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Not enough voltage to ignite igniter - Cars & Trucks

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Sometimes the igniter wires get loose in the distributor.

Posted on May 01, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

It wont start with ignition but can clutch start and run fine what wrong with ignition


nothing wrong with the ignition but there is with the battery
when trying to start from the key , the battery falls below that required to start and run the ignition system but with a push start there is enough voltage to run the ignition system and then the alternator cuts in to supply power to all the rest
have a load test done on the battery

Mar 01, 2016 | 2000 Nissan Frontier

1 Answer

Ignition key lights up but does not turn over


It's common for the battery to have enough voltage to make just about everything electrical on the car work, but not have enough power to crank the engine. I would check your battery first. When you try to start it, does the voltage drop below 12 volts? If so, you need a fresh battery. If you don't have access to a voltage meeter and your battery is more than 5 years old you can assume that you need to replace it.

Apr 21, 2013 | Volkswagen Polo Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Codes are reading low tps voltage, mapps high voltage ignition on low voltage at idle. Idle surges sputers and stalls when driving. Replaceed mapp and tps with no improvment?


Have you consider to check the battery power. I believe the main problem you have is either the battery or the alternator. Due to these two things with low voltage the brain ( ECU ) does not have the enough power to work. Good Luck.

Aug 15, 2012 | 1992 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

1 Answer

Battery good; All panel instruments appear to be operational; no fault displayed yet get no ignition. Same thing happened yesterday. after driving back from work, stopped at store. Was inside for abt 45...


Sorry I got to your question too late. Sometimes a weak solenoid doesn't get enough voltage. Some over come this with a relay bypass, a direct line from the battery to a relay controlled by the ignition to the solenoid. I'm glad you found the problem.

Oct 04, 2011 | 2001 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

Turns over but, won't start


Possible you must have the car checked for the basic fuel/ignition system.
You will need to check on the fuel, the fuel filter, the fuel pump. Check the calibration of the pump .
Also check the spark intensity , check the plugs the HT coils and the trigger voltages.
The ignition timing also must be checked to confirm that the firing is correct.
Finally the engine must crank well so that there is enough voltage to the ignition system.
Hope there are no errors codes that come up when the ignition is turned.

Jun 20, 2011 | 2003 Saturn ION

1 Answer

Motor start but does not run


Are you saying that the motor runs until you stop cranking it? or just that it truns over while the starter is engaged but doesn't fire at all?
If it's running while cranking but stalls immediately after you release the key and allow it to go into the "Run" position, then the ballast resistor of the ignition system is most likely bad. The idea is that on older cars with electronic ignition, the starter motor caused such a big voltage drop on the cars electrical system that the ignition coil wasn't provided a high enough voltage for proper spark to occur, so they wired them such that the ignition coil could handle the low voltage which was present during the cranking of the starter, but when you stopped cranking and the engine was running normally, suddenly without the voltage drop of the starter, the voltage would be to high and would damage the ignition circuit. Thus a 'ballast resistor' was added to the ignition circuit and it is only in line when the car is in the "run" position. This allows the ignition system the proper voltage to operate whether cranking or running, but sometimes the ballast resistors go bad, causing the engine to run while cranking but causing an open circuit in the ignition system when placed in the "run" position.
Good Luck.

Mar 28, 2011 | 1993 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

Wont start and getting no spark


If the charging system is not putting out the required voltage, is it the alternator or the regulator? Full fielding the alternator to bypass the regulator should tell you if it is working correctly. Or, take the alternator to a parts store and have it bench tested. If the charging voltage goes up when the regulator is bypassed, the problem is the regulator (or the engine computer in the case of computer-regulated systems). If there is no change in output voltage, the alternator is the culprit.

When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and compression. Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or crankshaft position (CKP) sensor.

A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.

Tell us news.

Sep 06, 2010 | 1996 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

I have a ford f150 4 wheel drive I have spark to the coil but noting coming out,


its a bad coil. coils boost the voltage of the spark to make it strong enough to ignite the fuel mixture. you will have no combustion per every cylinder with a bad coil. im pretty sure its electronic ignition on 2004+ 5.4l motors, so its not anything mechanical. if it was the ECM, you'd have no pre-coil voltage either.

May 02, 2010 | 1985 Ford F150

2 Answers

How to determine if a condenser is still functional.


The ignition condenser is needed for good coil saturation and is directly related to the voltage output of the coil, the weaker the ignition condenser is, the weaker the spark will be from the coil.

The signs to look for when replacing the ignition points are burnt or pitted contact surfaces at the breakers, and for a worn down rubbing block. (where the points contact the cam lobes inside the distributor)

The only things that you can do to prolong the life of the ignition points is to make sure that the rubbing block on the ignition points and the distributor cam lobes are properly lubricated with die-electric grease, and make sure that the dwell angle is properly set. (you would need a dwell meter to set the ignition points properly)

The only reason that the engine would stall from the ignition points is because either the condenser burned out, or the rubbing block wore down and the ignition points closed up. (The ignition points should open and close to provide a primary signal to the coil, if they do close up, you can get home by using a piece of a match book cover to set the gap for the ignition points, it is approximate enough to work well enough to get you back home if stranded from closed up ignition points)

I hope that this was helpful to you in any way.

Apr 27, 2010 | Isuzu Pickup Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Why do you only have spark when ignition switch is turned from start to run on 1978 ford mustang?


I presume that you mean power out of the switch when the switch is in the run position and not the start position, correct?

The situation can be understood by knowing that an ignition coil needs to run in the 8 to 10 volt range. To acheive this, there is a ballast resistor that drops the voltage, durning normal running...This is the circuit that is fed with power from the switch in the RUN position...

During Start, system voltage drops, as you can imagine, with the load of the starter, during this exact time, the ballast resistor would not output enough voltage to fire the ignition, SO, there is a bypass circuit, actuated during starter engaugement, that feeds full battery power to the coil. this bypasses the ballast resistor, and provides enough voltage for the coil to work.

Doc

Sep 16, 2009 | 1982 Ford Mustang

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