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Heater permanently on hot - temperature control has no effect

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Yhe temperture control valve is jammed and will need replaced

Posted on Jul 11, 2009

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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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2003 grand marquis no heat engine temp normal other eatc ops all normal. is there an external heater control valve on the car?


  • Insufficient, erratic, or no heat
  • Low engine coolant level.
  • Engine overheating.
  • Plugged or partially plugged heater core (18476).
  • Temperature blend door binding/stuck.
  • Temperature blend door actuator (19E616).
  • Incorrect heater control valve (18495) operation.
  • Go To Pinpoint Test I .

Are the heater hose's going through the fire wall hot ?
I2 CHECK FOR HOT WATER TO THE HEATER CORE INLET HOSE WARNING: The heater core inlet hose will become too hot to handle and may cause serious burns if the system is working correctly. Allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature. Feel the heater core inlet hose.
  • Is the heater core inlet hose too hot to handle?
Yes GO to I4 .

No REFER to Section 303-03 to check cooling system function.

Jan 06, 2018 | 2003 Mercury Grand Marquis

3 Answers

1999 ford expedition , runs good doesn't overheat , but puts out no heat ?


heater core might need replaced . check the hoses going to it under the hood after it gets to operating temperature .One should be hot and the other not so much

Nov 19, 2015 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Hot air only, no fresh air or ac air. no engine overheating.


Your hot air keeps coming since the louver get stuck due to mechanism failure inside the ducting console. It usually is controlled by temperature setting. When the setting has no effect then the engagement is loose. Nee to open the dash vent to check out.

Jun 25, 2010 | 2002 Toyota Tacoma

1 Answer

No heat on 96 Accord can move hot water control valve with no effect.


I would check the evaporator core temperature sensor output levels and compare them to a haynes manual's recommended values. If this is fine, maybe the heater control circuit has gone out, or a heater fuse.

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/jeremy_69f3cc28d95bf514

Jan 09, 2010 | 1996 Honda Accord

3 Answers

My 2001 toyota tundra heater wont blow hot air. I checked to see if the heater core is cloged it seems fine the heater control valve is operating properly, and I changed the thermastat. and yet the heater...


If you've changed the coolant recently, it could be air locked in the heater core. To remove park the truck with the front higher than the back and remove the radiator cap. Start the engine and let it run while watching for a big air bubble burp coming out the radiator neck. Top off the coolant and continue.

Nov 12, 2009 | 2001 Toyota Tundra

1 Answer

Morning, I have a 2006 dodge stratus sedan. When I turn the heat on only cold air blows when the car is sitting at a red light. But when I drive hot air blows. Is my heating element going out?


Water-cooled engines supply heat for the passenger compartment by circulating hot coolant through a radiator-like heater core. The passenger compartment fan forces air through this heater core and into the passenger area. The flow of coolant for this purpose can be controlled with a valve in the line that is adjusted when the heat control is moved or via a flap that blocks or opens the air path through the heater core to adjust temperature.
The effect you describe can be caused by several different sources:
- A slipping belt which turns the water pump. - A partially collapsed hose in the circuit for the heater, causing a reduction of water flow to the heater core. - A heater core internally blocked from deposits from the water component of the coolant. - A valve which is not being adjusted through its normal range by the dashboard control. - A flap suffering the same limitation as above.
Another effect our personal vehicles generally show with age is caused by abnormally low engine friction attributable to a particular additive we use that reduces engine friction so much that the thermostat that controls coolant/engine temperature is wide open but the engine doesn't heat enough to bring the coolant temperature into the normal operating range. We notice on two of three vehicles, that rolling on a long downgrade (engine not loaded) will cause the engine temperature to drop below its customary operating temperature.
If you have a dashboard temperature gauge, watch it to see if it rises into the middle of the range or not. If not, there may not be much you can do other than flush the cooling system, making sure that the heater control is set to its highest temperature to ensure that the heater core is in the loop while flushing.

Oct 16, 2009 | 2000 Dodge Stratus

4 Answers

W202 mercedes c220. Flashing heater panel lights and only hot air


hi. have the exact same problem on my 1995 c220 (UKmodel). Did you manage to sort it? If so - what was it???

Sep 17, 2009 | 1995 Mercedes-Benz C-Class

1 Answer

95 Wrangler Heater not working


Engine vacuum wouldn't effect heater temperature, and a fuse wouldn't either. Locate the hoses going into your bulkhead that go to your heater core. Carefully touch the lines to see any major temperature difference in the hoses. If one line is hot and the other line cold, You have a bad heater core. The lines should be pretty close in temperature and should both be hot. Be careful!

Apr 25, 2009 | 1994 Jeep Wrangler

1 Answer

I have the same problem with my windstar blower is fine but is coming cold air but no heat i dont know what to do can any one show me how to fix it thnx


First, feel the heater hoses going into the firewall under the hood. If they are hot, then you have hot engine coolant going into the heater core. If they are not hot, then you either have a bad thermostat or you are very low on engine coolant.

Next you need air flowing through the heater core so it can come out heated through your vents. If the iar is flowing somewhere else, your temp blend door is not moving because the bend door motor is bad or your temp knob on your heater controls is bad. The blend door motor is an electric motor.

------------------------------------------------
Air Flow Control
Air flow control is accomplished in the following manner:
  • Primary control is through the function selector knob , mounted on the heater function selector switch, which is part of the heater control .
  • The function selector knob has the following positions: OFF, PANEL, PANEL/FLOOR, FLOOR, FLOOR/DEFROST and DEFROST.
  • The heater function selector switch combines a vacuum selector valve with an internal electrical switch.
  • The vacuum selector valve directs source vacuum to various vacuum control motors (18A318) . Refer to the System Airflow Schematic and Vacuum Control Charts.
  • An internal single-pole electrical switch is also controlled by the selector. The switch controls the electrical supply to the heater blower motor switch (18578) .
  • The position of the function selector knob determines the manner in which the system will operate.
  • Each position of the function selector knob is detented for positive engagement.
Temperature Control
The temperature control operates in the following manner:
  • Temperature control of the heater system is determined by the position of the temperature control knob (between COOL-BLUE and WARM-RED) of the heater control .
  • This control knob is connected to a potentiometer mounted in the heater control . This potentiometer is electrically connected to the electric blend door actuator that operates the A/C air temperature control door.


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  • Movement of the control knob from COOL (Blue) to WARM (Red) causes a corresponding movement on the air temperature control door and determines the temperature that the system will maintain.
System uses a reheat method to provide conditioned air to the passenger compartment.
  • All airflow from the blower motor (18527) passes through the A/C evaporator housing .
  • Temperature is then regulated by reheating a portion of the air and blending it with the remaining cool air to the desired temperature.
  • Temperature blending is varied by the air temperature control door, which regulates the amount of air that flows through and/or around the heater core (18476) , where it is then mixed and distributed.
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inside you plenum box:

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Mar 03, 2009 | 1998 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

No hot air .


the blend door motor could be bad or the door itself could be broken inside the heater box. big job to fix that, the entire dash has to come out.

Oct 16, 2008 | 1998 Ford F150 Regular Cab

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