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Why do the rear wheels get very hot at hwy speed after only 20 mi?

I installed new master cylinder and brake pads and E-brake is not stuck.

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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Replace the rear brake hose/s. They deteriorate on the inside and clog up. Not letting the calipers or cylinders to release. I recommend replacing the front and rear.

Posted on Apr 22, 2015

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  • nun ya beesnus
    nun ya beesnus Apr 23, 2015

    Could it be possible both rear calipers went bad? It suv wasn't used for about 3yrs.

  • Randy Ohler Apr 23, 2015

    Sure it's possible. But not likely. If both the rubber boots where broken and water/moisture got in them, then yes they would rust on the inside and could freeze up. But brake fluid eats at rubber day in and day out. To check calipers, First raise the tires off the ground, put the transmission in neutral. Pump up the brakes, then let off. The rear tires should be hard to turn or won't turn at all, by hand. Loosen the bolt that holds the brake hose to the caliper until it starts dripping fluid.(on the back of the caliper) If the The tires turn freely, replace the broke hoses. If they are still locked up, replace the calipers.

  • nun ya beesnus
    nun ya beesnus Apr 23, 2015

    I will Definitely try that! Thank you very much!

  • ray gallant Apr 23, 2015

    daughter just had 1 rear tire blow out because of the hose collapsed and would not let brake release

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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From what you are saying there could be nothing wrong with it
I asume you have disk rear and hopefully when you did the pads you eighter replaced the rotors or had them turned.
The fact is brakes get hot it takes a lot of force per sq in on the pads aganist that rotor to stop the weight of the vehicle .
With drums on the rear and disk on the front the front do about 70% but disk all around its 50 /50 .
I would jack the rear wheels up 1 at a time and see if they spin freely .If they do their isn't any brake drag .The bigger problem with brakes is not enough force to the wheel not to much .
Just a new thought

Posted on Apr 23, 2015

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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Are the rear brakes drum or disc
is it necessary to remove the hub to do ant work
I am thinking out of adjustment hand brakes or over tensioned wheel bearings or if drums then shoes have been incorrectly fitted or adjusted
long guess is a faulty proportioning valve in the lines to the rear brakes

Posted on Apr 22, 2015

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  • Expert
  • 52 Answers

Ive had this problem on a friends car. you have to bleed all of the fluid from all 4 breaks until clean fluid flows. You have moisture in the fluid in one of the calipers, when you go down the road the acceptable drag on the breaks causes the moisture to expand and turn to steam that causes them to drag even more. His was so bad that it would lock up the breaks and his flex hoses were bulging from the pressure. Do the breaks seem to get harder to press when this happens? Never use break fluid that is open for more than a month. It hold moisture and turns cloudy.

Posted on Apr 23, 2015

  • Bill Boyd Apr 23, 2015

    moisture in brake fluid wiil tyrn to steam nut that will not increase pressure on the pads. If you have this problem then when the steam occurs the brake pedal will go to the floor as steam is compressible. disc brakes are not 50/50 as claimed because of the proportioning valve and if it was so then under heavy braking when the centre of gravity is moved forward lessening the load on the rear tyres they brakes would lock up and there would be an uncontrolled slide skid from the rear. rear discs and pads are smaller than fronts as well. the answer from jmbuga is probably the pointer tp the problem

  • 'Victor Collazo
    'Victor Collazo Apr 23, 2015

    AIR is compressible. STEAM is expanding moisture. That is how steam engines work. If steam was compressible, then you would not need an emergency pressure valve on a hot water heater or boiler. As for the proportioning valve comment, post it on the persons comment that said it. You dont seem to bright. I dont know why fixya gives points for just posting anything.

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: rear brake cylinders are stuck, can not push them in

I have a 2004 SAAB 93 and just finished replacing the brake pads and rotors yesterday. On the piston itself you should have two little notches. You can either or a GM rotor reset tool that will push into the two little notches and push against the piston while rotating it clock wise. Or the way that I did it was to take a C clamp and put the caliper back on the car. Clamp it on the back of the caliper to the front of the caliper so it will remain stationary. Then take a pair of needle nose pliers and rotate the two notches clockwise while pushing into the caliper. It will take some strength but you should be able to push them in. Be sure that you spray the boot around the piston when some WD 40 so it does not crack and or break during the process. If you have any additional questions about this feel free to email me.

James
jmbuga@juno.com

Posted on Nov 04, 2008

cadman000
  • 607 Answers

SOURCE: 1999 Pontiac Bonneville SE 3800 ABS Brake pedal will eventually reach floor after stopping while hold car stopped. Brake pads replaced less than 5000 miles ago. Fluid level at max and does not drop. O

I would replace the MASTER CYLINDER. BLEED AIR from master cylinder BEFORE INSTALLATION. Hope this helps

Posted on May 18, 2009

co7196
  • 3433 Answers

SOURCE: bad brakes on gmc suburban,

Gravity bleed your brakes starting at the wheel farthest from the master cylinder. No pweddle pumping. I Fill M/C and leave cover off. Then open the bleeder and watch what is coming out. Uou can see bubbles. When the fluid drips steady and without bubbles, cole and do the same to the other three. Don't let the master cykinder get low because thr fluid level helps move the fluid and air through the lines.Periodically tap the break lone with your wrench to keep everything moving.. When sll bleeders drip clean and steady. Make sore your rear brakes are adjusted to barely touch the drum. Then top off the master cylinder, cap it and give yourself a "break". :)

Posted on Jun 15, 2009

  • 691 Answers

SOURCE: 1994 Cavalier -replaced master cylinder-no pressure to rear brake

The most common bleeding procedure is to bleed the ABS brake furthest from the master cylinder first, then bleed the other brake that shares the same hydraulic circuit (which may be the other rear brake on a rear-wheel drive car, or the opposite front brake on a front-wheel drive car or minivan). After these have been bled, you then bleed the other brake circuit starting with the furthest brake from the master cylinder.
Air can be very difficult to remove from an ABS modulator assembly because of all the nooks and crannies inside the unit. The modulator may have eight to 10, or more, ABS/traction control solenoid valves, plus various check valves and dead-end ports. Some ABS modulators have special bleed screws to help you vent the trapped air when bleeding the system. Others do not and require the use of a scan tool to cycle the ABS solenoids while you bleed the system. 1. To bleed the isolation valves in the modulator, there are two bleeder screws. Start with the one toward the engine. Turn the ignition on and apply light pressure on the brake pedal. Open the bleeder screw and allow the fluid to flow until clear. Close the screw and do the same at the second bleeder screw. 2. Depressurize the accumulator by pumping the pedal 40 times with the key off. Wait about two minutes for the brake fluid to de-aerate, then refill the fluid reservoir with DOT 3 brake fluid. 3. Now you can bleed the boost section. This is done by applying moderate pressure on the brake pedal and turning the ignition on for three seconds, then off. Repeat this a total of 10 times. Make sure the pedal feels firm when you have finished, and give the car a road test to make sure the brakes are working properly.

Posted on Jul 25, 2009

protek480
  • 1714 Answers

SOURCE: 1997 Chevy 1500 pickup 2wd

One of the wheel cylinders is leaking, pulling air back into brake system and it's going back to the4 master cylinder. Look for brake fluid leaking at one of the wheel cylinders, that's where the problem is.

Posted on Oct 10, 2009

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Rear drums smell like something is burning and are hot.


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Replaced some brake line, rear pads and one rear wheel cylinder. Now no pressure and nothing happening when trying to bleed.


Does the car have ABS ? And does it have an equalizer block for the 4 wheels ?
It sounds like the ABS has been affected, or there is an equalizer block that is stuck on the front wheels only.
Can you open the bleeder or the rear line on the master cyl and get fluid to come out by depressing the pedal ?

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Brake pad stick get hot


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Here ya go! This is for the rear brake pads removal:

Removal & Installation
  1. Remove the brake master cylinder filler cap. Check brake fluid level in brake master cylinder reservoir. Remove fluid until brake master cylinder reservoir is half full.
  2. Raise and support the vehicle.
  3. Remove the wheel and tire assembly.
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  5. Remove the caliper pin bolts.
  6. Remove the rear disc brake caliper.
  7. Remove the brake pads and rail clips.
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  9. Installation is the reverse of removal. Observe the following torques:
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How to change brake pad and check rotors


Brake Pads Removal & Installation Front for_car_toy_cam_02-04_sst_frt_dsc_asm.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the front wheels. toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  3. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  4. Remove the 2 anti-squeal shims from each of the 2 brake pads.
  5. Remove the wear indicator from each of the 2 brake pads.
To Install:
NOTE: When replacing worn pads, the anti-squeal shims must be replaced together with the pads.
toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press piston into the caliper.
  2. Apply disc brake grease to the inside of each anti-squeal shim.
  3. Install the anti-squeal shims on each pad.
  4. Install the pad wear indicator clip to the pads.
  5. Install the pads with the pad wear indicator plate facing upward.
  6. Install the brake caliper with the 2 mounting bolts. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  7. Install the front wheels.
  8. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  9. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
Rear TMC made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmcrearbrakes.gif

TMMK made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmmkrearbrakes.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain the brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the rear wheels.
  3. Remove the caliper slide pins.
  4. Remove the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  5. Remove the rear brake calipers.
  6. Remove the 2 brake pads with the anti-squeal shims.
  7. Remove the anti-squeal shims and pad wear indicators from brake pads.
To Install:
  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press the piston into the caliper.
  2. Coat both sides of the outer anti-squeal shim with pad grease.
  3. Install anti-squeal shims to each pad.
  4. Install wear indicators on the 2 brake pads.
  5. Install the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  6. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  7. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  8. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  9. Install the rear wheels.
prev.gif next.gif Brake Rotor Removal & Installation Front To Remove:
  1. Remove the front wheels.
  2. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the front brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the front wheel disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the front disc.
  2. Install the brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bolts 79 ft-lb (107 Nm).
  3. Install the brake caliper. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the front wheel.
Rear To Remove:
  1. Remove the rear wheels.
  2. Remove the brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and the caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the rear disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the rear disc.
  2. Install the rear brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bracket bolts as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the bracket bolt 46 ft-lb (61.8 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the bracket bolt 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  3. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 32 ft-lb (43 Nm)
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the rear wheel
prev.gif next.gif

Jan 25, 2011 | 2007 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

How do you replace the front and rear brakes in a 2003 pontiac Grand Prix


Removal & Installation Front To Remove:
  1. Inspect the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir. Remove fluid from the reservoir until the level is lower then half way between the MAX and MIN levels.
  2. Remove the tire and wheel assembly.
  3. Install 2 wheel nuts to secure the rotor on the hub.
  4. Remove the bottom brake caliper pin bolt.
  5. Pivot the brake caliper body upward and secure out of the way. Do NOT disconnect the hydraulic brake flexible hose from the caliper.
  6. Compress the piston back into the bore using a C-clamp. Figure of brake assembly with caliper raised showing brake pads in mounting bracket gmpc_l4.gif

  7. Remove the inboard and outboard brake pads from the brake caliper bracket.
To Install:
  1. Install the brake pad retainers and both brake pads into the caliper bracket.
  2. Pivot the brake caliper down over the brake pads and into the brake caliper bracket. Insert the lower brake caliper pin bolt and torque bolt to 70 ft-lb. (95 Nm).
  3. Reinstall the tire and wheel assembly.
  4. Lower the vehicle.
  5. Refill the master cylinder. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the pads against the rotor.
  6. Check the master cylinder level and add fluid as necessary.
Rear To Remove:
Rear disc pads R&I gm-09-00-492.gif

  1. Inspect the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir. Remove fluid from the reservoir until the level is lower then half way between the MAX and MIN levels.
  2. Remove the tire and wheel assembly.
  3. Install 2 wheel nuts to secure the rotor on the hub.
  4. Remove the upper caliper mounting bolt.
  5. Pivot the caliper down to access the pads.
  6. Remove the inboard and outboard pads from the caliper bracket.
  7. Remove the brake pad clips from the caliper bracket.
  8. Compress the piston back into the bore using a C-clamp and the old inner pad.
To Install:
  1. Install new brake clips in the caliper bracket.
  2. Install the inboard and outboard pads in the caliper bracket.
  3. Pivot the caliper up over the pads.
  4. Reinstall the upper mounting bolt and tighten to 32 ft. lbs. (44 Nm).
  5. Remove the 2 wheel nuts securing the rotor.
  6. Reinstall the tire and wheel assembly.
  7. Refill the master cylinder. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the pads against the rotor.
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prev.gif next.gif

Aug 26, 2010 | 2003 Pontiac Grand Prix

1 Answer

Hello. i have a 1991 audi 100. brake padel has become mushy but there are no signs of brake fluid leak on the master cylinder or the lines. the brake pads are new. thanks


Just because there isn't an external leak in the brake system doesn't mean there isn't an internal leak in the master cylinder. A mushy pedal is usually an internal leak in the master cylinder or leaking wheel cylinders in the rear brake drums. Check the rear brake wheel cylinders for fluid leaks, if there are none or you do not have rear drum brakes, your best bet is the master cylinder :)

Sep 03, 2009 | Audi 80 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Rear brake to remove replace disk and service due binding


Preliminaries Do 1 wheel at a time Use a jackstand on the wheel you are working on (safety First) Remove the tire on the selected wheel
The Brake caliper is usually held on by 2 bolts. Some of the bolts are Allen wrench type, usually about ¼ inch or 5/16 inch. Remove and the complete brake caliper can be lifted off the rotor. The pads can now be removed. Before installing the new pads you must first return the pad piston to their original position in the caliper. Open the hood of the engine compartment and remove the cover on the master cylinder. This allow the brake fluid to be returned to the master cylinder. To return the pad piston to the original position you will need a C clamp and a flat piece of metal like a small flat file. Put the flat piece of metal on the piston and use the C clamp to put pressure on the piston. Tighten the C clamp slowly and you will see the piston slowly retract into the caliper body. Now you can insert the new pads into the caliper. Mount the caliper over the rotor and reinstall the 2 bolts.

Loringh Hope this helps Good Luck PS Please leave a rating if Appropriate Thanks

Nov 23, 2008 | 2001 Mazda 626

1 Answer

New brakes


Still have air inside, because you used gravity feed method.

Jul 17, 2008 | 2000 Chrysler Cirrus

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