If it overheats again, make note of when it happens: driving on the highway, or stop-and-go around town. Overheating on the highway usually indicates a clogged radiator, while in-town overheating usually indicates a bad cooling fan (you don't need the fan above about 30 MPH). A bad fan is usually the fan relay, but it can be the fan thermostat (different from the engine thermostat), or a bad fan motor.

Oct 10, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

The car is overheating i do not know where the thermostat is


I assume you have checked the cooling system to ensure that first that it is full of coolant and second that there are no leaks and the radiator cap is in good condition. The heater hoses and those pesky little bypass hoses in the cooling system tend to go hard and split if they are over 10 years old, allowing coolant loss. If there are no leaks or air locks, the over heating could also be caused by a clogged radiator (more than 15% restriction in the radiator flow capacity will cause overheating problems), a faulty water pump or as you suspect, a faulty thermostat.
If there are no leaks but undetected loss of coolant, then it could indicate a problem with the head gasket (Usually caused by allowing engine to become excessively overheated when cooling system has run dry) allowing high pressure combustion gases into the engine water jacket, which super heats the coolant which then boils off, and is released via the cap.
If unsure take vehicle to cooling system specialist and have them do a pressure test and more thorough diagnosis.

Aug 28, 2010 | 2000 BMW 3 Series

1 Answer

White smoke coming out of exhaust, engine not overheating loss of power does not appear to be losing water


White smoke from the exhaust is a sign of coolant entering the combustion chamber. You say no coolant loss, or overheating. Is there a white foamy substance under the oil cap, & air bubbles escaping from the radiator? If so you have a leak and more than likely it is a blown head gasket. I would have a cooling system pressure test run. Do not continue to drive this Ford in this condition. Something is not right and you need to find out what is going on.

Apr 09, 2010 | 2000 Ford Focus

2 Answers

Over heating


When your temperature gauge reaches "H' it may too late to prevent a major breakdown. Knowing the symptoms of an overheated car and how they occur may be the difference between being inconvenienced and incapacitated.
Identification:---Other than a low oil level or low oil pressure light, there is not a more significant part of a car's instrumentation than a rising temperature gauge or a glowing "Hot" light. These lights are really the only confirmation a driver has that his car is really overheating. It is the identification of the symptoms of an overheating car that enable the motorist to avert a badly damaged engine. Overheating is always a traumatic event for a car's engine, which makes the early identification of the symptom an important addition to the informed motorist's tool kit.
Stuck Thermostat:--The car's thermostat is a valve that controls coolant flow from the engine block to the radiator. When the engine is cold the thermostat remains closed so that the coolant can reach operating temperature quicker and also provide heat to the passenger's compartment. The thermostat has a spring on it that moves depending on coolant temperature causing the thermostat to open. Sometimes the thermostat fails to open thus restricting coolant flow to the radiator where it would be cooled down. This condition is often the cause of overheating. The symptoms of this cause would be a rising temperature gauge and possibly the loss of heat inside the car.
Restricted Radiator:---A car's radiator will have thousands of gallons of coolant passing through in its lifetime. Along with the coolant comes particulate matter in the form of corrosion breaking loose from various parts of the car's cooling system. These contaminates collect in the tubes of the radiator reducing its efficiency. Extensive "plugging" in the radiator will cause the car to overheat. The symptom of this condition would be a rising temperature gauge which goes up when you accelerate.
Coolant Loss:--A car's cooling system is a closed loop system. You are not supposed to lose coolant. Sufficient coolant loss will cause the engine to run hot because engine is heating less coolant to higher temperatures. The symptom of overheating induced by coolant loss would be a pool of coolant on the pavement when the leak is external. Steam under the hood as the lost coolant hits hot parts of the engine, or a rising temperature gauge in the case of a undetectable engine related leak. Of course, the gauge would also go up if the leaks were not detected. Deteriorated Water Pump:--Cars use a belt driven pump to push the water and coolant mixture through the cooling system. This part is called the water pump. Rarely the impeller that draws the coolant through the pump will rust away making it impossible to push any through the system. If this occurs the temperature gauge will climb and coolant will boil over in the radiator. Inoperable Fan:----Most cooling fans are electrically driven. Some are driven by fan belts. If a belt breaks or the electric supply to the fan is interrupted overheating may result. Electric fans are tuned on thermostatically when needed. When the car runs at idle for extended periods or the weather is extremely hot, a failed fan will cause overheating otherwise it serves as a standby assist to the rest of the cooling system. In stress conditions an inoperable fan will cause the temperature gauge to rise. This will help. Thanks please keep updated.please please do rate the solution positively .thank you for using fixya

Mar 19, 2010 | 2001 Hyundai Accent

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