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"reduced engine power" and occasionally the truck will stall while driving.

To restart truck, we wiggle connector to MAP sensor, truck will start and engine power is restored until the next episode. MAP sensor has been replaced. What else could it be?

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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Sounds as if it is related to a Chev. This is usually caused by a correlation problem between the accelerator pedal sensor and the throttle plate assembly. The most common repair is to replace the throttle plate/motor assembly unit

Posted on Apr 25, 2015

Testimonial: "We got a P2135 code. Ordered a whole throttle body unit and will replace this afternoon. Fingers crossed. Upon further inspection, we did notice a strange noise from the throttle plate so replacing the unit was probably our best option. Thank you!"

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Throttle position sensor 06 grandprix gt


O2 sensors can cause this and often they clear up after a good run.

Nov 20, 2013 | 2006 Pontiac Grand Prix

1 Answer

ENGINE POWER REDUCED FOR 2006 PONTIAC G5 PERSUIT


Had this problem after getting water into the air intake.

Searched the net, and here a a host of suggestions.

***********************

FROM THE NET
i know the 300 code is cylinder misfire... i had that issue, are you using the stock delcos?
P0171- this is a lean code. are you using 89-91 gas when you should only be using 87? that could do it.
P0106-The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) uses the Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP) to monitor engine load. (NOTE: Some vehicles have a Barometric Pressure (BARO) sensor that is integral to the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor and do not have a MAP sensor. Other vehicles have a MAF/BARO and a redundant MAP sensor where the MAP sensor functions as a backup input in case of MAF failure.) The PCM supplies a 5 Volt reference signal to the MAP sensor. Usually the PCM also supplies a ground circuit to the MAP sensor as well. As the manifold pressure changes with load, the MAP sensor input informs the PCM. At idle the voltage should be 1 to 1.5 Volts and approximately 4.5 Volts at Wide Open Throttle (WOT). The PCM looks for any change in manifold pressure to be preceded by a change in engine load in the form of changes in throttle angle, engine speed, or Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) flow. If the PCM doesn't see any of these factors change while detecting a rapid change in MAP value, it will set a P0106.
Potential Symptoms
The following could be symptomatic of a P0106:
* Engine runs rough
* Black smoke at tailpipe
* Engine will not idle
* Poor fuel economy
* Engine misses at speed
A P0106 could be caused by:
* Bad MAP sensor
* Water/dirt intrusion affecting MAP sensor connector
* Intermittent open in the reference, ground, or signal wire for the MAP sensor
* Intermittent short in the reference, ground, or signal wire for the MAP sensor
* Ground problem due to corrosion causing intermittent signal problem
* A break in the flexible air intake duct between the MAF and the intake manifold
* Bad PCM (do not assume the PCM is bad until you've exhausted all other possibilities)
Possible Solutions
Using a scan tool, watch the MAP sensor value with the key on, engine off. Compare the BARO reading with the MAP reading. They should be roughly equal. The voltage for the MAP sensor should read approx. 4.5 volts. Now start the engine and look for a significant drop in the MAP sensor voltage indicating the MAP sensor is working.
If the MAP reading doesn't change perform the following:
1. With the Key on, engine off, disconnect the vacuum hose from the MAP sensor. Using a vacuum pump, pull 20 in. of vacuum on the MAP sensor. Does the voltage drop? It should. If it doesn't inspect the MAP sensor vacuum port and vacuum hose to manifold for a restriction of some kind. Repair or replace as necessary.
2. If there are no restrictions, and the value doesn't change with vacuum, then perform the following: with the Key on and engine off and the MAP sensor unplugged, check for 5 Volts at the reference wire to the MAP sensor connector with a Digital Voltmeter. If there is none, check for reference voltage at the PCM connector. If the reference voltage is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, check for open or short in the reference wire between MAP and PCM and retest.
3. If reference voltage is present, then check for existing ground at the MAP sensor connector. If it isn't present then repair open/short in the ground circuit.
4. If ground is present, then replace MAP sensor.
1) I drive a 2006 Pontiac G5. Just recently, it started going in to Reduced engine power, meaning that I was and STILL am not able to accelerate.
Anyways, the mechanics at my local GM delarship told me "If the car wasn't in reduced engine power at the time, they couldn't tell what code it was and therfore were unable to idenitify what the actually problem was". So as a shot in the dark, it was reccommended that I replace the pedal accelerator, which I did. All but gtwo days late, reduced engine power yet again.
However, THIS TIME, when it went in to reduced engine power I was close to the dealership and actually took it in and left in running so that the mechanic could sit in it. Anyways, after a codes test, it was then determined that I needed to replace my ECM. This was done, and no less then a week later, reduced engine power AGAIN.
I took the car in, and the mechanic literally shrugged and said that GM mechanics have no idea how to fix this problem, and actually suggested that I trade in for a new car.....
From what I have been reading, this "reduced engine power" is a serious problem for GM - one that warrants a recall.
I hope I added some insight - and if anyone has any suggestions I would love to hear from you! Right now I stuck with a 4-year old lemon in my driveway
I still remember my first and only experience with reduced power it turned out to be a wire was not plugged all the way in on the transmission. If its a short in a wire causing it that's a hard problem to find give the shop some time to find it but if you are unhappy with the current shop do take it in to another one.
This is what I got from gm service information
Reduced Engine Power Mode
When the ECM detects a condition with the TAC system, the ECM may enter a reduced engine power mode. Reduced engine power may cause one or more of the following conditions:
• Acceleration limiting--The ECM will continue to use the accelerator pedal for throttle control, however, the vehicle acceleration is limited.
• Limited throttle mode--The ECM will continue to use the accelerator pedal for throttle control, however, the maximum throttle opening is limited.
• Throttle default mode--The ECM will turn OFF the throttle actuator motor and the throttle will return to the spring loaded default position.
• Forced idle mode--The ECM will perform the following actions:
- Limit engine speed to idle by positioning the throttle position, or by controlling the fuel and spark if the throttle is turned OFF
- Ignore the accelerator pedal input
• Engine shutdown mode--The ECM will disable fuel and de-energize the throttle actuator.
The tac system is the throttle actuator control
. . . THOUGHT we had it each time..
replace ECM, Body control modules, everything but the kitchen sink... then took the fuse box out to replace the whole boxx and a wire underneath it was pinched and shorting out....
solved all teh problems... moral of the story, loose wire, pinched wire, bad ground something somewhere is prolly shorting out..
Ok had to wait for the check Engine to come on again so I could check the codes. I got two codes (P1515 / P2101)!! P1516 refers to the TAC and says The ECM has detected an out of range condition between the predicted and actual throttle position. P2101 refers to the Throttle Position sensor, And says that the TP senor does not agree with the APP. It Further stated that the ECM has detected the TPS angle does not agree with the APP commanded angle.
Ok heres the deal, I took the Throttle body off, cleaned it (looks like new!!) real good and then I checked the Module on the side of it for moisture and the connection!!! Put every thing back together,and so far every thing is good ( no check engine light- no Reduced Engine Power mode,and the car is running fine!!!
Lampoon you are the man thanks again for that ON THE MONEY CALL!!!!

Jan 03, 2013 | 2006 Pontiac G5

1 Answer

Ran an ecu fault code reader on my focus and it shows up beromatric low presure what is this ?


Hi there,

If you are correct with your code reader, this condition should trigger fault code: P0107.

This relates to your MAP/BARO Sensor's signal voltage is too low (below 0.25v).

This condition will cause all sorts of engine running issues....

First, using your scan tool with the Key on and engine running, monitor the MAP Sensor voltage. If it is reading less than 5 volts, turn engine off, unplug the MAP sensor and, using a DVOM (Digital Volt/Ohm Meter) check for 5Volts on the 5 Volt reference circuit.


1. If there is not 5 Volts on the reference circuit, then check for the reference voltage at the PCM connector. If it is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, repair the open in the wiring loom between the PCM and MAP harness connector.


If 5 Volt reference is NOT present at the PCM connector, check powers and grounds of PCM and repair/replace as needed.


2. If you have a 5 Volt reference at the MAP connector, jumper the 5 volt reference circuit to the signal circuit. Now check the MAP voltage on the scan tool. It should be 4.5 to 5 Volts. If it is, replace MAP sensor. If not, repair open/short in the signal circuit wiring and re-check.


3. If all appears okay, perform a wiggle test. Start engine and manipulate the harness, connector and tap on the MAP sensor. Note any changes in voltage or engine speed. Repair connector, harness, or sensor as needed.


4. If the wiggle test checks out, use a vacuum pump (or just use your lungs) to draw a vacuum on the MAP sensor vacuum port. As you add vacuum the voltage should decrease. With no vacuum, the MAP sensor should read approximately 4.5 volts. If there is no change in MAP sensor reading on the scan tool, replace MAP sensor.



Cheers,

Sep 05, 2011 | 2001 Ford Focus

2 Answers

1995 chrysler new yorker starts fine and idles fine. When I put in gear and take off it bogs down and stalls. Could this be a fuel pressure regulator.


More likely the MAP sensor. A new sensor is $65, so I recommend you test it to see if it's bad. Test procedures are pasted below. Please let me know if it passes the tests or if you have any questions, and thanks for using FixYa.

OPERATIONThe PCM supplies 5 volts to the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor. The MAP sensor converts what it reads as the amount of intake manifold pressure into a return signal. The PCM monitors the MAP sensor output voltage. As vacuum increases in the intake manifold, the MAP sensor voltage decreases proportionately. Also, as vacuum decreases, the MAP sensor voltage increases proportionately.
During engine cranking, before the engine starts running, the PCM determines atmospheric air pressure from the MAP sensor voltage. While the engine operates, the PCM determines the intake manifold pressure from the MAP sensor voltage.
Based on MAP sensor voltage and inputs from other sensors, the PCM adjusts spark advance and the air/fuel mixture.
TESTING jturcotte_1911.gif



Fig. Fig. 1: Manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor wiring schematic-1993-95 models


jturcotte_1912.gif



Fig. Fig. 2: Manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor connector terminal pin locations-1993-95 models


Before testing any electrical component, inspect the wiring and connectors for damage. Also wiggle the connectors to ensure a that they are firmly engaged. When testing the sensor, use a high input impedance digital volt-ohmmeter. Insert the tester leads through the back of the connector. Do not disconnect the electrical harness.

  1. Inspect the vacuum hose connections at the sensor and throttle body. Repair or replace the hoses, if any hoses are cracking or vacuum is leaking.

For the following step, do not unplug the sensor connector-it must stay plugged in.
  1. Make sure that the sensor wiring connector is fully inserted into the sensor (loose connections can create trouble codes). Check the MAP sensor output voltage by inserting the negative lead of a voltmeter into the back of terminal 2 and the positive test leads through the back of the harness connector terminal 3 (as marked on the sensor body). Refer to the accompanying wiring illustration. With the ignition switch in the ON position and the engine OFF , the output voltage should be 4-5 volts.
  2. Start the engine and allow to idle at normal operating temperature. The output voltage should drop to 1.5-2.1 volts.
  3. Test the PCM terminal 36 (1993-95 models), and terminal 1 (1996-97 models) for the same voltage described above to verify the wire harness condition. Repair the wiring harness if the voltage is not the same.
  4. Test the MAP sensor supply voltage at the sensor connection terminal 2 and 1 with the ignition ON . The voltage should be 5 volts. Check the supply voltage at terminal 61 of the PCM. This should also be 5 volts.
  5. Using an ohmmeter, test the MAP sensor ground circuit at the sensor connection terminal 1 and at the PCM terminal 43 (1993-95 models), terminal 4 (1996-97 models). Repair the wire harness for an open circuit if infinite resistance is detected.
REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

jturcotte_1913.gif



Fig. Fig. 6: On the 3.5L engine, the MAP sensor is threaded into the left side of the intake manifold plenum

The MAP sensor is located in the rear of the intake manifold plenum on the 3.3L engine. On the 3.5L engine, the MAP sensor is threaded into the left side of the intake manifold plenum.

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Unplug the electrical connector from the sensor.
  3. Remove the MAP sensor mounting screws.
  4. Remove the sensor from the vehicle.

To install:
  1. Install the MAP sensor into its position and secure in place with the mounting screws. Tighten the screws to 90 inch lbs. (10 Nm), then rotate it to a horizontal position.
  2. Plug the electrical connector back into the sensor. Make certain that the connector is clean and snug fitting.
  3. Connect the negative battery cable.

Jul 05, 2011 | 1995 Chrysler New Yorker

1 Answer

My mechanic told me my P0107 is possibly bad. Is this located in the same location as the P0108


P0107 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Low Input

The Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor responds to changes in the intake manifold pressure (vacuum). 5 Volts is supplied to the sensor from the PCM (powertrain control module). Inside the MAP sensor is a resistor that moves in relation to manifold pressure. The resistor varies the voltage between about 1 volt to 4.5 volts (depending on engine load) and that voltage signal is returned to the PCM to indicate manifold pressure (vacuum). This signal is essential for the PCM to determine fuel delivery. A P0107 DTC is set when the PCM sees that the MAP signal voltage is less than .25 volts which is too low.

Potential Symptoms: Anytime the MAP sensor signal is low the vehicle will likely have a very difficult time starting. Other symptoms may include:
* Hard to start
* Long cranking times
* Sputtering/missing
* Blowing black smoke
* Poor fuel economy
* Dies intermittently
* MIL(Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination

Causes: The causes of a low MAP sensor signal circuit (P0107) could be any of the following:
* Bad MAP sensor
* Open or short in the signal circuit
* Open or short in the 5 Volt reference circuit
* Ground circuit open or shorted
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions: First, using a scan tool with the Key on and engine running, monitor the MAP sensor voltage. If it is reading less than .5 volts, turn engine off, unplug the MAP sensor and, using a DVOM (Digital Volt/Ohm Meter) check for 5Volts on the 5 Volt reference circuit.

1. If there is not 5 Volts on the reference circuit, then check for the reference voltage at the PCM connector. If it is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, repair the open in the reference circuit between the PCM and MAP harness connector. If 5 Volt reference is NOT present at the PCM connector, check powers and grounds of PCM and repair/replace as needed. (NOTE: On Chrysler products, a shorted Crank sensor, Vehicle speed sensor or any other sensor that utilizes the 5 Volt reference from the PCM can short out the 5 Volt reference. To fix simply unplug each sensor one at a time until the 5 Volt reference reappears. The last sensor unplugged is the shorted sensor.)

2. If you have a 5 Volt reference at the MAP connector, jumper the 5 volt reference circuit to the signal circuit. Now check the MAP voltage on the scan tool. It should be 4.5 to 5 Volts. If it is, replace MAP sensor. If not, repair open/short in the signal circuit wiring and re-check.

3. If all appears okay, perform a wiggle test. Start engine and manipulate the harness, connector and tap on the MAP sensor. Note any changes in voltage or engine speed. Repair connector, harness, or sensor as needed.

4. If the wiggle test checks out, use a vacuum pump (or just use your lungs) to draw a vacuum on the MAP sensor vacuum port. As you add vacuum the voltage should decrease. With no vacuum, the MAP sensor should read approximately 4.5 volts. If there is no change in MAP sensor reading on the scan tool, replace MAP sensor.

MAP Sensor DTC's: P0105, P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109.

Hope helps (remember rated and comment this).

Aug 06, 2010 | 1997 Chevrolet Venture

1 Answer

Engine stalls following oil/filter change


i whould change the sensor thats most likely the problem

Jul 22, 2010 | 1996 Chevrolet Suburban

2 Answers

I have a 97 grand prix which I had just replace the upper intake manifold on as it had a hole in it allowing the engine to take coolant into the cylinders and burn it. Now the check engine check light is...


The Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor responds to changes in the intake manifold pressure (vacuum). 5 Volts is supplied to the sensor from the PCM (powertrain control module). Inside the MAP sensor is a resistor that moves in relation to manifold pressure. The resistor varies the voltage between about 1 volt to 4.5 volts (depending on engine load) and that voltage signal is returned to the PCM to indicate manifold pressure (vacuum). This signal is essential for the PCM to determine fuel delivery. A P0107 DTC is set when the PCM sees that the MAP signal voltage is less than .25 volts which is too low.

Potential Symptoms Anytime the MAP sensor signal is low the vehicle will likely have a very difficult time starting. Other symptoms may include:
  • Hard to start
  • Long cranking times
  • Sputtering/missing
  • Blowing black smoke
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Dies intermittently
  • MIL(Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
Causes The causes of a low MAP sensor signal circuit (P0107) could be any of the following:
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Open or short in the signal circuit
  • Open or short in the 5 Volt reference circuit
  • Ground circuit open or shorted
  • Bad PCM
Possible Solutions First, using a scan tool with the Key on and engine running, monitor the MAP sensor voltage. If it is reading less than .5 volts, turn engine off, unplug the MAP sensor and, using a DVOM (Digital Volt/Ohm Meter) check for 5Volts on the 5 Volt reference circuit.
1. If there is not 5 Volts on the reference circuit, then check for the reference voltage at the PCM connector. If it is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, repair the open in the reference circuit between the PCM and MAP harness connector. If 5 Volt reference is NOT present at the PCM connector, check powers and grounds of PCM and repair/replace as needed. (NOTE: On Chrysler products, a shorted Crank sensor, Vehicle speed sensor or any other sensor that utilizes the 5 Volt reference from the PCM can short out the 5 Volt reference. To fix simply unplug each sensor one at a time until the 5 Volt reference reappears. The last sensor unplugged is the shorted sensor.)
2. If you have a 5 Volt reference at the MAP connector, jumper the 5 volt reference circuit to the signal circuit. Now check the MAP voltage on the scan tool. It should be 4.5 to 5 Volts. If it is, replace MAP sensor. If not, repair open/short in the signal circuit wiring and re-check.
3. If all appears okay, perform a wiggle test. Start engine and manipulate the harness, connector and tap on the MAP sensor. Note any changes in voltage or engine speed. Repair connector, harness, or sensor as needed.
4. If the wiggle test checks out, use a vacuum pump
(or just use your lungs) to draw a vacuum on the MAP sensor vacuum port. As you add vacuum the voltage should decrease. With no vacuum, the MAP sensor should read approximately 4.5 volts. If there is no change in MAP sensor reading on the scan tool, replace MAP sensor.

Feb 28, 2010 | 1997 Pontiac Grand Prix

2 Answers

93 lumina stalls at any speed will start again always


Might want to chg. the fuel filter, (if you havent already), also do a fuel pressure chk. filter could be pluged up and in turn weaken fuel pump.

Nov 13, 2009 | 1993 Chevrolet Lumina

2 Answers

Engine stalled while driving and will not restart


1994 Pontiac Bonneville was running sudenly staled ,full pump,power window and power lock not working

Jul 21, 2008 | 1994 Pontiac Bonneville

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