Question about 1998 Dodge Dakota

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I would like to know which way you turn the hex nut on the front wheels. Are they reversable threads or regular?

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Ther are reversable threads.

Posted on Jul 11, 2009

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Hi,this is devon I have a 2010 30 inch Liebherr fridge. Was bought used, How do i lower the front wheels.


Hey Devo,
The wheels MIGHT have a threaded stud that screws up and down..(it may have a lock nut on the threads),, just loosen the nut and screw the studs inward...If they do not have a threaded stud on the front wheels,,, you might have to raise the rear wheels.. - which in turn.. lowers the front..
Steve

Sep 20, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1993 Chevrolet Cheyenne K1500 4x4 truck- What's the average lug nut sized use on 16 wheels.


1993 Chevrolet Cheyenne K1500 4x4 truck Ralph, wheel nut size for your truck
Hex Size (mm): 22mm
  • Thread Size: M14-1.50
  • Hex Size (In): 13/16 Inch
  • Thread Size: M14-1.50
  • Hex Size (In): 7/8 Inch
  • Thread Size: M14-1.50
List Wheel Lug Nut 1993 Chevrolet K1500 Pickup 4WD Reilly Auto Parts

Mar 24, 2016 | Chevrolet Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Aisle nuts selftighting r not


If you mean axle nuts-the big nut on the axle at center of wheel-no, they are not self-tightening, just turned down real tight-about 150 ft.lbs. They are regular threaded, so to undo, turn them counter-clockwise.

Jul 12, 2012 | 1996 Dodge Intrepid

1 Answer

Im pretty sure the handbrake cable on my 2004 Jetta has broken, is this an easy fix or should i consult a mechanic?


here is the procedure from autozone.com. there are no special tools, but you need to be handy. Judge for yourself.


Removal & Installation

  1. Raise and safely support the rear wheels.
  2. On Front Wheel Drive models, remove the heat shield above the exhaust in the center tunnel.
  3. Locate the threaded adjusters. On All Wheel Drive (AWD) models, they are located in the front of the lower control arms, on Front Wheel Drive (FWD) vehicles, they are located in the tunnel on the underbody of the vehicle.
  4. Remove the locking clip between the hex nut and the adjustment housing.
  5. Counter hold the hex nut with a 13mm wrench and thread the adjustment housing to loosen the cable until the adjustment housing is fully loosened, then slide the 2 portions of the cable toward one another.
  6. Remove the lock clip at the brake caliper and remove the cable, taking care to not damage the cable boot.
  7. On Front Wheel Drive models, remove the heat shield above the muffler and push aside.
  8. Remove the cables from the cable brackets. Should the assembly aid fall out it is not necessary to reinstall it.
  9. Using a suitable flat blade screwdriver, remove the cables from the retaining bracket at the under body tunnel where the cables enter the interior of the vehicle.
  10. Remove the rear portion of the center console, then using a suitable flat blade screwdriver, push the cables toward the parking brake lever and press the cable ball end out of the bracket.
  11. From under the vehicle, press the guide sleeve-locking element together and pull the cables out of the guide sleeve.
To install:
  1. Guide the parking brake cables through until the guide sleeve locks into place.
  2. If not previously removed, remove any plastic parts at the hand brake lever adjustment bracket as they are not needed for installation.
  3. Using a No. 2 flat-blade screwdriver, lock the adjustment bracket at the hand brake lever to prevent it from turning.
  4. Insert the cable end ball through the mounting in the adjustment bracket, making sure the cable locks into place in the bracket.
  5. Working under the vehicle, route the cables through their routing brackets and attach them to the brake caliper.
  6. The balance of installation is in reverse order of removal noting the following:
  7. Adjust the parking brake cable and check its operation.
Disc Brakes
  1. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  2. Release the parking brake. It may be necessary to unscrew the adjusting nuts to provide slack in the brake cable.
  3. At each rear wheel brake caliper, remove the spring clip retaining the parking brake cable to the caliper.
  4. Lift the cable from the caliper mount and disengage it from the parking brake lever.
  5. Pull the cables out from under the vehicle.
  6. Installation is the reverse of removal.
  7. Adjust the parking brake as described at the beginning of this section.
Drum Brakes
  1. Block the front wheels and release the hand brake.
  2. Raise and safely support the rear of the vehicle.
  3. Remove the rear brake shoes.
  4. Remove the brake cable assembly from the back plates.
  5. Remove the cable adjusting nuts at the handle and detach the cable guides from the floor pan.
  6. Pull the cables out from under the vehicle.
  7. Installation is the reverse of removal. Adjust the parking brake and road test the vehicle.

Oct 26, 2010 | Volkswagen Jetta Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

STeering wheel is loose and noisy while steering. Sounds like something broke inside.


This might help to understand the steering linkage: REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Fig. 1: Steering linkage used on the Bronco and 4-wheel drive F-150 84928067.gif
Fig. 2: Steering linkage used on the 4-wheel drive F-350 84928070.gif
Fig. 3: Steering linkage used on F-Super Duty chassis/cab 84928071.gif
Pitman Arm EXCEPT F-SUPER DUTY STRIPPED CHASSIS AND MOTOR HOME CHASSIS
  1. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  2. Disconnect the drag link at the Pitman arm. You'll need a puller such as a tie rod end remover.
  3. Remove the Pitman arm-to-gear nut and washer.
  4. Matchmark the Pitman arm and gear housing for installation purposes.
  5. Using a 2-jawed puller, remove the Pitman arm from the gear.
  6. Installation is the reverse of removal. Align the matchmarks when installing the Pitman arm. Tighten the Pitman arm nut to 170-230 ft. lbs. (230-312 Nm); torque the drag link ball stud nut to 50-75 ft. lbs. (68-102 Nm), advancing the nut to align the cotter pin hole. Never back off the nut to align the hole.
F-SUPER DUTY STRIPPED CHASSIS MOTOR HOME CHASSIS
  1. Matchmark the Pitman arm and sector shaft.
  2. Disconnect the drag link from the Pitman arm.
  3. Remove the bolt and nut securing the Pitman arm to the sector shaft.
  4. Using a 2-jawed gear puller, remove the Pitman arm from the sector shaft. To install:
  5. Aligning the matchmarks, slide the Pitman arm onto the sector shaft. If the arm won't slide on easily, use a cold chisel to spread the separation. NEVER HAMMER THE ARM ONTO THE SHAFT! Hammering on the arm will damage the steering gear!
  6. Install the nut and bolt. Tighten the nut to 220-300 ft. lbs. (298-407 Nm).
  7. Connect the drag link.
Tie Rod and Drag Link EXCEPT RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  2. Remove the cotter pins and rust from the drag link and tie rod ball studs.
  3. Remove the drag link ball studs from the right-hand spindle and Pitman arm.
  4. Remove the tie rod ball studs from the left-hand spindle and drag link.
  5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Seat the studs in the tapered hole before tightening the nuts. This will avoid wrap-up of the rubber grommets during tightening of the nuts. Tighten the nuts to 70 ft. lbs. (95 Nm). Always use new cotter pins.
  6. Have the front end alignment checked.
RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in the straight-ahead position.
  3. Remove the nuts connecting the drag link ball studs to the connecting rod and Pitman arm.
  4. Disconnect the drag link using a tie rod end remover.
  5. Loosen the bolts on the adjuster clamp. Count the number of turns it take to remove the drag link from the adjuster. To install:
  6. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Install the drag link with the same number of turns it took to remove it. Make certain that the wheels remain in the straight-ahead position during installation. Seat the studs in the tapered hole before tightening the nuts. This will avoid wrap-up of the rubber grommets during tightening of the nuts. Tighten the adjuster clamp nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm). Tighten the ball stud nuts to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm).
  7. Have the front end alignment checked.
Connecting Rod RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in the straight-ahead position.
  3. Disconnect the connecting rod from the drag link by removing the nut and separating the two with a tie rod end remover.
  4. Loosen the bolts on the adjusting sleeve clamps. Count the number of turns it takes to remove the connecting rod from the connecting rod from the adjuster sleeve and remove the rod.
  5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Install the connecting rod the exact number of turns noted during removal. Tighten the tie rod nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm); the ball stud nut to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm).
  6. Have the front end alignment checked.
Tie Rod Ends RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE Fig. 4: Remove the cotter pin from the castellated nut at the ball stud 88288p02.jpg
Fig. 5: Remove the nut from the ball stud 88288p03.jpg
Fig. 6: Use a tie rod end puller tool to remove the ball stud from the Pitman arm 88288p04.jpg
Fig. 7: Liquid correction fluid makes excellent paint to mark the threads of the tie rod end 88288p05.jpg
Fig. 8: For a more accurate reinstallation, you may measure the tie rod end prior to removal 88288p06.jpg
Fig. 9: After having loosened the nut, unscrew and remove the tie rod end 88288p07.jpg
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  3. Remove the ball stud from the Pitman arm using a tie rod end remover. NOTE: Optional: paint a mark or measure the length of the tie rod end threads to ease reinstallation in as close to the original position as possible.
  4. Loosen the nuts on the adjusting sleeve clamp. Remove the ball stud from the adjuster, or the adjuster from the tie rod. Count the number of turns it takes to remove the sleeve from the tie rod or ball stud from the sleeve. To install:
  5. Install the sleeve on the tie rod, or the ball in the sleeve the same number of turns noted during removal. Make sure that the adjuster clamps are in the correct position, illustrated, and torque the clamp bolts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm).
  6. Keep the wheels facing straight-ahead and install the ball studs. Tighten the nuts to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm). Use new cotter pins.
  7. Install the drag link and connecting rod.
  8. Have the front end alignment checked.
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Sep 18, 2010 | 1996 Ford F150 Regular Cab

2 Answers

Change the front wheel bearings on a 2005 taurus


Remove wheel
Remove axle nut
Remove outer tie rod nut
Leave outer tie rod nut on 3-4 threads
Hit spindle area where tie rod is mounted very hard with a large hammer (wear Saftey glasses)
The tie rod should loosen up and you remove it off spindle.
Remove lower ball joint nut
Leave nut on 3-4 threads
Hit spindle area where ball joint mounts (wear saftey glasses)
Carfully pry down the lower control arm too remove ball joint from arm.
Press in the axle towards the trans. out of the wheel bearing.
Place a piece of wood between the shock and inner fender to give yourself room to work.
Remove the three 15mm bolts that hold the wheel bearing on.
Hit wheel bearing out with hammer (wearing saftey glasses)
You may need to break a sweat on this part. Somtimes they are rusted in.
Be carfull not to damage the ABS sensor.

Reverse procedures to install

Sep 08, 2009 | 2005 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

How do you remove front brake rotor on k 3500 4x4 1993


pull tire, remove outer hub (automatic or locking?) usually eight hex screws, behind hub assembly is a "wheel bearing nut" about 2" in diameter, this is just a circle with threads on the inside of it and four notches around the outside of it, the only way to get this out is to get the right "wheel bearing nut socket" from an automotive store, just FYI, it is probably going to be a special order tool. after "wheel bearing nut" is off the rotor will come off along with the wheel bearings, while you are in there these should probably be replaced also

Aug 14, 2009 | 1989 GMC K3500

1 Answer

Front brake rotors.


1. Loosen the wheel nuts slightly. 2. Raise the front of the car and support it with safety stands in the proper locations. 3. Remove the wheel nuts and front wheel. 4. Remove the brake hose mounting bolts. 5. Remove the caliper bracket mounting bolts, and hang the caliper to one side. CAUTION: To prevent accidental damage to the caliper or brake hose, use a short piece of wire to hang the caliper from the undercarriage. 6. On ABS equipped vehicles, remove the wheel sensor wire bracket, then remove the wheel sensor from the knuckle but do not disconnect the wheel sensor connector. NOTE: Use ball joint removers to separate the ball joints from the suspension or tie-rod end. 7. Clean any dirt or grease off the ball joint. Remove the cotter pin from the tie-rod end ball joint castle nut and remove the nut. 8. Apply grease to the special tool on the areas shown. This will ease installation of the tool and prevent damage to the pressure bolt threads. 9. Install a 10mm hex nut on the ball joint. Be sure that the hex nut is flush with the ball joint pin end to prevent damage to the threaded end of the ball joint. 10. Adjust the jaw spacing by turning the pressure bolt. NOTE: If necessary, apply penetrating type lubricant to loosen the ball joint. 11. Once the tool is in place, turn the adjusting bolt as necessary to make the jaws parallel. Then hand tighten the pressure bolt, and recheck the jaws to make sure they are still parallel as pictured above. 12. With a wrench, tighten the pressure bolt until the ball joint shaft pops loose from the steering arm. WARNING: WEAR EYE PROTECTION. THE BALL JOINT CAN BREAK LOOSE SUDDENLY AND SCATTER DIRT OR OTHER DEBRIS IN YOUR EYES. 13. Remove the tool, then remove the nut from the end of the ball joint and pull the ball joint out of the steering/suspension arm. Inspect the ball joint boot and replace if damaged. 14. Remove the cotter pin from the lower arm ball joint castle nut, and remove the nut. 15. Install a 12mm hex nut on the ball joint. Be sure that the hex nut is flush with the ball joint pin end, or the threaded section of the ball joint pin might be damaged by the ball joint remover. 16. Use the ball joint remover, 32mm, as shown to separate the lower ball joint and lower arm. NOTE: If necessary, apply penetrating type lubricant to loosen the ball joint. 17. Remove the knuckle protector. 18. Remove the cotter pin from the upper ball joint castle nut, and remove the nut. 19. Install a 10mm hex nut on the ball joint. Be sure that the hex nut is flush with the ball joint pin end, or the threaded section of the ball joint pin might be damaged by the ball joint remover. 20. Use the ball joint remover as shown to separate the upper ball joint and knuckle. NOTE: If necessary, apply penetrating type lubricant to loosen the ball joint. 21. Pull the knuckle outward and remove the driveshaft outboard joint from the knuckle by tapping the driveshaft end using a plastic hammer, then remove the knuckle. 22. Remove the knuckle from the hub unit. 23. Remove the four flange bolts, then separate the hub unit from the brake disc.

Jun 08, 2009 | 1994 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Crossmember mount nuts


This is what I found it seems pretty good but I am having a hard time removing the broken piece from the rear holder.
Tools and Materials Required

Floor jack, 2-1/2 ton minimum, 4-ton preferred
2 or 4 jack stands, 2-ton minimum
Breaker bar, 1/2" drive
Ratchet, 3/8" and 1/2" drive
4" or 6" extension, 3/8" and 1/2" drive
1/2", 9/16", 5/8", 11/16", 3/4" open end and box end wrenches/sockets
Scraper, pocket knife, etc. to clean torsion bar socket in A-arm
Bottle jack, wood blocks, etc.
2-lb. sledgehammer
3/8" or 1/2" diameter drift or hard steel punch or similar tool
Large flat blade screwdriver or small pry bar to remove torsion bar socket end seal
Torsion bar tensioning tool
Penetrating oil, as required
Chassis grease, as required
High pressure thread lubricant, as required
Mineral spirits, solvent, etc. as required or desired
Gloves and eye protection
Procedure: NOTE: Always wear eye protection, especially when working under the coach. Be aware that when you loosen/remove any of the hardware or components, a lot of drek will fall out. Protect your eyes. And never, never, NEVER get under the coach unless it is supported securely with appropriate jack stands. Do not get under it while it is only lifted on a jack.

Raise and support vehicle enough to allow loosening of wheel lug nuts, loosen nuts.
With floor jack, raise vehicle at front crossmember until wheels are off the ground.
Support vehicle with jack stands under the front crossmember, and additionally under the frame as the situation warrants.
Remove wheel on whichever side is being worked on.
Apply generous amount of penetrating oil to the torsion bar adjusting bolts and nuts. Let set to thoroughly penetrate rusted bolts. Take a measurement of or carefully observe how far the adjusting bolts are threaded into the nuts. You will need these measurements to approximately reset the bolts for ride height adjustment later.
Apply penetrating oil to mid-frame crossmember attaching bolts. Let set.
Follow the torsion bar to the front, and locate the mounting socket in the lower A-arm. At the front of the hex shaped socket is a soft metal seal cap. You have to remove this cap to be able to slide the torsion bar forward enough to remove it from the rear mount. With the large flat blade screwdriver or small pry bar, pry out this cap. Try not to damage it too much. One or more of the side flanges of the cap may break off and it could get bent up while removing it. It doesn't seem to be too critical, and can be pounded back into shape sufficiently to be reused.
Apply a small amount of high pressure thread lubricant to the threads and end point of the torsion bar tensioning tool. Attach torsion bar tensioning tool squarely on the frame member. Be sure the locating pin is in the guide hole on the top side of the crossmember right over the "pork chop". If your tool does not have this locating pin, be sure to attach the tool squarely on the top of the crossmember.
Tighten any bolts/nuts on the tool to secure it. Turn the center bolt of the tool up into the dimple in the bottom of the pork chop arm. Continue tightening until the end of the pork chop arm is off the adjusting bolt.
Carefully remove the adjusting bolt. This could take some time and a lot of effort. Keep the penetrating oil handy as several applications may be necessary. If it strips or breaks, you'll have to cut it out or burn it out with a torch, and replace it with a new one.
When the adjusting bolt is out, remove the flat nut (rounded with slots on one side).
Turn the torsion bar tensioning tool center bolt counterclockwise to relieve the tension on the pork chop and bar. When the tension is completely off the bar, the tool and bar/pork chop assembly will basically fall apart.
Remove the tool.
Repeat 7 through 13 for the other side, except you don't have to remove the seal cap if you are not removing/replacing the torsion bar. You only have to loosen the bar to be able to move the crossmember.
On the rear side of the crossmember you can see the end of the torsion bar through a small hole in the crossmember. Insert the drift/punch into this hole and with the hammer pound the bar loose until it starts to slide forward. At this point you should probably be able to slide the bar forward enough by hand to clear the crossmember.
Loosen and remove the crossmember mount assembly on the side you're working on. Two bolts and nuts hold it in place. Slide the rubber mount away from the crossmember and remove it.
Loosen the bolts on the other side enough so that the crossmember can be moved. If you are removing/replacing both torsion bars, go ahead and remove the bolts and crossmember mount.
Using the bottle jack and necessary wood blocks, raise the crossmember enough so that the torsion bar can be slid under it. You will have to make sure the bar goes back into the hex socket on the front mount so it will slide through. The old grease in the socket will act like glue, so you may want to loosen it up with penetrating oil or mineral spirits or some other solvent. Slide the bar through and out of the socket. It weighs 25 or 30 pounds so don't let it fall on your head. Remove the bar and yourself from under the coach.
With a pocket knife or other small scraping tool, clean out the old grease from the front hex socket. Use a solvent to remove all the grease, if desired. Clean the old grease from the hex end of the torsion bar.
Reshape the socket seal cap if necessary. Test fit it into the socket, but don't pound it into place yet.
Examine the threads of the adjusting bolt and nut. If they look okay, clean them up with a wire brush. Dress them with a die and tap if you have these tools. Otherwise, the wire brush should be fine. Reassemble them with high pressure thread lube and run the bolt all the way through and back again. Clean the threads again, and re-lube them with thread lube. Leave them disassembled.
Apply a glob of clean chassis grease to the inside of the front hex socket. Be liberal and coat it well. Apply grease over the hex end of the torsion bar.
From under the coach, insert the torsion bar (either replacement or same one) into the front hex socket. Be sure you have the correct bar for the side. Each bar is marked on the end with either "L" or "R". Each one will fit on either side, but you don't want to mix them up. Verify before you assemble.
Installation is just the reverse of removal. Reassemble the bar/pork chop. Tap the bar from the front enough to set it 1/8" or so from the inner surface of the crossmember. Check it at the hole in the crossmember.
Be sure to tap the seal cap back into place.
Reinstall the crossmember mount, and tighten bolts. Be sure to tighten bolts on the side loosened.
Apply the torsion bar tool and raise the end of the pork chop far enough to be beyond where it was originally. Insert the adjusting nut and bolt. Turn the adjusting bolt up to about the same position you observed or measured prior to disassembly. Remove tensioning tool allowing the pork chop to contact adjusting bolt.
Remove jack stands, and reinstall front wheel(s).
Completely lower coach.
Check and adjust ride height as outlined in the Owner's Manual or service manual. Be sure tire pressures are correct and rear suspension is at the correct height ("Travel" position). Use the tensioning tool with the front wheels off the ground to raise or lower the pork chop. Never use the adjusting bolt -- it will strip. No matter which way you have to adjust the ride height, always relieve the tension on the adjusting bolt before trying to turn it.

Jun 23, 2008 | 2004 Ford F250

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